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When you know it’s fall in Athens

Fall in Athens is a special time for those who love the University of Georgia, even if it arrives later than in other parts of the country. The weather finally cools, fall colors abound and football season is in full swing. In honor of the first day of fall today (Sept. 23), we asked a few current and future alumni how they know when it’s autumn in the Classic City:

“When the weather finally begins to cool down, falling leaves make North Campus look like an autumnal painting, and excitement fills the air in anticipation of each Saturday between the hedges, you know it’s fall in Athens. Fall in Athens fills me with an overwhelming feeling of gratitude that I am a student at UGA and will forever be a part of the Bulldog Nation.”

Caroline Kraczon ’21, Student Alumni Council president

 

“Most people associate fall in Athens with the beginning of football season, but as a student it was a time when my favorite people came together in our collegiate leadership organizations like the Arch Society, 4-H and Tri-Delta. The friendships that were formed then have lasted a lifetime!”

Brandie Park (BSA ’97), Women of UGA Council secretary

 

UGA Campus in Fall

“You know it’s fall in Athens when the grass on North Campus is filled with colorful leaves and more and more students find themselves outside throwing a frisbee or having a picnic. Fall in Athens is synonymous with football season. On Saturdays, Athens is the place everyone wants to be and the day is filled with tailgating, cheering on the Dawgs, and taking part in UGA’s greatest traditions.”

Rachel Byers ’19, Student Government Association president

 

“As the Roast Master for Jittery Joe’s, I know it is Fall when the cooler weather increases the amount of coffee I must roast. In addition to that, downtown is packed on home football games. Also, paddling down the river with Oconee Joe looks like a postcard with all of the colors of the leaves.”

Charlie Mustard (MS ’97), master roaster at Jittery Joe’s

 

UGA Campus in Fall

“To me, it doesn’t feel like fall in Athens until the Georgia heat finally begins to ebb so you can climb the campus hills without sweating through your shirt. That’s when the leaves start changing colors and the quads all look so inviting that you can hardly stand to be inside. That’s fall in Athens – irresistible!”

Rachel Webster (ABJ ’08), Women of UGA Council member

 

“At new student orientation each summer, I always speak to families about the importance of the first six weeks of classes. At UGA, we reach six weeks on September 25. At this point, most students have learned their way around campus (particularly the bus routes!), adjusted to the rigor and pace of university classes, and engaged with some new friend groups, programs and organizations. Yes, there are some rhythms that many UGA folks know well, such as fall colors, football cheers, and a cooler feel to the air (soon, I hope!), but the rhythm I enjoy most is that of the students settling in and deciding how to get the most out of their experiences here. We’ve had a great start this semester, and I’m looking forward to some wonderful few months of successes, both Between the Hedges and everywhere else on campus. This is how I know it’s fall in the Classic City! Go Dawgs!”

Victor Wilson (BSW ’82), UGA vice president for student affairs

 

UGA Campus in Fall

“I know when it’s fall in Athens because everyone finds a reason to be outside–laying on North Campus between classes, listening to the Chapel bell ring, watching the leaves change in color, admiring the brightly colored produce at the Athens Farmer’s Market, walking through pumpkin patches along Milledge Avenue, and running through the intramural field trails with friends. Athens offers something for everyone, but it truly shines when the temperature drops, the seasons change, and the campus and the community come alive!”

Sarah Rettker (BBA ’10), Women of UGA Council member

10 reasons it’s great to be a UGA grad

1. UGA has the best campus.

UGA's campus

Nothing beats campus in the fall (except campus in the winter, spring or summer). Even after you graduate and come ‘home’ to visit, it is somehow exactly the same and completely different. That’s the magic of being an alumnus of a school with so much history and a bright future.

2. UGA has the finest traditions.

The Arch

Not passing under the Arch is a lesson UGA students quickly learn, along with why leaving your house at midnight to Snellebrate is worth it, and why you have to visit sites like the Chapel Bell and Herty Field to celebrate big and small accomplishments. If you haven’t in a while, complete a UGA tradition the next time you’re on campus. As Larry Munson said, “There is no tradition more worthy of envy.”

3. Speaking of traditions: Saturdays in Athens are legendary. 

UGA Football

The population in Athens triples on game days, and for good reason. Everyone heads to town to tailgate, hunker down, and root for the Dawgs. The best college football team in the country. (Clemson and Bama, who?)

4. We have the greatest mascot. 

uga

Uga X was recently named the best mascot in college football by Sports Illustrated, as if you needed official confirmation. He’s the ‘goodest’ boy. Come on, just look at that face. 

5. Our academics are top notch.

Career Outcomes

Each class of new Bulldogs brings in more impressive high school GPAs and test scores. Our alumni use their first-rate UGA educations to excel in the workforce. That’s something to be proud of. 

6. Every Georgian is within 40 miles of a UGA facility.

Economic impact

As a land- and sea-grant university, it’s our mission to provide resources to every Georgian. With our vast presence across the state, we’re able to do that.

7. UGA has 80+ alumni chapters.

Hairy & Student

No matter where in the world you go, you can find a piece of home with your local alumni chapter. Never bark alone!

8. Our history is unlike any other university.

Chapel Bell

We were founded in 1785 are the birthplace of higher education in America. Nothing has slowed our progress in more than 230 years.

9. Everyone looks good in red and black.

hairy dawg

Enough said.

10. We are the Bulldog Nation.

There are two simple words that express the sentiments of the entire Bulldog Nation: Go Dawgs!

Are you loud and proud?

For those Bulldog Faithful and are interested in being “in-the-know” and helping us share great news with the rest of the Bulldog Family, we invite you to sign up to be a Digital Dawg! Digital Dawgs are the UGA Alumni Association’s social media ambassadors and help us BARK good news to communities around the world! Joining is simple:

  1. Sign up to be a Digital Dawg.
  2. Receive the latest news and updates from the UGA Alumni Association.
  3. Share the news on your social media channels to help spread the word.
  4. Stay connected with the Bulldog Nation!

National Dog Day

It’s National Dog Day today, and what better way to celebrate than with pictures of our favorite dog? Uga was first recognized as the university mascot in 1956. Since then, football fans everywhere recognize Uga by his spiked collar and varsity lettered jersey, custom-made from the same material as the players’ jerseys.

Uga was recently ranked No. 1 on Sports Illustrated’s list of The Greatest Mascots in College Football History, and we couldn’t agree more. Keep reading to learn more about the history of our award-winning mascotand favorite dogs. 

Uga X, “Que”

2015 – Present

Que served as the primary mascot for all the games of 2015, but was officially named Uga X in the game against Georgia Southern on November 21, 2015.

Uga IX, “Russ”

2012 – 2015

Uga IX was present for two SEC Eastern Division Championships, a Capital One Bowl win and a Belk Bowl win.

Uga VIII, “Big Bad Bruce”

2010 – 2011

Uga VIII’s registered name was in honor of Dr. Bruce Hollett of UGA’s School of Veterinary Medicine. Hollett was instrumental in the care and treatment of the bulldog mascots over the years. Uga VIII unfortunately had a short-lived reign after a lymphoma diagnosis in 2010.

Uga VII, “Loran’s Best”

2008 – 2009

After VII passed away unexpectedly in 2009, the bulldogs did not have a live mascot at the game. Instead, a wreath was placed on Uga VII’s doghouse and the players wore a special Uga VII decal on their helmets in remembrance.

Uga VI, “Uga V’s Whatchagot Loran”

1999 – 2008

Uga VI has the most wins in school history with a record of 87-27. He’s also the biggest Uga the university has ever had, weighing in at 65 pounds.

Uga V, “Uga IV’s Magillicuddy II”

1990 – 1999

Uga V graced the cover of Sports Illustrated in 1997 with the title of best college mascot in the nation.

Uga IV, “Seiler’s Uga Four”

1981 – 1989

Uga IV made an appearance at the Heisman Trophy Banquet with Herschel Walker. He was the first mascot ever invited to attend the Heisman Banquet!

Uga III, “Seiler’s Uga Three”

1972 – 1980

Uga III closed out his career in ultimate fashion leading the team to victory in the 1980 NCAA championship.

Uga II, “Ole Dan’s Uga”

1966 – 1972

Uga II was introduced at a pregame ceremony at Homecoming in 1966. The entire stadium erupted in a cheer, “Damn Good Dog!”

Uga I, “Hood’s Ole Dan”

1956 – 1966

Cecelia Seiler, whose family breeds the succession of Ugas, made Uga I’s original red jerseys out of children’s t-shirts.

Next time you’re between the hedges, be sure to take a peek at Uga’s air-conditioned doghouse next to the cheerleaders’ platform. You can also pay tribute to all past Ugas by visiting their memorial plots near the main gate in the embankment of the south stands. Before each home game, flowers are placed on their marble vaults.

Learn more about the Ugas from years past. 

Happy National Dog Day, or as we like to call it, Dawg Day!

Get the UGA coloring pages you never knew you needed

These coloring pages are perfect for Bulldog fans of any age, whether you use them to distract a toddler, de-stress after a long day, or decorate your space with reminders of Athens. And yes, you can use more colors than just red and black … just no orange!

Show us your creativity by posting these on social media and tagging the UGA Alumni Association and be sure to include #AlwaysADawg.

Click on each of the following images to download them. Don’t worry; we’ve made them printer-friendly!

 

UGA webpages through the years

In March 1989, Sir Tim Berners-Lee wrote a document called “Information Management: A Proposal.” Berners-Lee hoped to solve the problem of information sharing that was proving a common hindrance to the scientists in his lab. After submitting the proposal to his boss, the feedback he received was “vague but exciting,” an interesting way to describe what would become the World Wide Web.

Now, 30 years later, we celebrate this occasion each year on August 1: World Wide Web Day. Berners-Lee’s creation ultimately reshaped the way human civilization communicates, from government to business to art to the every-day. And like any communication method, its users inevitably change and reorganize it over time, often rendering old products anywhere from hilarious to inexplicable.

In honor of this 30th anniversary of the World Wide Web, let’s look back at UGA’s webpages of yore: built long before the days of PHP and HTML5, when you loaded a video today to watch it tomorrow, and when GIFs were innovative, transcendent mergers of technology and art.

We’ve got a few of our favorites listed below, but you can track down the web history of any school, college or department (or any website) you like at archive.org.

 

University of Georgia - July 1997

University of Georgia – July 1997

 

UGA Alumni Association - Feb. 2002

UGA Alumni Association – Feb. 2002

 

UGA Athletics - Nov. 1999

UGA Athletics – Nov. 1999

 

Grady College of Journalism & Mass Communication - Nov. 1996

Grady College of Journalism & Mass Communication – Nov. 1996

 

College of Education - Feb. 2000

College of Education – Feb. 2000

 

Franklin College of Arts & Sciences - Dec. 1998

Franklin College of Arts & Sciences – Dec. 1998

 

College of Family and Consumer Sciences - Jan. 1997

College of Family and Consumer Sciences – Jan. 1997

 

College of Pharmacy - June 1997

College of Pharmacy – June 1997

 

College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences - April 2001

College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences – April 2001

 

School of Social Work - Oct. 1997

School of Social Work – Oct. 1997

‘Moon Rocks!’ marks Apollo 11 anniversary

This story was written by Sara Freeland and was originally posted to UGA Today on July 7, 2019.


Fifty years ago, on July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin landed on the moon–the first time humans set foot on another celestial body. As the nation and the world celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing, the University of Georgia is taking an in-depth look at this historic milestone and the future of space exploration. 

Fifty years ago, people around the world stopped what they were doing to watch Apollo 11 land on the moon.

Today, most of the world’s population wasn’t even born when the moon landing took place.

But the significance of this historic milestone still resonates.

“It is fascinating that people feel such a connection to the moon landing and it still inspires curiosity,” said Sarah Anderson, a University of Georgia graduate student in history. “Everyone has a story about their viewing experience.”

Anderson curated “Moon Rocks!,” an exhibition hosted by UGA’s Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies to mark the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11. Anderson previously worked for two years at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

“Space inspires a sense of adventure and excitement. Astronauts were portrayed as All-American, hard-working, accessible heroes—a person that children could aspire to be. Astronauts provided hope of advancement and achievement for average Americans,” Anderson noted. “The exhibit explores this a little more, as well.”

Ultimately, what she hopes to accomplish with the exhibition is to bring generations together—those who witnessed the moon landing and have their own story of watching it on the television while holding rabbit ears with those who were born afterward and grew up with astronauts live-streaming space station experiments.

“Bringing in an exhibition that can provide that intergenerational experience is really important,” she said. “Something that people can reminisce and visit with their families and learn from their families is really important to do as an institution.”

On display in the galleries in the Richard B. Russell Special Collections Library through December, the exhibition features magazines, political cartoons, satellite models and photos taken from space of the Earth and the lunar landing. The display also includes a piece of the Apollo 9 spacecraft and a medallion that went to the moon and back.

The “Moon Rocks!” exhibition is on display at the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries through December. (Photo by Peter Frey/UGA)

Moon rocks on display

On July 16, 50 years after the Apollo 11 launch from Cape Canaveral (formerly known as Cape Kennedy), the libraries will host an event with moon rocks on loan from the Georgia Capitol Collection for one day only. The rocks, along with a state of Georgia flag that went to the moon and back, were given to Georgia by former President Richard Nixon, who gave every state moon rocks and small fragments from the Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 lunar missions after the landing.

The event will also show archival footage of the July 20, 1969, moon landing and have space-themed snacks, including astronaut ice cream and Tang.

To create the exhibition, Anderson found artifacts related to space travel in two collections: the Richard B. Russell Jr. Collection and the Herman E. Talmadge Collection.

Russell, namesake of the libraries building, was on the Senate Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences from its conception in 1958 until his death in 1971. The collections include gifts to Russell, magazines he collected, photographs, political cartoons, and letters between Sen. Talmadge and NASA. The exhibition also includes satellite and spacecraft models that Russell displayed in his office. Talmadge was the main advocate in bringing moon rocks collected on the Apollo 16 mission from the Lunar Stone Mountain to Stone Mountain in Georgia.

The Moon Rocks! exhibition features magazines, political cartoons, satellite models and photos taken from space of the Earth and the lunar landing. The exhibition was curated by Sarah Anderson, a UGA graduate student. (Photo by Peter Frey/UGA)

Behind the scenes

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, the Access and Outreach Unit of the Russell Library wanted an exhibition related to the historic event. Anderson, who was interning there, had experience handling spacecraft artifacts from her work at the Air and Space Museum.

A graduate student in the museum studies certificate program, Anderson graduated from UGA with a bachelor’s degree in history in 2013 and then worked at both the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum and Cape Henlopen State Park in Delaware.

A history buff, she initially took the National Air and Space Museum job to learn about World War II and Air Force history. Family history was part of the inspiration—her grandfather served as a radio operator on a B-17 in the U.S. Air Force during World War II.

At the Air and Space Museum, she worked command module hatches that went into space as well as spacecraft models. She worked with the parachutes deployed for landings after the Apollo command modules reentered Earth’s atmosphere and slowed the modules down to lessen the impact of the water landing. Working with these objects made her want to learn more about the history behind the space race and space travel.

Along with other staff at the Air and Space Museum, she began watching Space-X launches on NASA TV and watch NASA send cargo to the International Space Station.

“Seeing these objects that went into space gives you this connection to history that you wouldn’t have otherwise. It makes history more tangible and relatable. It makes you want to learn more about them,” she said. “I had the opportunity to see a multitude of objects that had traveled to an area that I will never be able to explore. I get to see and touch artifacts that have been on true adventures and have inspired awe through generations.”

Her internship at the Paul E. Garber Facility turned into a job and she also served as lead contractor for the medium artifact team. She learned about archival photography, the care of artifacts and how to maintain the integrity of pieces “so that they can be observed and analyzed for generations,” she said. “We would work with pieces that hadn’t been looked at in a while, and providing a stable housing environment for these artifacts is crucial.”

Her team created custom long-term storage structures for the parachutes, which are 25 meters wide. They also worked on ensuring care of artifacts not on display in the warehouses. Her team was in charge of medium artifacts, which means artifacts between 50 and 5,000 pounds. “I drove a forklift every day, which was a unique skill to learn, one that you don’t expect when you decide to work in museums,” Anderson said. “Collections work is delicate and detailed but moving large objects requires heavy machinery.”

A Bulldog Love Story: Glenn and “Susy” Taylor

Barbara "Susy" Nell Davis (BSHE ’48) and Glenn Lewis Taylor (BSED ’49) in front of their home.

Barbara “Susy” Nell Davis (BSHE ’48) and Glenn Lewis Taylor (BSED ’49) in front of their home.

At the end of World War II, there was a large influx of returning veterans to the University of Georgia campus, and Glenn Lewis Taylor (BSED ’49) was one of them. Glenn can’t remember if the year was 1946 or 1947, but the moment he met his future wife is one he’ll never forget. When they met, Barbara Nell Davis was pursuing her Bachelor of Science in home economics at the university after transferring from West Georgia.

Glenn Lewis Taylor (BSED ’49) sitting in Myers Quad.

Glenn Lewis Taylor (BSED ’49) sitting in Myers Quad.

One evening, Glenn and a friend were standing in line at Snelling Hall behind two attractive young ladies, so they started up a conversation. As Barbara liked to tell the story, back then, proper young ladies did not give their names to male strangers; so when they were asked, both she and her friend gave false names. She told her future husband that her name was Susy.

Barbara "Susy" Nell Davis (BSHE ’48) on the University of Georgia campus.

Barbara “Susy” Nell Davis (BSHE ’48) on the University of Georgia campus.

 

Several days later, Glenn and “Susy” ran into each other again in Snelling Hall. Glenn told her that he knew Susy was not her real name because he couldn’t find anyone on campus with the name she had given. She confessed, and they became friends. Six months later, they began to date, however, Glenn continued to call her Susy–as did their friends! Before long, she was known on UGA’s campus as Susy. They dated for about six months then decided to stop, but that only lasted for about a week before they got back together. Once they were back together, they started a serious relationship that eventually led to 54 years of marriage. Until her passing in 2004, Glenn and her friends called her Susy–a memory of that fateful day on the University of Georgia campus that brought them together.

 

Relive Your Glory Days: Decades photos

Are you planning to relive your glory days as a part of Alumni Weekend? In honor, we are going to be sharing throwback photos of alumni around campus from the 1960s, 70s, 80s, 90s, and 2000s.

The G Book – Traditions for the Returning Alumnus

The University of Georgia is the birthplace of public higher education in America. Our history is rich and full of unique stories and traditions. But traditions aren’t meant to simply be revered – they are meant to be lived! And at UGA, the Student Alumni Association is ensuring that students are a part of the living history of UGA through the G Book, UGA’s official traditions handbook.

The G Book is disseminated to students in their first year at UGA and contains information about the university, lyrics to cheers and, of course, a slew of traditions that will take students all over campus during their four years as a UGA student. Students who complete all 20 traditions in the handbook before graduation are among the Bulldog elite and earn the title of “Tradition Keeper.”

Live the Traditions While on Campus
Alumni who return to campus (say, maybe, for Alumni Weekend?) should be sure to pick up a G Book at the Wray-Nicholson House (or view it online) and follow in students’ footsteps as they relive traditions old and new. It’s a great way to relive your glory days, but also experience what it means to be a Bulldog today.

Curious what traditions are included in the 2018-2019 G Book?

Bulldog Love Stories