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Dawgs through the decades: UGA in the 1970s

Take a trip down nostalgia lane with our newest blog series documenting UGA in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. First stop: the psychedelic seventies! We sat down with alumni to learn about college life in a decade defined by war, protests and rock ‘n’ roll.  

The 1970s was a spirited decade in America and that was no different on campus. Long-standing traditions, like chanting “How ‘Bout Them Dawgs,” found their humble beginnings during these years. Prominent buildings and organizations also were established, fostering a university-wide commitment to preparing a generation of risk-takers and culture-shapers.

Students in the 1970s were curious and innovative, tenaciously searching for better answers and impactful solutions. Among UGA’s distinguished alumni from this decade, there are scientists, musicians, entrepreneurs, professors and U.S. representatives. Bulldogs from the 1970s continue to inspire those who will lead, discover and serve across our state, country and the world.

Campus Highlights

Here are some important moments from UGA’s history in the 1970s:  

1970

  • UGA celebrated the first Earth Day with a teach-in at Memorial Hall
  • Nearly 3,000 demonstrators gathered on campus to protest the Vietnam War 

1971

  • Aderhold Hall was completed (and named for UGA’s 17th president)

1972

  • Rising Junior Test was adopted as a graduation requirement  

1974

  • A standard minimum SAT score became a requirement for admission to UGA

1977

1978

  • The UGA Research Foundation was established
  • “How ‘Bout Them Dawgs” emerged as the battle cry of the Bulldog Nation
UGA map 1979

UGA’s campus in 1979. Notice any differences from today?

Classic City Entertainment

In 1972, Georgia lowered the legal drinking age to 18, greatly impacting Athens nightlife. Students flocked to live music at Memorial Hall, the Last Resort, the 40 Watt Club and Legion Field. University Union and downtown concert venues hosted national acts like the Allman Brothers Band, Bob Hope, Jimmy Buffet and Randy Newman.

Athens-based bands revolutionized rock and alternative music in the 1970s. Ravenstone, a politically active hard-rock band, formed at UGA early in the decade. The group supported anti-war protests and other social issues. In 1972, Ravenstone played at the first openly held LGBTQ rights dance in the Southeast. The B-52s played its first gig at an Athens house party in 1977, later releasing several best-selling records.

The Lamar Dodd School of Art sustained the Athens music scene. Throughout the 1970s, it attracted highly qualified and talented students who were seeking a receptive environment for visual arts. These students would become nationally recognized artists, musicians and scholars. In 1979, four students formed R.E.M. and made their debut appearance on WUOG, the campus radio station. R.E.M.’s creative ascent would help shape the Classic City into the cultural epicenter that it is today. 

Music Essentials

The 1970s gave rise to disco, rock, R&B and soul. Toward the end of the decade, hip-hop was born. Reminisce on the 1970s with this UGA Alumni playlist, a brief sampling of the bands and performers who ruled the golden era of music! 



Fashion Trends

While many students opted for jeans and T-shirts, Bulldogs in the 1970s boasted an eccentric style. Snelling Dining Hall held fashion shows, featuring trends like buckskin bags, wide leather belts, suede vests and bell bottoms. The Red & Black advertised inventive styles from stores like Clothesline, Millers at Alps and Sears at Beechwood.

Seventies fashion saw bold colors and patterns take center stage. Students expressed themselves through experimental, cutting-edge and unconventional clothing. Flared pants, pantsuits, platform shoes and ascots were worn by both men and women, paving the way for gender-neutral fashion.

Slang

In addition to trailblazing fashion and music, students established their own slang, too. Learn to speak like a Bulldog from the 1970s–of if you were a student during this decade, does anything sound familiar?

  • Crib: Apartment or home
    “Come to my crib to watch the Dawgs beat Auburn.”
  • Ace: Awesome
    “The Dawgs were ace this season.”
  • Skinny: The truth
    “Want the skinny? The Gators are going to lose.”
  • Far out: Cool
    “The B-52s’ new album is far out.”
  • Get down: Dance
    “Let’s get down at the 40 Watt!”
  • Right on: Agreement with something or someone
    “Go Dawgs? Right on!”
  • Chump:  Foolish person
    “Did you see that Georgia Tech fan? What a chump!”

Whether you graduated in the 1970s or just started wearing red and black, UGA remains more than a memory and more than a degree. It’s a deep-rooted community, centuries old and over 340,000 strong.  

Stay tuned as we travel to the 1980s!

*Shannon Moran, writing/communications intern for UGA’s Division of Development and Alumni Relations, is researching and writing this special blog series.

From Uga to the Arch, here are 6 UGA-themed emojis for World Emoji Day

Are you ever texting a friend on game day and wish you could show your Bulldog spirit with images? Maybe you’re posting a picture of North Campus and can’t express your thoughts with words alone. To celebrate World Emoji Day (July 17), we’ve created 6 UGA-themed emojis we wish were on our keyboards!

 

Heart Eyes Uga Emoji

Heart Eyes Uga

The Arch Emoji

The Arch

Super G Emoji

Super G

X Eye Gator Emoji

X Eyes Gator

Football Helmet Emoji

Georgia Football Helmet

UGA Bus Emoji

UGA Bus

Ten jokes for UGA fans on International Joke Day

In honor of International Joke Day (July 1), we’re spreading smiles and laughter among the Bulldog Nation by poking fun at our biggest rivals.

  1.  What’s the difference between a Georgia Tech football player and a dollar? 

    You can get four quarters out of a dollar!

  2.  How do you keep a Gator out of your front yard?

    Put up a goal post!

  3.  What do you get when you cross a Gator with a groundhog?

    Six more weeks of bad football!

  4.  How many Gators did it take to tackle JT Daniels? 

    Good question, no one knows!

  5.  What does a Georgia Tech grad call a UGA grad?  

    Boss!

  6.  What’s the best thing to come out of Gainesville, Florida? 

    I-75!

  7.  How do you make Gator cookies? 

    Put them in a big bowl and beat for three hours!

  8.  How does a UGA grad get a Gator fan off his porch?  

    Tip him for the pizza he bought!

  9.  What’s the difference between the Yellow Jackets and Cheerios?  

    One belongs in a bowl. The other doesn’t!

  10.  Why did the Georgia Tech football team cross the road?  

    Because it was easier than crossing the goal line!

On National Picnic Day, picnic like a Bulldog

April 23 is National Picnic Day. With spring blooming in Athens, it’s time to grab a blanket, pack a meal, invite a few friends and find your favorite outdoor spot at the University of Georgia. There are 700 acres of campus to choose from, and we lined up our top campus spots to help you picnic like a Bulldog.

Founders Memorial Garden

Founders Memorial Garden

Photo: Dorothy Kozlowski, University of Georgia Marketing and Communications

You can’t go wrong with anywhere on UGA’s historic North Campus, but the Founders Memorial Garden offers a quiet escape from the usual bustle of campus. Enter on Lumpkin Street across from Morris Hall to explore the 2.5-acre garden’s network of paths, koi pond and over 300 species of plants.


UGA Horticulture Trial Gardens

UGA Horticultural Trial Gardens

Photo: Dorothy Kozlowski, University of Georgia Marketing and Communications

Whether you have a green thumb or are horticulturally hopeless, the UGA Horticulture Trial Gardens is the perfect spot for the plant lover. Tucked between Snelling Dining Hall and the College of Pharmacy’s R.C. Wilson Pharmacy Building, this spot offers a variety of blooms, shady benches and a dreamy gazebo. Bonus: you can browse the plants being tested by UGA’s horticulture department while you’re there.


Lake Herrick Pavilion and Docks

dock at Lake Herrick

Photo: Andrew Davis Tucker, University of Georgia Marketing and Communications

Located within Oconee Forest Park, the Lake Herrick pavilion and docks offer several spots to soak up the sun on a spring day. Wander the lakeside trail or bring a frisbee to toss with friends.


West End Zone Overlook

aerial shot of Sanford Stadium

Photo: Andrew Davis Tucker, University of Georgia Marketing and Communications

G-Day means we’re creeping closer to fall and football season! If you can’t wait to cheer for the Dawgs as they tee it up between the hedges, feed your anticipation with a picnic on Sanford Stadium’s west end zone overlook. If you have a speaker, queue “Baba Riley,” “Glory” and “Let the Big Dog Eat” to mimic that Saturday-in-Athens feeling.


Coca-Cola Plaza

a green courtyard between two brick buildings

Photo: Dorothy Kozlowski, University of Georgia Marketing and Communications

Nestled in the center of the Terry College Business Learning Community is the Coca-Cola Plaza. This grassy courtyard near the heart of campus is a great spot to share a Coke with a fellow Bulldog. If you forgot your beverages – or your picnic basket – the Au Bon Pain inside the BLC offers coffee and pastry treats.


Turtle Pond

sunlight coming through trees near a pond

Photo: University of Georgia Marketing and Communications

The more, the merrier, right? A picnic at the Mary KahrsWarnell Memorial Garden, also known as the turtle pond, will guarantee a few aquatic guests at your picnic. This secluded spot outside the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources is a South Campus hidden gem.


Myers Quad

a grassy area with students in front of a building

Photo: University of Georgia Marketing and Communications

For the athlete or the social butterfly, Myers Quad is the perfect place to spend an afternoon. Bounded by Myers, Rutherford and Mary Lyndon halls, the quad hosts ultimate frisbee games, Spikeball matches and student gatherings big and small.


Herty Field

a fountain and green space in front of a building

Photo: Peter Frey, University of Georgia Marketing and Communications

Reconnect with UGA’s roots at the site of the first UGA football game in 1892. Before the English white bulldog was adopted as UGA’s official mascot, the Mercer Bears lost to the UGA Goats 50-0. That’s right – the UGA goats. This historic site is flanked by Moore College and the beautiful Herty Fountain.

Write a letter to an incoming student in your old residence hall

Some of the fondest memories for UGA alumni come from living in the residence halls, and in just a few short months, the Class of 2024 will begin its journey on campus.

What if you could write a letter to the incoming residents of your old residence hall? What advice or memories would you share with them? University Housing is collecting and distributing letters written by students and alumni to deliver to residents’ mailboxes for them to open when they arrive in August. You can even see a letter counter for each dorm!

“The Class of 2024 will arrive on campus with many doubts about what the year will look like,” said Meredith Gurley Johnson (BSFCS ’00, MED ’16), executive director of alumni relations. “These letters show incoming students all they have to look forward to, and that there’s a Bulldog network around the world to support them. My first-year roommate and I are best friends to this day because of the bond we formed in Brumby Hall. We can’t wait to write letters to new students.”

To write a letter, use the online form and share a short message–250 words–with an incoming resident. University Housing will print, package and deliver it for you. Here’s an example letter:

Dear resident,
Welcome to your new home! My name is Taylor and I graduated from UGA in 2007 with a bachelor’s degree in economics. During my first year at UGA, I lived in Mary Lyndon and had the best time. Some of my favorite memories included staying up late with friends to watch American Idol in the basement and Snellebrating after finishing a really difficult exam. I hope that this year brings you lots of fun memories in Mary Lyndon, it is such a special place to live. My one piece of advice for you is to not underestimate the amount of time it takes to walk to the bus stop – I spent many a morning sprinting to make it to the stop in front of Soule Hall. Also, don’t worry if it takes you a while to find your ‘people;’ I found mine later than expected, but I wouldn’t have it any other way. Wishing you the absolute best year at UGA!
Go Dawgs! Taylor, Class of 2007

Long after they are sent, letters are read, appreciated and kept by recipients. These letters will leave a lasting memory for incoming students that shows that Bulldogs Never Bark Alone — especially during uncertain times.

“The residence halls have always been and will continue to be a place where memories are made, friendships are built, and communities are formed,” said Jessica Keever (BS ’18), University Housing public relations specialist. “By submitting a letter, past residents provide a physical reminder of how strong the Bulldog community is both inside and outside the halls. We’re excited to facilitate this initiative and hope all past residents will submit a letter to welcome the next generation of Bulldogs.”

Please submit letters via the Key Notes Submission Form until Wednesday, July 15. Visit University Housing for more information and contact ude.agu@gnisuoh with any questions.

University of Georgia crossword puzzle

The first crossword puzzle ran in New York World on December 21, 1913, and was created by Arthur Wynne. Other newspapers began to run crossword puzzles shortly after, and the rest is history. Crossword puzzles now test our minds in newspapers, books, and more.

The University of Georgia’s independent newspaper, The Red & Black, publishes daily crossword puzzles online and in print on Thursdays, much to the delight of students seeking a distraction from their homework.

For many alumni, the R&B crossword was a daily endeavor on the bus and in (-between) classes. In honor of this little piece of UGA nostalgia, we designed a special UGA-themed crossword puzzle for you, our alumni and friends, to enjoy–after your homework is done, of course. See if you and your friends can get the answers correctly without peeking at the answers! Pro tip: we hope you remember the names of bus routes, dorms and dining halls.

Happy Thanksgiving, Bulldogs!

At this time of Thanksgiving, we pause to reflect on the support of our friends and the impact it has made on the University of Georgia.

Because of this generosity, we overcome obstacles, join together as one, and rise to the top. It allows our students, faculty, and staff to experience opportunities that would have been impossible without your it.

We proudly present the 2019 Thanksgiving video, which tells a story of community and gratitude in the UGA family. Please share the video with your family and friends!

*A special thanks to our cast, staff, student workers, and many campus partners who came together to produce this video.

Finding a home as a first-generation student

Written by Jasmin Severino Hernandez (AB ’13, AB ’13), UGA Young Alumni Leadership Council Vice President

I am a first-generation college graduate, born to immigrant parents from the Dominican Republic. Growing up, my family did not have a lot of resources. I grew up in a very low-income household and there were times when my parents would have to decide whether they were going to skip a meal in order to provide for my brother and myself. Growing up as a first generation American, I did not have a family member who could provide me with guidance as to the process of choosing a university or how to pay for college. I was constantly hearing statistics from others regarding the Latino dropout rate and it felt like I was always pressured to do more and be more to succeed and not be another number.

I transferred to the University of Georgia in 2010, with no idea how the transition would work. I transferred from a small liberal arts college, where I felt like I was a big fish in a little pond. At UGA, I felt quite the opposite. I felt like the world was my oyster, but I also felt lost in the sea of people. As a first-generation student, it felt lonely because I was immersed in a new experience with no idea how to navigate it all. I graduated from UGA in 2013, with a degree in political science from SPIA & another in Spanish from Franklin.

I have amazing memories from UGA.

The first was when my roommate convinced me that pageants could teach me how to be confident in myself. With her help, I competed in various pageants throughout undergrad. My greatest memories are from competing in Miss UGA in 2012 and 2013. I was a runner-up in the 2013 competition and it is a moment I will never forget. My mic went out during my talent routine and the audience only heard the last 30 seconds of my song … ironically where I had to sing the highest note. I received a standing ovation before the judges made me do it all over again!

“Some of our greatest memories involve our similar journeys as first-generation students trying to find a home, a voice, and ourselves in a new and unfamiliar place.”

In 2013, I also found my home away from home. I became a sister of Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority, Incorporated, which is an academic sorority. The Delta Alpha Chapter of LTA helped me grow into the professional I am today. The sisters embraced me at a time when I needed support. They taught me the value of hard work and inspired me to always believe in myself and to embrace life’s unexpected twists and turns. I am still very involved with my sorority and I enjoy seeing how our sorority changes the lives of other first-generation Latinas at universities across the country.

Lastly, UGA introduced me to the love of my life. While at UGA, I met a boy who I am lucky enough to now call my husband. For an entire semester, we would casually run into each other on North Campus. One day, we finally spoke, and the rest is history. We took our engagement photos on North Campus, as a sweet nod to the place that sealed our fate. We were married on homecoming day this year, October 19, 2019, and we still enjoy calling the Dawgs on Saturdays. Some of our greatest memories involve UGA and our similar journeys as first-generation students trying to find a home, a voice, and ourselves in a new and unfamiliar place.

Today, I serve as the Vice President for the UGA Young Alumni Leadership Council and I was chosen for the 2020 Class of UGA’s 40 under 40. Never in my wildest dreams would I have imagined this honor and to be listed alongside some of the smartest, brightest and most innovative of our alumni. Although my time at UGA was challenging in many ways, it also helped me grow immensely. I strive and continue to give back to both the University of Georgia and younger bulldog generations because I truly believe that when you have the opportunity to make it where you want to be in your journey, it is your responsibility to hold the door open for those that come after you. It really is my hope that other students read or hear my story and feel encouraged to push forward and to extend a helping hand whenever they can to those around them.

Somewhere along the way, UGA gave me everything I needed. Somewhere along the way, I found a home.

Pumpkin carving for the Dawgs

There’s nothing like fall in Athens. The leaves turn red and orange, Saturdays are spent cheering for our team in red and black, and the weather (finally) cools. As the year winds down, how can a Bulldog fan make the most of it?

With themed pumpkin carving, of course. If you’re looking to create a spirited jack-o-lantern, an anti-Gator warning for your neighbors, or simply want to show off those two simple words (Go Dawgs!), your UGA Alumni Association has you covered!

We’ve created a stencil set so you can go full Athens Picasso on your pumpkin this year.

georgia-themed pumpkins

A plethora of Bulldog pumpkins.

Remember, it’s not about having the prettiest pumpkin. All that matters is that you display your love for the Georgia Bulldogs.

Don’t forget to tag us on social media (Instagram, Twitter) to share your pumpkin creations!

Below are examples of the stencils you can download by clicking on the button below!

When you know it’s fall in Athens

Fall in Athens is a special time for those who love the University of Georgia, even if it arrives later than in other parts of the country. The weather finally cools, fall colors abound and football season is in full swing. In honor of the first day of fall today (Sept. 23), we asked a few current and future alumni how they know when it’s autumn in the Classic City:

“When the weather finally begins to cool down, falling leaves make North Campus look like an autumnal painting, and excitement fills the air in anticipation of each Saturday between the hedges, you know it’s fall in Athens. Fall in Athens fills me with an overwhelming feeling of gratitude that I am a student at UGA and will forever be a part of the Bulldog Nation.”

Caroline Kraczon ’21, Student Alumni Council president

 

“Most people associate fall in Athens with the beginning of football season, but as a student it was a time when my favorite people came together in our collegiate leadership organizations like the Arch Society, 4-H and Tri-Delta. The friendships that were formed then have lasted a lifetime!”

Brandie Park (BSA ’97), Women of UGA Council secretary

 

UGA Campus in Fall

“You know it’s fall in Athens when the grass on North Campus is filled with colorful leaves and more and more students find themselves outside throwing a frisbee or having a picnic. Fall in Athens is synonymous with football season. On Saturdays, Athens is the place everyone wants to be and the day is filled with tailgating, cheering on the Dawgs, and taking part in UGA’s greatest traditions.”

Rachel Byers ’19, Student Government Association president

 

“As the Roast Master for Jittery Joe’s, I know it is Fall when the cooler weather increases the amount of coffee I must roast. In addition to that, downtown is packed on home football games. Also, paddling down the river with Oconee Joe looks like a postcard with all of the colors of the leaves.”

Charlie Mustard (MS ’97), master roaster at Jittery Joe’s

 

UGA Campus in Fall

“To me, it doesn’t feel like fall in Athens until the Georgia heat finally begins to ebb so you can climb the campus hills without sweating through your shirt. That’s when the leaves start changing colors and the quads all look so inviting that you can hardly stand to be inside. That’s fall in Athens – irresistible!”

Rachel Webster (ABJ ’08), Women of UGA Council member

 

“At new student orientation each summer, I always speak to families about the importance of the first six weeks of classes. At UGA, we reach six weeks on September 25. At this point, most students have learned their way around campus (particularly the bus routes!), adjusted to the rigor and pace of university classes, and engaged with some new friend groups, programs and organizations. Yes, there are some rhythms that many UGA folks know well, such as fall colors, football cheers, and a cooler feel to the air (soon, I hope!), but the rhythm I enjoy most is that of the students settling in and deciding how to get the most out of their experiences here. We’ve had a great start this semester, and I’m looking forward to some wonderful few months of successes, both Between the Hedges and everywhere else on campus. This is how I know it’s fall in the Classic City! Go Dawgs!”

Victor Wilson (BSW ’82), UGA vice president for student affairs

 

UGA Campus in Fall

“I know when it’s fall in Athens because everyone finds a reason to be outside–laying on North Campus between classes, listening to the Chapel bell ring, watching the leaves change in color, admiring the brightly colored produce at the Athens Farmer’s Market, walking through pumpkin patches along Milledge Avenue, and running through the intramural field trails with friends. Athens offers something for everyone, but it truly shines when the temperature drops, the seasons change, and the campus and the community come alive!”

Sarah Rettker (BBA ’10), Women of UGA Council member