The Jerry Tanner Show – Week 1, 2021: Clemson

We made it! College football is back, and we’re kicking it off by playing that other school from South Carolina. Who was it again? Coastal? Furman? We’ve beat them twice as much as they’ve beat us, I know that. I’m sure it’ll come to me.

There’s just nothing quite like watching a Georgia game with a bunch of Dawg fans, and you can do just that anywhere in the country thanks to our Alumni Chapters’ Game Watching Parties! Go to alumni.uga.edu/football to find one near you, and you’ll Never Bark Alone.

Jerry Tanner is everyone you’ve ever met at a UGA tailgate, everyone who’s ever talked about Georgia football by your cubicle, and every message board poster who claims to have a cousin who cut Vince Dooley’s grass. He’s a UGA alumnus, he’s a college football fanatic with a Twitter addiction, and he’s definitely a real person and not a character played by Clarke Schwabe.

40 Under 40 Spotlight: Eric Gray advocates for inclusive adventure sports

Eric Gray (BSED ’04), executive director of Catalyst Sports, is committed to service and adventure. Eric and his team of dedicated volunteers break down the barriers that prevent people with disabilities from accessing adventure sports in their communities.

For his personal, professional and philanthropic achievements, Eric ranked among UGA’s 40 Under 40 Class of 2021. The program celebrates young alumni leading the pack in their industries and communities.

Discover how Catalyst Sports creates an inclusive environment for people with disabilities: 

How did Eric Gray become involved in Catalyst Sports?

Eric Gray received a degree in recreation and leisure studies from the Mary Frances Early College of Education. From a young age, he had a passion for improving the world around him.

At the age of 10, Gray received treatment for childhood cancer at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. Twenty-five years later, he returned to Children’s as a recreation therapist to give back and share his experiences to those facing similar circumstances. He also worked for the National Ability Center, where he taught people with disabilities how to ski, snowboard, canoe, climb, horseback, and cycle.

Removing barriers and creating access for people with disabilities is at the heart of Eric Gray’s work.

What is Catalyst Sports?

Catalyst Sports is a chapter based, nonprofit organization which gives people with physical disabilities access to adventures within a supportive community. Adventure sports like climbing and cycling empower people with disabilities to discover their strength.

“The Catalyst Sports family has helped me in my recovery, helped me heal and grow, test my physical and mental boundaries and has introduced me to new groups of people who love life and embrace challenges. I can’t thank you enough,” said Michael Breed, an active member of Catalyst Sports.

How can you support the mission to make sports more inclusive?

Private support is essential to Catalyst Sports’ success. The nonprofit relies on contributions from the community to ensure a more inclusive tomorrow. Donations support opportunities for training, certification, scholarships, recruitment, and purchasing new equipment.

SUPPORT CATALYST SPORTS

National Nonprofit Day Spotlight: Park Place Outreach Youth Emergency Services

August 17 is National Nonprofit Day, an opportunity to recognize, acknowledge and celebrate the positive impact of nonprofits.

Park Place Outreach Youth Emergency Services is an alumni-operated nonprofit based in Savannah, Georgia that serves runaway, homeless and at-risk youth aged 11 to 21. Since 1984, it has improved the lives of more than 6,500 young people. We spoke with Julie Wade (AB ’97, JD ’00), a dedicated alumna and executive director of Park Place Outreach, to learn how her nonprofit is making a difference.

What is Park Place Outreach’s mission?

Park Place Outreach is committed to leading and serving. The nonprofit strives to provide services to at-risk youth and their families, increase their functional level and reunify families whenever possible.

What resources does Park Place Outreach offer?

Park Place Outreach is proud to provide programs and services to at-risk youth and their families in the Savannah area. Since Wade’s appointment as executive director of Park place Outreach, she has initiated programs that raise awareness for homeless youth and advocate for safe, affordable housing.

“These are good kids in bad situations with no place to call home. With our help, we can change their legacy,” said Julie.

Park Place Outreach offers four main programs which include:

  • The Transitional Living Program (also designated as a Child Caring Institution by the state) provides temporary shelter to run away and homeless youth, victims of sexual exploitation and trafficking, and other youth in crisis.
  • The Street Outreach Program works to prevent the exploitation of youth living on the streets or in unsafe living conditions. The program’s mobile unit engages with homeless youth or those who are at-risk for homelessness or human trafficking to deliver care packages containing food and hygiene materials, as well information on safety and local resources.
  • Family Preservation for Teens works with teens and their families to receive case management services, support services and placement prevention services to help teens remain safely in their homes to sustain and maintain family stability.
  • Rapid Re-Housing Services mitigate homelessness by helping families and individuals find and stay in housing.

How has Park Place Outreach grown over the years?

Park Place Outreach made the 2021 Bulldog 100, a list of the 100 fastest-growing businesses owned or operated by UGA alumni. Julie Wade and her team at Park Place Outreach are curious and innovative, tenaciously searching for better answers and more impactful solutions.

Julie Wade

Julie Wade, executive director of Park Place Outreach.

Park Place Outreach expanded into a new facility with increased living and working spaces for their programs. The newly remodeled youth emergency shelter allows team members to provide a safe environment for vulnerable youth in the Savannah community. The nonprofit has also grown environmentally conscious, having recently received a LEEDs Green Building certification.

What led Julie Wade to Park Place Outreach?

Julie Wade demonstrates the value of a degree from the birthplace of higher education. After graduating from the UGA School of Law, Julie clerked for a judge in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, practiced law at various firms and served on the Board of Education for Savannah/Chatham Public Schools. Julie joined Park Place Outreach in 2017, applying her legal background to child advocacy.

Julie has been honored by the UGA Alumni Association’s 40 Under 40 for leading the pack in the nonprofit industry. She is dedicated to creating better communities around the world and empowering the next breed of Bulldogs to continue that tradition.

“Together we can make this a better world. Park Place Outreach is in the business of changing lives, giving hope and improving odds by ensuring that youth have access to safety, guidance and caring adults.”

How can Bulldogs support Park Place Outreach?

Park Place Outreach relies on charitable donations to provide programs and ensure a safer tomorrow. Julie and her team invite you to join them on their mission to protect those most at-risk in our communities, the children.

SUPPORT PARK PLACE OUTREACH

With Halloween right around the corner, here are 10 things that scare UGA fans

With Halloween around the corner, we’ve built a list of 10 things guaranteed to scare UGA fans … from wearing orange to Alabama quarterbacks, let us know what’s missing from the list!

1. Wearing orange and blue

Bulldog fans can agree this color combo needs rethinking.

2. Noon kickoffs

Noon games with thousands of fans sweating during a typically hot and humid fall in the South? No thanks!

3. Being ranked No. 1 at the start of the football season

Being an underdog gives the Junkyard Dawgs room to rise to the occasion.

4. Seating in Sanford Stadium

With a 92,746-seat capacity, making room for friends and family can be stressful.

5. Misspelling Dawgs or referring to the Arch as “The Arches”

True UGA fans know that “Dogs” is not the preferred spelling and that the Arch is singular–not plural.

6. Alabama backup quarterbacks

The backup QB spot somehow manages to save Alabama time and time again.

7. Forgetting the words to “Glory, Glory”

We promise we won’t tell anyone.

8. Leaving before the fourth quarter of a night game

Don’t miss the red glow, twinkling cell phone lights and the Redcoat Band’s rendition of Krypton!

9. Sideline penalties

The Bulldog Nation’s unsung hero is Scott Sinclair, director of strength and conditioning and Kirby Smart’s “get-back” coach.

10. Uga overheating

UGA fans want to protect this good ol’ boy at all costs. That’s why Uga’s on-field home is a permanent, air-conditioned doghouse with a bag of ice to chill on during even the hottest Saturdays in Athens.

Dawgs through the Decades: UGA in the 1980s

As the birthplace of higher education in America, UGA is guided by a respect for history and tradition while keeping a firm eye on the future. We’re taking a trip down nostalgia lane this fall to learn about college life through the decades. So put on your acid wash jeans and roll up those blazer sleeves … it’s time to head back to the 1980s.

The 1980s were defined by pop culture, consumerism and the end of the Cold War. It was a spirited decade in America and that was no different on the UGA campus. Long-standing traditions found their humble beginnings during these years. Our historic campus also expanded with newly established buildings and organizations.

Students in the 1980s were hopeful and enthusiastic about the opportunity to improve the future. They embodied the spirit of UGA, striving to create better communities around the world and empower the next breed of Bulldogs to continue that tradition. Among UGA’s distinguished alumni from this decade, there are professional athletes, writers, educators, business leaders and government officials. Bulldogs from the ’80s demonstrate the incredible value of a degree from UGA.

Campus Highlights

Here are a few key moments from UGA’s history in the 1980s: 

1980

  • UGA was accorded sea-grant status
  • Center for Global Policy Studies established (editor’s note: now the Center for the Study of Global Issues-GLOBIS)
  • Coach Vince Dooley reinstated “silver britches” as part of the UGA football uniform
  • The UGA football team won a National Championship
  • The UGA Board of Regents voted to approve the Red and Black‘s independence from the university
  • The UGA Athletic Association established its first women’s track and field team

1981

  • Harold Wright became the first Black drum major for the Redcoat Marching Band

1982

1983

1985

  • UGA celebrated the bicentennial of its founding
  • The men’s tennis team won UGA’s first NCAA team title

1986

1987

1988

1989 

UGA Map 1986

UGA’s campus in 1986. Notice any differences from today?

Classic City Entertainment

With a growing and more diversified music industry, Athens saw new bands and venues emerge in the 1980s. The 40 Watt Club moved to a larger space, and the landmark Georgia Theatre was reopened as a music venue in 1989.

The Athens music scene spread to houses around Baker Street and in clubs such as the Georgia Bar and Tyrone’s OC. College students danced to local bands like the Side Effects, the Tone Tones, the Method Actors, Pylon, Love Tractor, and the Brains. The B-52’s and R.E.M. paved the way in pop culture, becoming the first internationally renowned bands from Athens after launching a string of hits in the early ’80s.

Music Essentials

The 1980s saw the emergence of hip hop and electronic dance music. Artists like Madonna, Cyndi Lauper, Michael Jackson, and Def Leppard revolutionized the music scene with their eccentric looks and cutting edge performances. Reminisce on the ’80s with this UGA Alumni throwback playlist!

Fashion Trends

The 1980s boasted bold styles, colors and silhouettes. Eclectic fashion was all the rage, with trends ranging from permed hair and ripped jeans to shoulder pads and oversized blazers.

Most Bulldogs in the ’80s opted for casual attire like crew neck Georgia T-shirts, cuffed jeans, thick ankle socks and white sneakers or Doc Martens. “Power dressing” became popular at the height of the decade as women wore jumpsuits, structured tops, pinstripe pants, chunky jewelry and bright colored high heels. Androgynous fashion also evolved throughout the 1980s; women adopted a more traditionally masculine style, while men continued to experiment with traditionally “feminine” looks.

Technology

  • Personal computers became common on campus in the 1980s. Many students swapped out their typewriters for computer labs in libraries and dorms. However, before the Internet, these computers were only capable of playing games, word processing, and mathematical calculations.
  • Walkmans were the first form of portable, personal music. Students could be seen enjoying their favorite cassette between classes.
  • Boomboxes were a much larger alternative to portable music. Students lugged these gadgets around campus and downtown, tuning into local radio stations like WUOG.
  • VHS players allowed students to watch films from the comfort of their dorms, apartments and houses. Bulldogs could also record football games straight from the TV and watch the highlights later.

Whether you’ve been Calling the Dawgs since the 1980s or just learned the words to “Glory, Glory,” we remain united by the Arch and the Hedges. We are Georgia Bulldogs, and we Never Bark Alone.

Stay tuned as we continue on this trip down nostalgia lane. Next stop: the 1990s!

(and don’t forget to check out the 1970s post in this series!)

*Shannon Moran, writing/communications intern for UGA’s Division of Development and Alumni Relations, is researching and writing this special blog series.

Create a UGA Mentor profile that stands out

Serving as a UGA Mentor is one of the most rewarding opportunities to support University of Georgia students. As you begin your journey in the UGA Mentor Program, check out these tips to crafting a mentor profile that will connect with students looking for guidance and career advice:

  1. Upload an image of yourself to your profile. Students are more likely to request a mentor when there’s a photo.
  2. Include some of your demographic information. Students often request mentors based on their own identities and interests.
  3. Opt in to participate in informational interviews. Some students prefer to dip their toes into networking before committing to a 16-week mentor relationship. Opting in to participate in informational interviews allows students to meet with you for 30 minutes to ask their work-, life- and career-related questions. It can also help them determine if you two make a good mentoring match. Learn more about how informational interviews increase the chances of a student connecting with you.

 

Not a UGA Mentor, but would like to be? Learn more or sign up now!

The Jerry Tanner Show – 2021 Season Preview

The 2021 season is upon us! Another chance to dream of gridiron glory and have our hopes vaporized by the indifferent chaos of college football. Jerry Tanner is back to provide the temperate, nuanced analysis that’s made him a household name. Just kidding, he’s back to hollering and carrying on.

Jerry Tanner is everyone you’ve ever met at a UGA tailgate, everyone who’s ever talked about Georgia football by your cubicle, and every message board poster who claims to have a cousin who cut Vince Dooley’s grass. He’s a UGA alumnus, he’s a college football fanatic with a Twitter addiction, and he’s definitely a real person and not a character played by Clarke Schwabe.