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Turn up the volume and jam your way to Indianapolis

The Bulldogs are heading to Indianapolis, vying for a National Championship victory over Alabama on January 10. Whether you’re enduring the 9-hour drive to Lucas Oil Stadium or cheering on the Dawgs from Athens, a good old-fashioned playlist will help you prepare for an epic showdown in Indy.

From “Glory” and “Baba O’Riley” to “Dooley’s Junkyard Dogs” and “In the Air Tonight,” we’ve got you covered with over 140 songs in our Road to Indianapolis: National Championship Edition playlist.

Watch out, Bama. “The Boys are Back in Town” and are looking to rise up “Against the Tide.” “I Gotta Feeling” that our Dawgs are going to “Rock You Like a Hurricane” come January 10. “Don’t Stop Believin’,” Bulldog Nation!

Former Bulldog representing red and black at Orange Bowl

This story was written by Heather Skyler and originally ran on UGA Today on December 21, 2021.

Anne Noland (ABJ ’15) works as senior director of football communications for the Miami Dolphins, but when she enters her workplace–Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida–on Dec. 31, it will be as a fan of the Georgia Bulldogs.

Noland graduated from UGA in 2015 with a degree from the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication and has already risen to the top of her field, becoming the third woman in the National Football League to lead a public relations department.

At Noland’s small private high school in Peachtree Corners, Georgia, students were required to be involved in sports or after school activities year-round, and since she didn’t have a fall sport (she ran track in the spring) her mother encouraged her to ask the football coach about helping with the team.

The coach said he needed someone to keep stats and Noland was in. “He handed me a pencil and pad and said to bring my own calculator,” she recalled. “There were computers available then, but that’s how we did it at the time. I crunched the numbers myself, then every Friday night I’d call the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and provide them with the final score and any other stats they wanted.”

She already knew quite a bit about the game from watching the Bulldogs with her family and learning more about football’s intricacies and plays from her father, but in her position keeping stats, she really fell in love with the whole environment. “I was a ballet dancer and I dabbled in other sports,” she said, “but I was never really a team sports player and that was my first experience of it.”

During Noland’s junior year, her father died of cancer, and although she didn’t tell any of the players about it, the entire football team along with their families showed up at the funeral to support her. “That’s the moment I knew that, moving forward, I always wanted to be part of a team,” she said.

NFL and UGA connections

Since graduating from UGA, Noland’s job has overlapped a few times with her alma mater. Prior to her position with the Dolphins, Noland worked for the Patriots when the team included former UGA players Malcolm Mitchell (AB ’15), David Andrews (M ’15), Isaiah Wynn (BSFCS ’18) and Sony Michel (M ’18), among others.

“To work with them at the NFL level and win a Super Bowl with those guys was really cool,” she said.

In February 2019, while working for the Patriots during Superbowl LIII in Atlanta, students from Grady were in attendance and Noland got to talk to them about her job.

Despite still being fairly new to the world of professional football, Noland has already faced her share of challenges, including the effects of COVID-19 on professional sports and the changing news cycle, which has evolved into a 24-hour, non-stop cycle in recent years due to the evolution of social media, in particular.

“Before, when someone was going to break a story, they would call you first to let you know and get more context, etc. Now because of Twitter, one source can give someone information and they just go with it.”

But she loves her job and tries not to ever forget the excitement and awe she experienced in her early years working with the Dawgs and Grady at UGA.

“Earlier this season I received a Facebook memory from 10 years ago on that day. It was a photo of my first UGA football game credential from the press box. I remember how excited I was about that. And now that’s second nature,” she said.

Noland chose UGA, in part, because it has elite athletic and academic programs, and she said she learned so much from so many but recalled Senior Associate Athletic Director of Sports Communications Claude Felton (ABJ ’70, MA ’71) in particular. “He was pivotal to my life and career and taught me so much. The more I work in this business, the more amazed I am by how he treats everyone. He’s never too busy for anyone.”

“Athens and UGA are special places,” she added. “I think it’s a community of people who love the university and are proud to be there. When you have that kind of a shared pride it creates a very special environment.”

Travelin’ tips from UGA grads for World Tourism Day

The COVID-19 pandemic has assuredly thrown a wrench in–or entirely squashed–the travel plans of Bulldogs across the country. For those who work in the travel industry, it’s been an especially difficult year. So today, on World Tourism Day (Sept. 27), we checked in with a few travel-savvy alumni to see what tips they have for those looking to adventure beyond American borders. We also asked them where they hope to visit someday.

Europe Scene

Favorite Place to Visit Outside the U.S.

“I studied abroad in college–once in London and once in Verona. There’s a special place in my heart for both the UK and Italy, and I can’t wait to return!” –Jessica Drew (BSFCS ’09, MS ’12), travel advisor, SmartFlyer, Jessica Drew Travel

“Hippo Lakes African Safari Lodge outside of Johannesburg, South Africa. It’s a temperate climate year-round, beautiful, relaxing, and full of wildlife in their natural habitats.” –Stephanie Donlan (ABJ ’03), owner/travel planner, SJL Travel Co.

“Europe! I toured Germany, Austria, and Hungary with Adventures by Disney and Ama Waterways in 2018 and it was like sailing through a fairytale. It was a beautiful, educational and luxurious adventure.” –Christy Shadday (BSED ’93), co-owner and travel advisor, FTM Travel

“South Africa! I’ve been fortunate to visit twice and am so excited to visit again in the future.” –Lindsey Epperly (AB ’11), founder and ceo, Epperly Travel

“London is one of my favorite places. I was a history major at UGA and love how much history there is in London and that there are so many amazing things to experience!” –Elisabeth Alston (AB ’13), luxury travel advisor, Monarch Travel Team

“The Caribbean and its stunning sunrises and sunsets, fantastic weather, beautiful beaches, and great people. The list goes on!” –Eric Bowman (ABJ ’10), executive editor, TravelPulse.com

“Barcelona, Spain. The food and culture are amazing!” –Kim Hector (BBA ’06), owner and travel concierge, K. Hector Consulting LLC

Greece

Tips for Those Planning To Travel Abroad in 2021-2022

“Plan your trip at least six months in advance and remember to purchase travel insurance!” –Kim Hector (BBA ’06), owner and travel concierge, K. Hector Consulting LLC

“With recommendations and rules changing daily, it’s important to remain flexible and have the most up-to-date information.” –Jessica Drew (BSFCS ’09, MS ’12), travel advisor, SmartFlyer, Jessica Drew Travel

“Use a travel advisor. They can help plan, find amazing deals, and you’ll have someone in your corner should something happen on your trip.” –Eric Bowman (ABJ ’10), executive editor, TravelPulse.com

“Remaining flexible is key! When a travel expects the unexpected—whether a delayed flight or a change to COVID protocols—flexibility allows them to turn on a dime.” –Lindsey Epperly (AB ’11), founder and ceo, Epperly Travel

“Look into vendors with flexible date change policies.” –Stephanie Donlan (ABJ ’03), owner/travel planner, SJL Travel Co.

“Use a travel advisor! We are here to advise and guide clients so that costly and disappointing travel hiccups due to ever-changing travel protocols don’t happen.” –Christy Shadday (BSED ’93), co-owner and travel advisor, FTM Travel

“Check your passport expiration date! There is a backlog for renewals right now and we’ve had clients have to postpone or cancel trips because they didn’t get their passport back in time.” –Elisabeth Alston (AB ’13), luxury travel advisor, Monarch Travel Team

Africa

Where Would You Travel with an Unlimited Budget?

“I like to see new places, so right now, Italy is at the top of my bucket list. The food, the wine, the history … Venice, Rome, Florence, Lake Como, the Amalfi Coast, Tuscany … I’d love to spend an entire month exploring it all!” –Eric Bowman (ABJ ’10), executive editor, TravelPulse.com

“It would be a dream to hop on the Four Seasons private jet and hop around the globe at their hotels.” –Lindsey Epperly (AB ’11), founder and ceo, Epperly Travel

“I would love to visit Africa. There is such a stigma about this beautiful area and I would love to explore everything!” –Kim Hector (BBA ’06), owner and travel concierge, K. Hector Consulting LLC

“I would love to visit Greece for an extended vacation. The culture, landscape, and food seem like the perfect combination for an idyllic getaway.” –Jessica Drew (BSFCS ’09, MS ’12), travel advisor, SmartFlyer, Jessica Drew Travel

“Paris because it’s a magical city that has history, art, food, wine and Disney.” –Stephanie Donlan (ABJ ’03), owner/travel planner, SJL Travel Co.

“I would charter a luxury yacht and sail the Western Mediterranean with my family. I’m a fan of unpacking once and waking up in a new destination each day.” –Christy Shadday (BSED ’93), co-owner and travel advisor, FTM Travel

“Africa is at the top of my bucket list. I would love to start in Kenya or Tanzania and do a safari, and then end in the Seychelles for some island relaxation.” –Elisabeth Alston (AB ’13), luxury travel advisor, Monarch Travel Team

Thanks to these globe-trotting Bulldogs for their insights. Wherever you travel next, snap a photo in your UGA gear and tag @UGAAlumni and use #AlwaysADawg. If you’re looking to plan your next getaway, check out the incredible tours offered through the UGA Alumni Association’s official travel partners.

Meet Daniella Singleton, UGA Young Alumni Leadership Council secretary

The University of Georgia’s Young Alumni Leadership Council is made of graduates of the past two decades who connect alumni in their age demographic to UGA. Whether that means raising money for Campus Kitchen at UGA through a Cooking Class with Peter Dale (ABJ ’99) or interviewing alums like comedian Mia Jackson (AB ’00), they work to ensure that the 40,000 young alumni living in metro Atlanta are connected to their Bulldog family and that they Never Bark Alone.

We recently chatted with Daniella Singleton (BS ’08, AB ’08), secretary of the Young Alumni Leadership Council, to learn about her role as a project manager at Google and her experience at UGA.


Daniella SingletonHow did you become secretary for the Young Alumni Council?  

A good friend, Shayla Hill, was on the council when it first started. When she saw that they were taking applications for new members, she encouraged me to apply. I’ve enjoyed working with Luke Massee, Frances Beusse and Realenn Watters [from UGA’s Office of Alumni Relations]. I liked being as involved, so B.C. — before Corona —  I signed up to be the secretary. I was especially excited to be part of the all-female executive team with Elizabeth Cox, the president, and Jasmin Severino Hernandez, the vice-president.

What do you enjoy most about being on the council?

I enjoy the interactions that we have. It was hard this past year with COVID-19 and trying to be safe and respect people’s boundaries. Being on the Young Alumni Leadership Council is about engaging with other graduates, who I may or may not have known, and learning about their UGA experience and their passions.

What’s the most important thing you learned at UGA?

One of the biggest takeaways has been that while I might not be from Athens, it will always be home — that includes my dearest friends who were involved in my life and my child’s life. UGA is also where I learned how to communicate. It’s where I had a full-time internship through the criminal justice program. I learned how to balance. I’ve learned so many things about myself that Athens will always be home. As soon as get off 316, I immediately feel like I’m home.

What advice would you give to a UGA student? 

Cherish it, make memories, and stay up late laughing with friends. Because 1) you won’t get naps when you’re an adult and 2) it’s not as easy as an adult. Just continue to learn. Feed that hunger. Fuel that thirst of just wanting to know more. So say yes. Do it. Be more involved. Do what you can, meet who you can, and create memories that will last forever.

What’s your favorite UGA memory? 

It’s a tie. The first was serving on the committee for Dance Marathon (now UGA Miracle), and how emotional and amazing an experience it was. The second was the 2007 UGA vs. Auburn “blackout” game in 2007.   

 

 

Meet Morgan Cook, UGA Young Alumni Leadership Council member

The University of Georgia’s Young Alumni Leadership Council is made of graduates of the past two decades who connect alumni in their age demographic to UGA. Whether that means raising money for Campus Kitchen at UGA through a Cooking Class with Peter Dale (ABJ ’99) or interviewing alums like comedian Mia Jackson (AB ’00), they work to ensure that the 40,000 young alumni living in metro Atlanta are connected to their Bulldog family and that they Never Bark Alone.

We recently chatted with Morgan Cook (BBA ’15, MBA ’19), a member of the Young Alumni Leadership Council, to learn about her role as a project manager at Google and her experience at UGA.

Morgan CookHow did you become a member of the Young Alumni Leadership Council?

I serve on Terry College’s Young Alumni Board, and when I thought I was going to roll off it last year, I explored ways to stay involved at UGA. I had attended some Women of UGA events, and learned that there was also a Young Alumni Leadership Council. Once I applied, I talked to Luke Massee [in the Office of Alumni Relations] about it and then got on it! 

What do you enjoy most about being on the council? 

There are probably two things. One of them is just staying active with UGA. I got so much out of my college experience that I’ve always wanted to give back. Another is just the social interaction and the networking with the council and the alumni relations staff. 

What’s the most important thing you learned at UGA? 

It’s not what you know, it’s who you know. 

What advice would you give to a UGA student? 

I would say get involved in campus life and organizations because it’s only going to enhance your college experience. 

What’s your favorite UGA memory? 

Probably either the 2013 Georgia vs. LSU football game or running into Miss Sandra on campus. 

 

Peter Dale cooks with the Young Alumni Council

Chef and restauranteur Peter Dale (ABJ ’99) led a virtual cooking class with the Young Alumni Council and it went deliciously. Peter is an award-winning chef and has flavored Athens’ dynamic food scene with restaurants like The National, Seabear Oyster Bar, Condor Chocolates and Maepole. Peter demonstrated three recipes over the course of the evening: a local greens with pears and asiago cheese salad, gambas al ajillo, and chocolate budino.

If you missed the event, don’t worry! The recording is just above the post title on this page, and here we have the recipes and ingredient lists straight from Peter.

By the end of the event, attendees donated an impressive $1,700 toward the purchase of a food truck for Campus Kitchen at UGA that will allowed them to expand their service. That total recently reached $2,500, triggering matched funds from the UGA Young Alumni Council (for a total of $5,000) and reaching the fundraising goal for the truck purchase. Thanks for getting that food truck rolling, Bulldog donors!

UGA Class of 2020 achieves 91% career outcomes rate despite pandemic

Of University of Georgia Class of 2020 graduates, 91% were employed or attending graduate school within six months of graduation, according to career outcomes data released by the UGA Career Center. The Class of 2020 data includes undergraduate, graduate, and professional students who earned degrees between August 2019 and May 2020.

Regarding 2020 UGA graduates:

  • 61% were employed full time.
  • 22% were attending graduate school.
  • 8% were engaged in post-graduation internships, fellowships, residencies, postdoctoral research, part-time jobs, reported their status as entrepreneurs or were not seeking employment.

“The impact of COVID-19 on the job market has been significant with fewer job opportunities, postponed or rescinded job offers, and more students altering plans to attend graduate school,” said Scott Williams, executive director of the UGA Career Center. “Overcoming all of these challenges reflects the tenacity, determination and resilience of the Class of 2020.”

Of those who reported full-time employment, 40% cited the UGA Career Center as the most effective resource used during their job search. Another 29% credited experiential learning for helping them find employment, indicating the university-wide experiential learning requirement is boosting career preparation. The requirement took effect in fall 2016, making the Class of 2020 the first graduating class for which every undergraduate student was required to have at least one significant hands-on learning experience.

Graduates from UGA’s Class of 2020 were hired by 2,880 unique employers and are working full time across all sectors of the economy, from business (72% of graduates working full time) to education (17%), government (6%) and nonprofit (5%). Top employers for the Class of 2020 include Amazon, Bank of America, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Deloitte and The Home Depot.

Of graduates employed full time, 59% secured employment prior to graduation and 99% were hired within six months of graduation.

“Despite the last few months of my college career being spent in a virtual environment, the UGA Career Center made every effort to provide the Class of 2020 with the resources we needed enter the ‘real world’ in these unprecedented times,” said Jyoti Makhijani, a May 2020 graduate who earned a degree in marketing.

When Makhijani’s start date with Big Four accounting firm KPMG was delayed from July to November as a result of the pandemic, she continued to lean on the UGA Career Center, which offers programming for both students and alumni.

“During these months of uncertainty, I continued networking through virtual Arch Ready sessions,” Makhijani said. “I remember attending a budgeting and money management Arch Ready presentation as an alumna and thinking how much I appreciate that the UGA Career Center is there for students and alumni every step of the way.”

Nearly three-quarters of Class of 2020 graduates working full time accepted employment within the state of Georgia. Graduates landed in 48 U.S. states and 33 countries in the six months after graduation, with top out-of-state destinations spanning the country and including major metropolitan areas such as Boston, Chicago, New York City and Washington, D.C.

The Class of 2020 data showed an increase in students who chose to pursue additional education, up three percentage points from the Class of 2019, amid uncertain economic conditions. The 22% of 2020 graduates furthering their education have enrolled in top graduate or professional schools including Columbia University, Duke University, Emory University, Georgetown University, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University and Vanderbilt University.

The UGA Career Center calculates the career outcomes rate each January by leveraging information from surveys, phone calls, employer reporting, UGA departmental collaboration, LinkedIn and the National Student Clearinghouse. The preceding data is based on the known career outcomes of 8,581 graduates from the Class of 2020.

For more information on how the Class of 2020 overcame the pandemic and its economic effects, visit career.uga.edu/outcomes.

To learn about hiring UGA graduates, visit career.uga.edu/hireuga.

Jordan Rowe releases debut country music track, “Good for Nothin”

UGA graduate Jordan Rowe (AB ’19, AB ’19) is working hard in Nashville to write and record country music that he hopes will make the Bulldog Nation proud. Since graduating from UGA with two degrees from the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and a certificate in music business, Jordan has seen great success as he pursues a career as a singer-songwriter. Earlier this fall, he released his debut track “Good for Nothin.” We caught up with Jordan to ask him a few questions and get to know him better.

Q&A with Jordan Rowe

What inspired you to study both agriculture and music business at UGA?

Being from South Georgia, I was familiar with agribusiness, and I knew I could find a job in that field if music didn’t work out. However, music was where my heart was, so I wanted to make sure I knew as much about that business as I could before making the move to Nashville.

Are there any Nashville Bulldogs who have helped you along the way?

My current roommate and one of my best friends is Ray Fulcher (BSED ’08, MED ’10) (photo below, far left). He’s penned four No. 1 hits for Luke Combs and is pursuing his own artistry. I met Ray at a Georgia Theatre show while I was in school, and we hit it off from the beginning. He let me come up and live with him for a summer before I graduated so that I could get ahead of the game and start writing and meeting people here a little early. We’ve been good friends ever since.

Ray Fulcher at UGA Game

A few of Jordan’s favorites:

  • Restaurant: Rachel’s in Watkinsville
  • Professor: Ben Campbell
  • Class: Anything Ben Campbell teaches
  • Student Organization: UGA Bass Fishing Team
  • Sanford Stadium Moment: Watching one of my best friends, Jake Fromm, lead the Dawgs to a win over Notre Dame in 2019 (see photo below)
  • Football Rival You Love to Hate: Alabama
  • Best Concert Venue: Georgia Theatre
  • Best Concert: Opening for Riley Green at the Georgia Theatre
  • Song from College: The Battle Hymn trumpet solo during the pre-game ceremonies
  • Part of Campus: Ag Hill

Jake Fromm and Jordan Rowe

Interested in learning more about this young Bulldog making his way in Nashville? Follow Jordan on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

UGA helped Kaitlin Miller to “serve well and wholeheartedly”

Kaitlin Miller (AB ’13, AB ’13, ABJ ’13) is passionate about the people in her life. They inspire her, they guide her and they even helped her become a Bulldog.

“UGA was a natural choice for me for several reasons,” said Kaitlin. “It was close to home. My older sister went there, and I didn’t know exactly what I wanted to do. Some colleges are so specialized, but UGA had so much breadth that allowed me to test, try and experience.”

Kaitlin triple majored in International Affairs in the School of Public and International Affairs, Public Relations in Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication and Economics in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, enjoying the variety of coursework offered by all three schools.

She also participated in the Honors Program and the Student Government Association, and she was a tour leader at the UGA Visitor’s Center and a member of Omicron Delta Kappa, Palladia, Sphinx Society, Dean William Tate Society and Blue Key. All along the way, she built friendships that she maintains and treasures to this day.

Kaitlin’s favorite memory at UGA is homecoming week of her senior year. She was on the homecoming court and remembers feeling that Bulldog spirit all over campus all week long: everywhere she went and in every meeting she attended. She was amazed to see generations of alumni coming home to Athens to attend the game.

As an official ending to her college career, she gave a speech at graduation. An avid runner, she recalls running through campus, weeks beforehand, with her speech on a loop in her head. She hoped to honor those who invested in her. She recalls it was one of those moments where God carried her through.

Kaitlin’s advice to current students, “Humble yourself enough to seek counsel from those wiser than you.”

Everything that the Triple Dawg learned in her studies, through balancing extracurriculars, classes and leadership roles and by surrounding herself with people she looks up to has paid off. Kaitlin has worked at Chick-fil-A since she graduated and has served in several roles along the way: Digital Marketing, Hospitality Trainer, International Learning Designer and, currently, the Menu Team.

“I get to work with phenomenal people who are wise and kind with a strong sense of purpose and significance,” said Kaitlin.

Today, she serves as leader of Chick-fil-A’s UGA Alumni Corporate Chapter. There are currently 300 UGA alumni either on staff or operating Chick-fil-A restaurants. They like to invest in students through the connect-hire-give initiative by both mentoring and giving to Let All the Big Dawgs Eat program, a need-based food scholarship program.

“We’re a restaurant; it makes perfect sense for us to feed hungry kids and let them focus on school and leadership,” said Kaitlin.

She just finished graduate school in May. When asked what’s next, she said, “I just try to make the most of each day; serve well and wholeheartedly.”

Isobel Mills (BFA ’12) made her passion her profession thanks to a UGA education

Isobel Mills (BFA ’12) is always eager to try new things. As a child, Mills was interested in puzzles, building with Legos and drawing. She was always drawn to texture and she found a way to bring texture to life through ceramics.

She knew she wanted to major in art, but once she was accepted into the Lamar Dodd School of Art at the University of Georgia, she discovered the parallels between ceramics and fabrics. Once she learned to sew, there was no turning back.

“When I see a picture or a painting, I think of how to make it textural. I always see pleats,” said Mills.

She moved to New York a month after she graduated and spent the next eight years working and learning.

“My UGA degree prepared me to do many different things, and I tried many different things—from interior design to jewelry design—but I never worked as a fabric designer, so I continued to create my own fabric designs when I wasn’t working,” said Mills.

“I decided to quit my job at the end of 2016. I then made it my job to learn the business. Consequently, I made a pattern a day, learned new skills by watching YouTube videos, got certified in Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop and met with everyone I knew to network and pick their brains. Turns out people really and truly want to help, so don’t ever be afraid to ask—that one took me a while to learn.”

She officially launched ISOBEL in May of 2018 in NYC because she lived up the block from her dream showroom, Studio Four NYC. She knew that was where her line belonged, and she wasn’t moving until that dream became a reality. Once she got accepted into that showroom, the first domino fell: Other showrooms began reaching out, and her line slowly grew. She moved back to Georgia nearly two years later once she felt that her line had a presence.

Mills stayed in close contact with some of her UGA professors who gave her invaluable advice along the way on how to get started. One of her professors, Clay McLaurin, was five years into his launching his own brand as well, and he happily shared his experience and wisdom with her.

Her hard work eventually paid off. In addition to her online presence, her fabrics are featured in seven showrooms across the country.

Mills’ favorite memories at UGA are the times she spent with classmates and friends. She recalled the many hours outside the classroom that she spent working on projects and the enduring friendships that were born out of those long hours. For years, she’s met up with friends she met through her sorority for one football game a year, even when she lived in New York.

Her advice for current students: “Listen to your internal voice. Always do what you love, don’t give up and you will find a way to make your passion your profession.”

These days, Mills serves on the Board of Visitors at Lamar Dodd. She feels honored to sit on a board with people who have so much experience and for whom she has so much respect. She feels called to give back to the school that gave so much to her.