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It’s the perfect time to become a UGA mentor

Why now?

Students will be back soon and looking to connect with experienced Bulldogs like you. In the video above, you’ll hear why your fellow alumni find mentoring so rewarding and don’t want you to miss out.

Connect anywhere and one your schedule. Getting started is easy.

  • Create a profile at mentor.uga.edu.
  • Accept a student request for mentorship.

What’s the commitment?

  • 1-2 hours per month for four months (16 weeks)
  • Share knowledge, experiences and feedback.

Informational interviews require even less of a time commitment.

If a 16-week mentorship doesn’t suit your schedule, consider making yourself available for 30-minute informational interviews with students instead.

Help a student realize their potential.

“I was lost before I met my UGA mentor. I really feel more confident about my abilities because of them.” – UGA Student

It may surprise you how much you get out of giving back in this way!



On the fence? Want to learn more?

Register for the UGA Mentor 101 webinar on August 3. You’ll hear from successful mentor and mentee pairings, learn how to form a strong connection with students and discover tricks to becoming a great mentor.

Students want to see themselves in their mentor.

The UGA Mentor Program needs you!

There is a student coming in the fall that can benefit from your experience. The UGA Mentor Program is simple to join, and mentoring can fit within your schedule. A 16-week mentorship requires only 1-2 hours per month. Making yourself available for 30-minute informational interviews are another option. It may amaze you how much you get out of giving back as a mentor.

To help new and potential mentors learn more about mentoring, the UGA Mentor Program is hosting a webinar, UGA Mentor 101, on Aug. 3 from 3:30-4:30 p.m. You will hear from successful mentor/mentee pairings, learn best practices for forming a strong connection and discover tips to become an effective mentor.

The UGA Mentor Program has facilitated 2,775 mentoring relationships since its inception, and 99% of mentors who completed a 16-week mentorship cycle were satisfied with their experience in the program. But perhaps the best endorsement of the program comes from students.

“Jumping into college as a freshman, you have no idea what the future or even next week will look like,” said one student in the program. “You’re making new friends, learning how to get around and deciding how you want to spend the next 30-plus years of your life. I felt stuck struggling to choose a major—until I joined the UGA Mentor Program. Because of my mentorship, I am confident, knowledgeable and on the road to success.”

 

Catch-up with the RealTalk Podcast

RealTalk is a podcast produced by the UGA Mentor Program and, if you haven’t been listening, you’re missing out. The episodes help you gain an understanding of the experience of students from different generations, learn about the positive impact of mentorship and serve as a reference should you or someone you mentor ever experience a similar issue. The good news is, there is time to catch up on the previous season before new episodes come out this fall. To learn more about the UGA Mentor Program or sign up to be a mentor, please visit mentor.uga.edu.

Here is what you missed:

Being Black at a Predominantly White Institution – Part 1

Play buttonUGA Mentor Program Ambassador Kyla Edwards (Class of ’22) speaks with UGA alumni Yenu Wodajo (BS ’02) and Jeffrey Brown (AB ’05) about their experiences as Black students at UGA.

Being Black at a Predominantly White Institution – Part 2

Play buttonUGA Mentor Program Ambassador Kyla Edwards (Class of ’22) returns to speak with UGA alumnus Cecil Threat (ABJ ’82) to discuss their experiences as Black students at UGA and within the broader community.

Personal Growth through Mentorship

Play buttonUGA Mentor Program Ambassador Sara Ervin (Class of ’23) and UGA alumna Jasmin Severino Hernandez (AB ’13) discuss being a first-generation and transfer student at UGA, the magic of “no,” the positive influence of mentors and more.

The First-Generation College Student Experience

Play buttonUGA Mentor Program Ambassador Mahi Patel (Class of ’23) and UGA alumnus Will Ngo (BBA ’07 & MBA ’10) discuss life at UGA as first-generation students, expectations of immigrant parents and more.

Imposter Syndrome 

Play buttonUGA Mentor Program Ambassador Bella Sci (Class of ’22) and UGA alumna Cat Hendrick (ABJ ’20) discuss imposter syndrome and how it’s impacted their journeys as students at UGA and beyond.

Where commitment meets community: Randy Tanner (BBA ‘79) invests in Atlanta’s next generation

As a young insurance professional in Atlanta, Randy Tanner (BBA ’79) easily found volunteer opportunities within his industry. But the UGA grad wanted to get more involved in supporting his greater Atlanta community, so he researched new opportunities. His search led him to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Atlanta – where, 30 years later, he serves on the board of directors.

Big Brothers Big Sisters is a national organization that facilitates one-on-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth. Through over 235 chapters across the United States, more than 2 million children have been served in the past decade. Another UGA grad, Artis Stevens (AB ’97), became the organization’s president and CEO in January.

In the three decades since first hearing about Big Brothers Big Sisters, Tanner has served as a “big brother” to two “little brothers.” In 1991, he was matched with Cody. After Cody’s family left Atlanta, Tanner then matched with Adam. When Cody moved back to Atlanta, Tanner maintained relationships with both Adam and Cody—as part of the program and as they became adults.

Randy Tanner (BBA ’79) and his ‘little brother’ Adam Meacham at a Big Brothers Big Sisters legacy gala.

The ‘Rolls Royce of mentoring’

Tanner calls Big Brothers Big Sisters’ model “the Rolls Royce of mentoring.” Potential volunteers participate in an orientation process to introduce them to the program. Once a volunteer commits to at least one year of mentoring, the organization matches them with a child and the child’s family.

As Tanner embarked on the journey to become a mentor, he weaved his mentee into his life. From sharing a meal to throwing a football at the park, the flexibility of the program allowed Tanner to invest in mentoring relationships while operating Tanner, Ballew & Maloof, Inc., an independent insurance agency he founded in 1993.

“My responsibility was to get together with them regularly and have a good time,” Tanner said. “I was a part of their lives and let them see my life, ask me questions, and talk about their plans.”

The Big Brothers Big Sisters experience also allowed Tanner to engage in the Atlanta community as he desired when he was first seeking a new volunteer experience.

“In Atlanta, we have such a vibrant nonprofit community,” Tanner said. “There are a lot of good things being done, and the need is great with Big Brothers Big Sisters.”

More than a mentor

Mentoring led Tanner to serve Big Brothers Big Sisters beyond being a big brother. After serving as an ambassador and then a board member, the local board elected him as chair in December 2020.

In this role, Tanner directs fundraising efforts and raises awareness for the organization as it facilitates mentoring relationships with approximately 1,100 children in metro Atlanta. He also gets a front row seat to the organization’s mentoring success stories.

Last fall, Tanner received the 2020 V. Thomas Murray Founder’s Award from Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Atlanta in recognition of his commitment to the community.

“The award allowed me to reflect and experience a great deal of gratitude for all that I’ve learned during the process and from being a big brother,” Tanner said.

A lifelong commitment

Tanner retired from Tanner, Ballew and Maloof last month, so he plans to dedicate some of his extra time to Big Brothers Big Sisters. Just as Tanner maintained connections with his little brothers, he plans to stay connected with the nonprofit.

To Tanner, commitment means learning how and why you can give back to the community. His ‘how’ has been mentorship, and his ‘why’ has been relationships.

“It’s primarily about having compassion for people and wanting to help those who are in a tougher station of life than you,” Tanner said. “I’m committed to Big Brothers Big Sisters, and I anticipate staying involved for life.”


WHERE COMMITMENT MEETS COMMUNITY

Whether life takes them to new cities or to the neighborhoods where they grew up, Georgia Bulldogs do more than get jobs – they elevate their communities. Bulldogs lead nonprofits, effect change and create opportunities for others. Wherever people are suffering, wherever communities are looking for effective leaders and whenever the world cries out for better solutions, Bulldogs are there to answer the call to service. It’s more than our passion. It’s our commitment.

Caroline Odom, an intern with UGA’s Division of Development and Alumni Relations, brings you a spring blog series that celebrates Bulldogs who embrace that commitment to helping others in their communities thrive.

Want to read about other Bulldogs impacting their communities?

Meant to be—a UGA Mentor Program testimonial

In honor of Women’s History Month, the UGA Mentor Program is highlighting two strong Bulldogs. Holli Hines Easton (BBA ’93) mentors Olivia Kernels, UGA Class of 2023. Here, in their own words, is the story behind their incredible connection.

Holli Hines Easton (BBA ’93), Mentor

When Olivia contacted me via the UGA Mentor Program platform, she wrote the most endearing, kind, earnest note sharing her class year, major, and volunteer experience with the Humane Society (an organization dear to my heart). Lastly, she mentioned she was in a sorority holding a leadership office. Olivia’s note captivated me through her gracious, poised words. I responded immediately that I would be honored to serve as her mentor and that I, too, was a member of the same sorority and that I was in the same leadership role while I was at UGA. Meant to be!

Olivia and I scheduled a standing bi-weekly call. On our first call, I learned that beyond us being sorority sisters, we lived in the SAME BEDROOM in the sorority house — the same bed, same side of the room. Amazing! Olivia and I immediately bonded. We have had an incredible experience talking through Terry College of Business applications, resume crafting, cover letters that set you apart from other candidates, study habits, thriving academically during a pandemic. I cannot put into words how special this mentor-mentee relationship is. This is such a rewarding experience and I am grateful to serve as Olivia’s mentor. This was meant to be, and I am thankful to the University of Georgia for creating this special program.

Olivia Kernels, (UGA Class of 2023), Mentee

When Mrs. Easton was suggested to me via the UGA Mentor Program platform, I immediately reached out to her and I am so grateful that I did! We clicked due to our shocking similarities—both marketing majors, both in the same sorority, and we both held the same leadership position in that sorority. She even lived in the same room I am in at the sorority house!

Aside from this, Mrs. Easton has helped me set goals and educated me more about the marketing industry. I had no idea what I’d want to do after I graduate. Thanks to Mrs. Easton, I am gaining a better understanding of the ins and outs of a career in marketing. She encouraged me to grow as a student and has provided me with knowledge and support ranging from resume building to learning about her career.

Mrs. Easton and I have cultivated an awesome mentor-mentee relationship. I look forward to talking with her bi-weekly. One of my favorite parts about the UGA Mentor Program is that you are not only gaining a mentor, but also a friend. From my experience, your mentor really cares about you and what’s going on in your life. While I enjoyed learning from Mrs. Easton regarding the business and career sphere, I have equally enjoyed getting to know her as a person. I cannot say enough good things about the UGA Mentor Program and the amazing connection it has given me.

Sign up for the UGA Mentor Program and create an amazing story of your own!

The mentoring relationship from both sides

Hunter Smith (AB ’18 ) mentors Bryson Henriott (Class of 2023). Here, they share their perspectives about the mentoring relationship in their own words.

The Mentor (Hunter Smith [AB ’18])

The cinematic legend Steven Spielberg once said, “The delicate balance of mentoring someone is not creating them in your own image, but giving them the opportunity to create themselves.” When you step back, the role of a mentor is more akin to that of a producer or director — they help the writer, the mentee, to see their goal through; to advance their vision. When I was first contacted to serve as a mentor, I felt woefully unprepared to fulfill the role. What benefit could I, a young professional having only graduated two-and-a-half years earlier, really provide a student only a few years my junior? Since graduating, I had not seen the realities of the “real-world” which would have warranted me to give sage advice on the best career and life moves. Instead, I had spent my time in law school and currently was juggling my own fears concerning life and career moves. In my mind, I was not yet an individual worth emulating; I was not yet a mentor.

Upon reflection, though, I realized mentorship is not a demonstration of excellence to be emulated, but is instead a journey towards one’s truest potential—both for the mentee and the mentor. When I thought back to my mentors in college, I realized that the importance of my experience was not in their title or who they were, but instead in how they made me feel, the opportunities they gave me, and in who they allowed me to be. A good mentor provides mentees a chance to develop themselves by acting as a sounding board and guiding light. Mentorship is not a map, but a compass. My best mentors in life, have been with me every step of the way, not telling me what to do or where to go, but have given me a refuge to run to when times get tough, stability in times of uncertainty, and a light when things seem dark.

By stripping the idea of mentorship as the pinnacle of excellence, I have also come to understand that mentorship can have lasting effects for the mentee as well as the mentor. Though the few ages difference between my mentee and me worried me at first, I have since come to understand this as a benefit. Though he is my mentee, he is also my friend; I see myself in him and when I give him advice or answer his questions, I feel as though I am talking to my younger self. In helping him navigate this time in his life, I also feel compelled to reflect on my own journey and those who helped me and may also be able to provide mentorship to him. My mentee challenges me to see the world from new perspectives, reminds me of where I have come from, and challenges me to reach new heights. Mentorship is a pursuit of self-development and, as such, it is a recursive and reiterative lifelong process. What good is knowledge and experience without someone to share that wisdom with? And the sooner we do so, the better the world. Even as I provide mentorship to others, I look to my own mentors for guidance in my life. Mentorship is a crucial relationship in life—whether you are old or young, you have value as a mentor because you can advise and counsel others and provide them an opportunity to create themselves. Each day I strive to be like the visionaries that came before me and light the way for the generation that will follow.

 

The Mentee (Bryson Henriott, Class of ’23)

As a rural first-generation college student, the process of thinking about graduate school, choosing between internships, and deciding on a career overwhelmed me. There was a moment during freshman year when it hit me that although I made it to college, I had no idea how to navigate the steps during and after college. I was interested in law school, but did not have anyone that I could talk to about the LSAT, applications, how law school realistically is, and how to make such an important decision when you have uncertainties.

I knew the best way to tackle these issues would be to find a mentor who had gone through the same decisions. The UGA Mentor Program is an incredible platform that allows students to connect with alumni who have the same passions and the experience to help you answer the questions you do not know. I remember looking through the available mentors, and Hunter immediately stuck out. We both came from rural Georgia to UGA; he graduated with the same degree I am pursuing, and took part in several organizations that I was involved in. Hunter and I both have a passion for the intersection of law and politics, and I knew he would be able to provide meaningful advice. The fact that he was in law school was helpful, and he has been able to deliver authentic answers to my law school questions.

Although our mentorship is relatively new, it is been an incredible experience. Hunter has reviewed my resume, advised me on internships, and shared about his personal journey behind attending law school. There was no awkward transition period once we matched, and we quickly began sharing our journeys and stories. A mentor is not there to have an answer to every question, but rather is a guidebook to share their journey and advice. There is a comfort in knowing that whenever I am facing a decision in my college career, I have someone in my corner one call away. I cannot recommend the UGA Mentor Program strongly enough; it is an incredible way to connect with professionals who can share a vast amount of knowledge and who want to see you succeed. It has shown me what a mentor is supposed to do and has prepared me to (hopefully) be a mentor after graduation so I can give back to a program that has given me so much.

Spring 2021 Mentorship Mondays to feature lineup of impressive UGA alumnae

The Women of UGA Leadership Council is pleased to announce the upcoming spring 2021 virtual Mentorship Mondays series! Sessions feature an alumna or a panel of alumnae, will last from Noon-1 P.M. and will address career development topics from fighting imposter syndrome to negotiating a promotion. After each session, there is an optional 30-minute breakout portion for participants to share their experiences and network with fellow Bulldogs.

Monday, February 22 – Living Your Authentic Purpose

In a session moderated by Janelle Nicole Christian (BBA ’11), founder of self-care platform Hey J. Nicole, the panelists will discuss values and passions, how those things guided their career and life decisions and how they reflect in their work today. Panelists include Wendi Carpenter (BS ’76), retired Navy Rear Admiral and founder and principal of Gold Star Strategies, and April Crow (BSEH ’95), vice president of external affairs and investor relations at Circulate Capital.

 

Monday, March 22 – You are a Rockstar: Imposter Syndrome and Moving Beyond It

In this session, Suzy Deering (BSFCS ’92), global chief marketing officer of Ford Motor Company, will discuss the internal experience of believing you are not as competent as others perceive you to be. She will discuss where she experienced self-doubt in her career journey and how she overcame it to lead with confidence and determination. Join us as we learn how to rise above our own doubts and support those in our networks struggling with imposter syndrome.

 

Monday, April 19 – Let’s Make a Deal: Job Offer and Promotion Negotiation Best Practices

In a session moderated by UGA professor and owner of Be Inspired Counseling and Consulting Dr. Marian Higgins (PHD ’11), our panelists will discuss best practices and advice in career negotiations. If you’re looking for advice regarding the job negotiation processes, don’t miss this program! Panelists for this session include Katie Comer (BSA ’13), Facebook community development regional manager, and Pam Roper (AB ’94), executive vice president and general counsel at Cousins Properties.

 

Monday, May 17 – Maria Taylor: My Career and the Importance of Mentorship

Maria Taylor (ABJ ’09, MBA ’13) joined ESPN as a college analyst and reporter in 2014. As one of the network’s most versatile commentators, Taylor became the first Black woman to co-host College GameDay in 2017, and was later chosen to be the sideline reporter for ABC Saturday Night Football. Taylor has covered the NBA Countdown, the NBA Draft, College Football Live, Big Monday and the NCAA Women’s Final Four. In the final session of Mentorship Mondays’ spring series, Maria will talk about her career journey, what she learned along the way, the role of mentorship and the importance of giving back.

A great and growing relationship (a tribute to mentorship)

Written by guest blogger Jackson Fox (BBA ’20) who, as an undergraduate, was paired with Annie Dawson (BBA ’08) through the UGA Mentor Program.

The UGA Mentor Program was the best thing I ever did to prepare for my career.

Going into my senior year, I expected the job search to be a breeze after completing a summer internship within the insurance industry. I fully expected to have a job locked down by December. However, the idea seemed to fade after the fall career fair passed, and I hadn’t secured a job. I thought I knew everything there was to know about the insurance field. As I was struggling with the job search, one of my friends suggested I look into the UGA Mentor Program. Little did I know, it would be the game changer in helping me explore job opportunities.

My mentor is Annie Dawson. From our first conversation, I knew that Annie truly cared for me and wanted to help me succeed. Annie is the director of underwriting, national binding authorities at RT Specialty, one of the largest insurance brokerages. I had no idea what it entailed to be a director of underwriting or what it was like to work for such a large insurance brokerage. This was the start of my humbling learning experience with Annie.

In our initial conversation, Annie immediately offered to set up a job shadowing opportunity at RT Specialty’s Atlanta office. Through this experience, I met with many professionals and learned more from them than I would have ever expected. Annie also went out of her way to set up a meeting between me and a broker at Marsh & McLennan Agency. My conversation with Annie’s contact allowed me to learn more about the different aspects of the insurance world.

Through the job shadowing opportunity, informational interview, and monthly conversations with Annie, she helped me hone my interests within the insurance industry and expanded my understanding of the field. With her help, I was able to turn my career aspirations into detailed and specific career goals. I now know that I want to become an insurance underwriter thanks to my mentor.

My relationship with Annie has been truly life changing. I can honestly say I did not know that I would benefit as much as I have from our mentoring relationship through the UGA Mentor Program. I can only imagine how I would have benefitted from this program had I joined my during my freshman year in college.

Thank you, UGA Mentor Program, for facilitating such a great relationship that aided in my personal and professional growth. Thank you, Annie Dawson, for bringing out the best in others and being such a wonderful person and mentor. Having you in my corner was the greatest reward of all.

Best wishes to Jackson as he continues his job search using the clarity gained from his mentor’s guidance. If you want to change a student’s life like Annie, join the UGA Mentor Program today!

 

 

International mentoring does a world of good

In honor of International Mentoring Day, a highlight of National Mentoring Month, the UGA Mentor Program is featuring a couple of our international mentors and mentees.

Finding common ground a world away

Matt Hodgson outside his work

After double majoring in criminal justice and psychology at UGA, Matt Hodgson (AB ’95) went on to earn a master’s degree in forensic science from George Washington University. He now lives in Brisbane, Australia, and works for the Queensland Police Service. He has always wanted to give back to UGA in some way, and the opportunity to mentor students was a perfect opportunity.

Hodgson says he was lucky to have a couple of great mentors in college, even though UGA didn’t have a campus-wide mentorship program at the time.

“You just had to find people who would take you under their wing,” he recalled. “I was lucky to strike up some friendships with faculty members. They gave me good advice—and not just about academics—also about career paths and just life itself. I’m hoping I can do the same for someone else.”

Hodgson has mentored two UGA students. One of those students, Gabrielle Fontaine (’22), explained that she chose to contact Hodgson through the UGA Mentor Program website because of her interest in forensic psychology and the fact that he was based internationally.

“The time difference and different seasons made for great conversation and broadened my knowledge of what life is like in Australia,” Gabrielle said. “Having him as a mentor allowed me to think about expanding my search to consider a career overseas.”

For Hodgson, mentoring is a way to stay involved with the Bulldog family.

“Mentoring brings together the perfect mix for me,” Hodgson said. “I am able, with experience and hindsight, to chat and help out students with career, study or other advice—plus I get to hear and share insights about UGA life and events.”

Gaining confidence one step at a time

Portrait of Kenny Lawal

As a UGA graduate student from Nigeria, Kehinde (Kenny) Lawal (’22) struggled to acclimate to the UGA system, which differed from her home country. She also felt inferior to others on campus. Joining the UGA Mentor Program inspired her.

“It has been rewarding for me to watch her confidence grow to match her abilities and qualifications,” said Lawal’s mentor, Alex Gomez (BSBCHE ’13). He goes on to sing her praises. “She is goal-oriented, proactive and extremely qualified to excel in whatever she does.”

In addition to looking to build her confidence, Lawal joined the UGA Mentor Program because she wanted to get a clear understanding of a career in the energy industry in the United States. “I was hoping I could get direction from someone with experience in that field,” she explained. “Alex has been so great in showing me where I was and where I needed to be by setting short- and long-term goals. He has also shown me opportunities available to me at UGA that I needed to take advantage of to build a brand for myself. My focus has shifted from just getting a degree to also leveraging relationships that matter. I am looking forward to being an impactful and friendly mentor, just as Alex Gomez has been to me.”

Creating a network for success

Portrait of Zada Smith

For Zada Smith (’21), who hails from the Bahamas, enrolling at UGA wasn’t her first experience living in Georgia, but she was still surprised by how much had changed since she was a child. She described the culture shock as immense.

“The hardest part about being at UGA was feeling socially disconnected,” said Smith. “It seemed as though everyone knew people from their high schools and had a success network surrounding them. Trying to find the courage to reach out to professors and make friends was tough.”

Smith found a safe haven in the UGA Mentor Program.

“I didn’t have the courage to reach out to someone and ask for mentoring,” she said, “but the UGA Mentor Program had a platform of mentors ready to help. It was a great way to learn about my field from someone established.”

Smith’s mentor Matthew Dials (BLA ’07) said, “Having an international mentee provided a unique perspective on the challenges some students face and how important the UGA network is for providing a support system to help them succeed.”

Connecting Bulldogs with Bulldogs

The UGA Mentor Program platform is well-suited to facilitating international connections. As communication takes place via text, email, phone or video conferencing, bridging distance is no problem.

“I suppose the biggest challenge has been trying to coordinate time zones and finding the right time to call for a chat,” Hodgson explained. “Australia is a day ahead of Georgia, so I’ll be calling in the morning and speaking to a mentee who is a day behind me in the afternoon.”

There are more than 2,600 mentors in the UGA Mentor Program. While the majority are located in the United States, there are mentors in 18 other countries. All program participants agree that preparation and planning are key to a successful mentoring relationship, whether international or not. The Mentor Program provides resources to help guide discussions, set goals, and get the best results from every interaction.

Happy New Year! Happy Mentor Month!

Happy New Year!

We hope that you enjoyed the holidays. The new year brings the start of a new semester, which means students will be looking for new alumni mentors. Now is the perfect time to become a UGA mentor. Or, if you’re already a mentor, please log in to the platform and to ensure your mentor profile is up-to-date.

Have you opted in to informational interviews? In November 2020, we rolled out an informational interview feature to provide you with another meaningful opportunity to connect with UGA students. With the introduction of informational interviews, you can determine if you have the capacity to mentor a student for 16 weeks and/or be available for 30-minute informational interviews. You are in the driver’s seat. Learn more about how your interactions with students can work around your schedule.

Happy Mentor Month!

January is National Mentoring Month, an opportunity to recognize the power of one-on-one relationships that help young people find and follow their passions, identify interesting career paths, and pursue their dreams. At the University of Georgia, we are celebrating all month with particular emphasis on these dates:

I am a UGA Mentor Day – January 7

On this day, we’ll celebrate the role UGA mentors play in empowering the leaders of tomorrow.

International Mentoring Day – January 15

Internationally, this day honors Muhammad Ali’s birthday (January 17) in recognition of his six principles (confidence, conviction, dedication, respect, giving and spirituality), which apply well to mentoring relationships. This year, we’ll celebrate on January 15 by acknowledging our international student mentees and the outstanding UGA mentors located around the globe.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service – January 18

MLK Day honors the memory of this great civil rights leader and elevates the spirit of service through volunteerism. If you have a mentee, this is a good day to reach out and share your volunteer experiences. Maybe you will bond over a cause in which you both believe.

I am a UGA Mentee Day – January 21

On this day, we’ll celebrate mentees. If you have a mentee or have had one in the past, take a moment to reach out to them and check in on how they are doing.

 

Stay updated on the UGA Mentor Program and follow along with National Mentor Month celebrations by following the UGA Mentor Program LinkedIn page or via the UGA Mentor Program Ambassadors’ Instagram account @ump_ambassadors.

 

ALSO HAPPENING IN JANUARY:

UGA Celebrates 60th Anniversary of Desegregation

Through a series of programs and events, the university will honor those who broke down barriers and transformed UGA beginning in 1961. Festivities will launch with a virtual program on January 9 and continue through February.

 

*Photo above taken prior to March 2020 and features UGA mentee Kevin Nwogu ’22 speaking with UGA mentor Raymond Phillips (BS ’12, MBA ’18).

Events

UGA Mentor 101

Undecided about becoming a mentor?
New mentor unsure about how to proceed?

 

UGA Mentor 101 is for you!

 
Join us for this webinar where you’ll hear from successful pairings, learn best practices for forming a strong connection and discover tips and tricks to becoming the best mentor you can be. Remember, the most important part of being a mentor is just being there for your mentee, and we’re here for you!

 

 

 

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