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Dawg-gone good gifts: Biolyte

For the health-conscious people in your life—or the ones who struggle to kick those holiday hangovers—fuel their fun with Biolyte, the IV in a bottle. 

Biolyte’s electrolytes match that of a 500mL IV, plus additional vitamins and minerals. It was formulated by Dr. Luther “Trey” Rollins, a board-certified anesthesiologist and pain specialist in Atlanta, GA. One bottle of Biolyte offers the fuel of 6.5 sports drinks to fight dehydration, fatigue, stomach illness, cramps or overindulgence.  

CEO and UGA alumna Jesslyn Rollins (BA ’15) partnered with Dr. Rollins, her father, to bring his product to the masses. After selling Biolyte out of the back of her car, she advanced to director of sales, chief sales and marketing officer and then CEO. Under her guidance, Biolyte has grown into a multimillion-dollar business. It’s no surprise that the 2022 Bulldog 100 recognized Biolyte as one of the fastest-growing organizations owned or operated by UGA Alumni.

Biolyte offers three flavors—berry, citrus and tropical—to help your friends and family quench their thirst, snap out of a funk or reenergize.  

You can purchase Biolyte at select retail locations or on Amazon 


The holidays have arrived! As you finish up your holiday shopping, we’re featuring UGA alumni-owned businesses that we can’t stop barking about. Give uniquely and support a Bulldog this holiday season with a Dawg-gone good gift.     

Want more Dawg-gone good gift ideas?

Dawg-gone good gifts: Svaha

For the genius in your life who wants to share their passion with everyone they meet, give a gift from Svaha.

Svaha USA is a one-stop-shop online retailer specializing in STEAM-themed apparel. 

Svaha’s mission is to shatter the gender stereotypes in the apparel industry and encourage STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and math) education for both girls and boys, and women and men. Svaha carries clothing for adults and children as well as a variety of accessories. 

Jaya Iyer (MS ’03) is an expert in the fashion industry. She teaches fashion buying and authored a widely-used textbook on fashion in emerging markets. When she couldn’t find space-themed clothing for her astronaut-aspiring daughter in 2015, she discovered an unmet need in the fashion industry. Svaha was born. The 2021 Bulldog 100 recognized Svaha as one of the fastest-growing organizations owned or operated by UGA alumni. 

For gifts that are out of this world, explore Svaha’s gift boxes, curated by topic. Svaha also offers matching family sets and puzzles celebrating biodiversity and women’s impact on history.   

Svaha’s curated marine biology box

You can find all that Svaha has to offer and shop by interest on Svaha’s online store.  


The holidays have arrived! As you finish up your holiday shopping, we’re featuring UGA alumni-owned businesses that we can’t stop barking about. Give uniquely and support a Bulldog this holiday season with a Dawg-gone good gift.     

Want more Dawg-gone good gift ideas?

Dawg-gone good gifts: Onward Reserve

For the people on your gift list who love the outdoors, college football and the South, look to one of Athens’ own: Onward Reserve. 

Onward Reserve is a specialty men’s apparel and lifestyle brand headquartered in Atlanta. The Onward Reserve experience mixes laid-back southern hospitality with a world-class retail atmosphere. Collections include men’s classic clothing, watches, shoes, sportswear and accessories. 

UGA alumni TJ Callaway (BBA’07) established Onward Reserve with the motto, “Live authentically.” During a hunting trip in Onward, Mississippi, Callaway crafted a vision for a brand that is laid-back, unwavering in quality and supportive of authentic experiences. Each season, Callaway carefully selects the collection of other brands with that vision in mind. The 2019 Bulldog 100 recognized Onward Reserve as one of the fastest-growing organizations owned or operated by UGA alumni. 

For the Dawg fan, give the gift of Red and Black with a Bulldog-printed polo ($115), a UGA needlepoint flask ($65) or a “Run the Damn Ball” hat ($34.95). For the outdoorsman, equip adventure with a new cooler or a pair of shades. For the well-dressed, browse the Thomasville collection.  

Give a fellow Bulldog some red and black with a UGA needlepoint flask from Onward Reserve ($65).

To explore Onward Reserve, you can shop online or visit one of Onward Reserve’s 12 locations throughout Georgia and the South.  


The holidays have arrived! As you finish up your holiday shopping, we’re featuring UGA alumni-owned businesses that we can’t stop barking about. Give uniquely and support a Bulldog this holiday season with a Dawg-gone good gift.     

Want more Dawg-gone good gift ideas?

Dawg-gone good gifts: SculptHouse

For the people on your gift list who live in athleisure attire, check out SculptHouse. 

SculptHouse is a fitness studio, activewear and lifestyle boutique with physical locations in Atlanta and Dallas and a robust online presence. It focuses on helping clients lead healthy, happy and confident lives through fitness and fashion. 

Founder and CEO Katherine Mason’s (ABJ ’12) built SculptHouse from her experience in New York City’s fitness industry. Mason launched SculptHouse to fill a void for effective, efficient workouts while also offering an extensive activewear line. SculptHouse Buckhead, its first location, opened in 2016, and a Dallas, Texas, location followed in 2019. This year’s 2022 Bulldog 100 recognizes SculptHouse as one of the fastest-growing organizations owned or operated by UGA alumni. 

SculptHouse sells everything you can think of when it comes to activewear: crop topsleggingslounge sets and more. SculptHouse also partners with Esseutesse to sell fringed-out, fun sneakers that ensure you’re putting your best foot forward.  

SculptHouse partners with Esseutesse to sell fringed-out, fun sneakers that ensure you’re putting your best foot forward.

 Browse SculptHouse gifts through the online store, or purchase a boutique gift card if you just can’t decide what to give. 


The holidays have arrived! As you finish up your holiday shopping, we’re featuring UGA alumni-owned businesses that we can’t stop barking about. Give uniquely and support a Bulldog this holiday season with a Dawg-gone good gift.     

Want more Dawg-gone good gift ideas?

Dawg-gone good gifts: Sock Fancy

For the person on your gift list who embraces style from head to toe, check out Sock Fancy. 

Whether you’re dressed for fashion, function or fitness, Sock Fancy covers it all. The company also offers beanies and face masks. Sock Fancy, based in Atlanta, has been featured by Esquire, FQ, RollingStone, Vogue and more.   

Stefan Lewsinger (AB ’11) co-founded Sock Fancy to change the way people talk about socks. Sock Fancy earned the title of “most subscribable” at the 2019 Bulldog 100 because of its unique sock subscription service delivering new socks to customers every month.  

 Between the Sock Fancy beanie ($18)brightly-designed crew socks ($14-54) or emoji-embroidered performance socks ($54), Sock Fancy has colors and patterns for everyone on your list.   

Want to give a gift that keeps on giving? Purchase a subscription that delivers fresh socks with fresh designs every month.  

Explore all that Sock Fancy has to offer on the online store.  


The holidays have arrived! As you finish up your holiday shopping, we’re featuring UGA alumni-owned businesses that we can’t stop barking about. Give uniquely and support a Bulldog this holiday season with a Dawg-gone good gift.     

Want more Dawg-gone good gift ideas?

Dawg-gone good gifts: Baylee Bakes

For the people on your gift list who can’t get enough of the Great British Baking Show, fulfill their sweetest dreams with custom-decorated sugar cookies from Baylee Bakes. 

Baylee Bakes’ founder and operator Baylee Marsh (BA ’20) never planned to own a cookie business. While studying advertising at UGA, a casual Instagram account featuring her cookies and a series of accidental cookie orders led Marsh to the UGA Entrepreneurship Program’s 2019 Summer Launch Program, where she won $5,000 in funding. Marsh hasn’t stopped baking since.  

Baylee Bakes offers holiday-inspired boxes of various sizes ($10-20). For the Dawg who bleeds red and black, gift a UGA Football half dozen box ($20). For the person on your list who wants to earn their treat, purchase a Christmas Cookie Decorating Kit ($18) or a Custom Paint Your Own Cookie set ($5) 

Give the gift of red and black with UGA-themed cookies from Baylee Bakes.

Looking for a holiday party idea? Book a private class with Baylee Bakes.  

To order custom cookies from Baylee Bakes, explore the website and submit a customer order request form. Once your order and timeline are confirmed, you can work out cookies designs and pricing. Then, pick up or receive your delivery order so you can share holiday cheer in the sweetest way possible. 


The holidays have arrived! As you finish up your holiday shopping, we’re featuring UGA alumni-owned businesses that we can’t stop barking about. Give uniquely and support a Bulldog this holiday season with a Dawg-gone good gift. 

Want more Dawg-gone good gift ideas?

Dawg-gone good gifts: Gently Soap

For the people on your gift list who know that skin-care is self-care, look to Kristen Dunning’s (BSA ’21) Gently Soap. 

Gently’s products are made for all skin types—even the most sensitive. With Dunning’s knowledge of plants, herbs, natural oils and soap-making, Gently crafts products that are sustainable and free of fragrance and essential oils. 

Dunning, founder and CEO of Gently Soap, studied agricultural communication at the University of Georgia. After battling irritation from skin and hair-care products, Dunning studied medicinal plants through the Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities. She put her knowledge into practice and  won $2,500 in startup capital from the UGA Entrepreneurship Program’s 2020 Idea Accelerator Demo Day contest. Dunning also won the spring 2021 Innovation District Quick Pitch Competition. 

A hand holds up a container of Gently Soap Whipped Body Butter

For a stocking stuffer, look to Gently’s original formula herbal soap Gardener Knauft’s ($9). For  the coffee-lover in your life, snag a bag of Gently x Jittery Joe’s Coffee Scrub ($25). And for that person who deserves a little extra TLC, gift Gently’s Herbal Whipped Body Butter ($30). 

To purchase Gently Soap, you can order online or find a store near you. 


The holidays have arrived! As you finish up your holiday shopping, we’re featuring UGA alumni-owned businesses that we can’t stop barking about. Give uniquely and support a Bulldog this holiday season with a Dawg-gone good gift.     

Want more Dawg-gone good gift ideas?

UGA Alumni Association reveals 2022 Bulldog 100 businesses

Athens, Georgia. – The University of Georgia Alumni Association has unveiled the 2022 Bulldog 100, a list of the 100 fastest-growing businesses owned or operated by UGA alumni. UGA received 367 nominations for the 2022 list.

The 2022 Bulldog 100 celebrates organizations from over two dozen industries, including agriculture, real estate, health care, nonprofits and software. Of the 100 businesses, 88 are located within the state of Georgia. In total, three countries and nine U.S. states are represented in this year’s Bulldog 100. 

This year’s list of fastest-growing businesses, in alphabetical order, is as follows: 

5Market Realty, Athens, Georgia
Abernathy Ditzel Hendrick Bryce LLC, Marietta, Georgia
Abound Wealth Management, Franklin, Tennessee
Abundance LLC, Monroe, Georgia
Ad Victoriam Solutions, Alpharetta, Georgia
Agora Vintage, Athens, Georgia
Akerna, Denver, Colorado
American Tank Maintenance LLC, Warthen, Georgia
Ansley Real Estate, Atlanta, Georgia
Architectural Fountains & Pools Inc., Atlanta, Georgia
Athens Real Estate Group, Athens, Georgia
Athens Talley Real Estate, Athens, Georgia
Backyard Escape Inc., Atlanta, Georgia
The Barnes Law Office LLC, Atlanta, Georgia
Baseline Surveying and Engineering Inc., Watkinsville, Georgia
Bates Animal Hospital, Watkinsville, Georgia
BIOLYTE, Canton, Georgia
Biren Patel Engineering, Macon, Georgia
Bitcoin Depot, Atlanta, Georgia
BOS Medical Staffing, Athens, Georgia
BOS Security Inc., Athens, Georgia
Breda Pest Management, Loganville, Georgia
BrightStar Care Cumming-Gainesville, Cumming, Georgia
The Brogdon Firm LLC, Atlanta, Georgia
BrokerHunter, Alpharetta, Georgia
Buckhead Preparatory School, Atlanta, Georgia
Cabo Luxury LLC, Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, Mexico
Caplan Cobb LLP, Atlanta, Georgia
Catapult Creative Media Inc., Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Chicken Salad Chick, Atlanta, Georgia
Cindy Lynn Dunaway Interiors, Atlanta, Georgia
Consume Media, Norcross, Georgia
Cozart Realty, Athens, Georgia
Creditors Bureau Associates, Macon, Georgia
DearthGalat LLC, Atlanta, Georgia
Dental ClaimSupport, Savannah, Georgia
Double Fun Watersports, Destin, Florida
Edwards & Hawkins LLC, Atlanta, Georgia
Elaine Burge, Sandersville, Georgia
Extra Special People Inc., Watkinsville, Georgia
Fairway Insurance Group Inc., Acworth, Georgia
Fiddleheads Garden Center, Dalton, Georgia
Globe Trotter Properties, Arlington, Virginia
Golden Isles Pharmacy, Brunswick, Georgia
Greater Athens Properties, Athens, Georgia
Grist Pallets LLC, Tifton, Georgia
Hager Design International Inc., Vancouver, BC, Canada
Hardy’s Peanuts Inc., Hawkinsville, Georgia
HatchWorks Technologies, Atlanta, Georgia
Highgate Partners LLC, Atlanta, Georgia
Impact Public Affairs, Atlanta, Georgia
inBrain, Atlanta, Georgia
Innovative Tax and Accounting Solutions LLC, Savannah, Georgia
J&M Pool Company, Senoia, Georgia
Langford Allergy LLC, Macon, Georgia
LeaseQuery, Atlanta, Georgia
Light from Light, Atlanta, Georgia
Lightnin RV Rentals, Lawrenceville, Georgia
Litner + Deganian, Atlanta, Georgia
Jeffrey Martin, CPA LLC, St. Simons Island, Georgia
Maggie Griffin Design, Gainesville, Georgia
Mark Spain Real Estate, Alpharetta, Georgia
Marketwake, Atlanta, Georgia
Martin Brothers LLC – Certified Public Accountants, Santa Rosa Beach, Florida
McMichael & Gray, PC, Peachtree Corners, Georgia
McNeal, Sports & Wilson Risk Advisers, Waycross, Georgia
Milestone Construction LLC, Athens, Georgia
Miller Veterinary Services, Conyers, Georgia
Murray Osorio PLLC, Fairfax, Virginia
Nuçi’s Space, Athens, Georgia
Offbeat Media Group, Atlanta, Georgia
ORS Companies, Athens, Georgia
OSC Edge, Atlanta, Georgia
Park Place Outreach Youth Emergency Services, Savannah, Georgia
PDI Software, Alpharetta, Georgia
PeopleSuite Talent Solutions, Mooresville, North Carolina
PharmD on Demand, Watkinsville, Georgia
Piedmont Equine Associates Inc., Madison, Georgia
Poole’s Pharmacy Inc., Marietta, Georgia
Precise Systems, Lexington Park, Maryland
Primrose School of Athens, Athens, Georgia
Rasmussen Wealth Management, Athens, Georgia
Rheos Nautical Eyewear, Charleston, South Carolina
Roadie, Atlanta, Georgia
Roberts Civil Engineering LLC, St. Simons Island, Georgia
Root Design Studio, Tucker, Georgia
SculptHouse, Atlanta, Georgia
Showpony, Augusta, Georgia
Smith Planning Group, Watkinsville, Georgia
Southern Belle Farm, McDonough, Georgia
Southern Straws Cheese Straws, Columbus, Georgia
The Spotted Trotter, Atlanta, Georgia
Stonehill, Atlanta, Georgia
TRUE Automotive, Lawrenceville, Georgia
Turknett Leadership Group, Atlanta, Georgia
TurnKey Compliance, Marietta, Georgia
Upgrade, San Francisco, California
W&A Engineering, Athens, Georgia
XY Planning Network, Bozeman, Montana 
YouthServ360 Inc. dba 7 Pillars Career Academy, Forest Park, Georgia

Each year, Bulldog 100 applicants are measured by their business’ compounded annual growth rate during a three-year period. The 2022 Bulldog 100 list is based on submitted financial information for 2018-20. The Atlanta office of Warren Averett CPAs and Advisors, a Bulldog 100 partner since the program began in 2009, verified the information submitted by each company. 

The UGA Alumni Association will host the annual Bulldog 100 Celebration Feb. 5, 2022, to celebrate these alumni business leaders and count down the ranked list to ultimately reveal the No. 1 fastest-growing business.  

“These alumni demonstrate the value of a degree from UGA, and we are proud to recognize them for all they have achieved as leaders and entrepreneurs,” said Meredith Gurley Johnson, executive director of the UGA Alumni Association. “These individuals serve as an example to current and future alumni of what is possible when tenacity and innovation are utilized to provide better solutions and build stronger communities. We are excited to engage these alumni with the university to continue to inspire leadership among our community.”  

To view the alphabetical list of businesses and to learn more about the Bulldog 100, see alumni.uga.edu/b100. 

Dugan Bridges’ (ABJ ’06) “distillery” helps entrepreneurs find the spirit of their idea

Dugan Bridges’ walk to work has, over the years, put him on bustling New York City sidewalks and Hollywood studio lots. Those walks through the global financial capital and the center of the entertainment universe taught him a lot and helped him grow. But it’s his walk to work today—past the Chapel, by the Arch and under the oak trees of North Campus—that he calls “heaven on earth.”

The Oconee County native came to UGA in 2002 with a strong interest in media production, so he set his sights on an ABJ in Telecommunication Arts. In his first three years at UGA, he took on a fairly high-profile extracurricular activity: the position of UGA Mic Man.

The Mic Man is a student who works to fire up Bulldog fans at football games. If you’ve watched or attended a game in Sanford Stadium and seen someone cheering, dancing, and screaming in front of the student section next to Hairy Dawg, you were looking at the Mic Man.

“I was baptized into college football and became a huge Georgia fan because of that,” said Dugan. “I traveled to all the games with the cheerleading team and the mascot. I ate with the athletes, I worked out with the athletes. It was an amazing experience.”

Dugan served as the Mic Man for three years, after which he focused on his major coursework and new extracurricular pursuits.

“I built relationships with people who are some of my best friends now, and we were making films on the side with whatever cameras I could get a hold of through the journalism school,” said Dugan. “I loved it, and I fell in love with UGA.”

Dugan, as Mic Man, leads the student section in Calling The Dawgs.

After graduating in 2006, Dugan headed for New York, where he found a job with a large marketing firm producing corporate videos for brands like Ford, Gillette and American Airlines. The work—though different from what he’d done in college—provided experience and connections.

It was also during this time that he met Jennifer, a New York-born woman who shared a surprising connection with Dugan.

“She loved that I was from Athens,” he said. “I couldn’t believe it. I was like, ‘How do you know about Athens?’ And I found out she was a big music fan, particularly REM. She said, ‘I read a book about them and the town they’re from, and I’ve always wanted to go there.’”

The future Mrs. Dugan Bridges would eventually get her wish. But for now, they were just dating, while Dugan and the college friends who accompanied him to New York continued to produce short films that were getting accepted to more and more film festivals.

In 2012, Dugan began eyeing a move to California. The prospect of leaving his college friends spurred the group to act on an idea they’d been kicking around since their Athens days. Financing was the big question, until someone suggested what was then a relatively unknown avenue for funding: Kickstarter.

“Time was running out, and it was the only shot we had,” said Dugan. “We thought we knew enough people, but movies are expensive, so this was the kind of favor you can only ask for once. We hoped that our network would show up, and thankfully, they did.”

“The Little Tin Man” became one of the first feature films to be funded by Kickstarter. The film premiered in 2013, was accepted to numerous film festivals around the country and eventually garnered interest from Gravitas Ventures and Amazon, who became its distributors.

Dugan and friends at an event for “The Little Tin Man”

By this time, Dugan and Jennifer had moved to Los Angeles, where the film’s success opened doors for Dugan as he began to pivot his career.

“In New York, I was doing more producing, some writing,” said Dugan. “But in LA, I was much more focused on pursuing writing and directing. The success of the film helped me meet working Hollywood screenwriters and producers and have them treat with me respect and not as some outsider.”

Those opened doors turned into a variety of opportunities for Dugan: mentors gained through writers groups, the chance to direct a fully funded short film, a position working for Robert Zemeckis, the award-winning director of “Forrest Gump” and the “Back to the Future” trilogy.

In 2016, Dugan and Jennifer welcomed their first child, Ronen. Dugan’s career continued to develop as Ronen did, but when his son took his first steps, Dugan’s perspective began to shift.

“As soon as he was able to start walking around, it was like I started having visions,” said Dugan. “For the first time in my adult life, a yard with green grass, a house, all that stuff really started to appeal to me.”

As Dugan’s interest in keeping his family in a one-bedroom apartment waned, his interest in returning to Georgia grew. But because of his work, leaving LA was a big decision.

“Ultimately, I realized that Hollywood is not a place—it’s a direction that you’re going,” said Dugan. “I realized I could go to Georgia, create, stay in contact with my networks in Los Angeles and New York, and help the community that’s growing here and has a desire to make something permanent.”

The Bridges family moved to Athens in 2018. Over the next year, Jennifer got a job with St. Mary’s Health Care System, Dugan got the pieces in place for a business, and Ronen got a brother. When Clark was born, the demands of home began to compete with the demands of work, and the family took a leap: Dugan would launch his business, and Jennifer would stay home with the kids.

Dugan with Jennifer and Clark

Dugan created F7 Film Distillery, a company that helps organizations and individuals refine the stories they share to their audiences. Dugan started F7 in his home, but reached out to UGA early on.

“I wanted to be in a creative environment, and I couldn’t think of a better one than on campus at UGA,” he said. “So, I put out some feelers, and the message I got was ‘This is a great idea, and we have something in the works, so we’ll get back to you.'”

That something was the Delta Innovation Hub. Located on Spring Street near downtown Athens, the Delta Innovation Hub is part of UGA’s Innovation District and hosts startup venture efforts, helps faculty become entrepreneurs, provides students the chance to work alongside UGA corporate partners and serves as the university’s front door for industry engagement.

In late 2020, Dugan was offered a space in the Hub, which opened earlier this year. In September, F7 Film Distillery officially moved in.

Dugan on the set of “Rubber Room,” a TV pilot he directed and co-wrote

Now, alongside his F7 work, Dugan is working with UGA student interns, sharing ideas with other start-ups in the building and preparing to take part in pitch competitions to help aspiring entrepreneurs sharpen and curate their ideas. And when he leaves work, he’s able to walk back under those North Campus oaks, by the Arch and past the Chapel on his way home, to a family that’s grown by two—Micah, 2, and Scarlett, 6 months—since they moved to Athens.

“When I moved back into town from LA and New York, I asked myself, ‘If I’m going to plant here for the next decade, how do I want to live it?’ And all I could think was, ‘I’d love to be back on campus,'” Dugan said. “There’s just so much energy. Surrounding yourself with these aspirational people takes you back to an aspirational time in your own life.

“That’s the environment I wanted to be in, and I found it.”

Where commitment meets community: Kristina Forbes (BS ’12) aligns global health initiatives

Kristina Forbes (BS ’12) wears many hats. As the vice president of operations for the Center for Global Health Innovation (CGHI), the University of Georgia alumna also works for an organization that addresses a broad topic with indeterminate reach: global health.

CGHI is an Atlanta-based nonprofit that represents over 250 organizations working together to address global health crises. CGHI also serves as the parent organization for several other entities such as the Global Health Crisis Coordination Center (GHC3), Georgia Bio and the Georgia Global Health Alliance.

With a broad role that comes with a wide reach, every day looks different for Forbes, from tackling information technology issues to planning a virtual awards dinner to directing overall strategy.

Forbes has always wanted to help people, but she never imagined that she would do it through science. She began her time at UGA as an education major but switched to psychology to better engage with people and understand the reasons behind their behavior.

Then Forbes participated in the Terry College of Business’s Institute for Leadership Advancement. While working with a nonprofit for the program’s service-learning project, Forbes found her passion for giving back.

Five days after graduating from UGA, Forbes started a job with the Atlanta Area Council of Boy Scouts of America. In this role, she found great purpose.

“I know what I was doing was making an impact,” Forbes said. “I know my work was important.”

Impact without borders

GHC3, a subsidiary of the Center for Global Health Innovation worked with other partners to donate 100,000 masks to health care workers in Zanzibar. This donation protected 310 doctors providing care to 350,000 people on the island.

Forbes’ current role with CGHI has provided ample opportunities to give back, especially as the COVID-19 pandemic brought public health into the spotlight across the globe.

“Nobody has gone untouched from this,” Forbes said.

Through CGHI and its many entities, national leaders have partnered to discuss how people can safely return to work, school and worship. A partnership with the Department of Public Health led to the development of the PAVE tool, which addresses equitable distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine.

CGHI’s work also addresses workforce development in life sciences industries and equips Georgia’s high school science teachers with educational equipment through a loaning program.

Although Forbes’ community impact has been concentrated in the state of Georgia, the work she does echoes across borders to address global issues.

“Health is a global issue,” Forbes said. “There is no border.”

A hub for global health’s future

The BioED Institute’s equipment depot, supported by the Center for Global Health Innovation, loans equipment and supplies to high school science teachers across the state of Georgia.

Because of the pandemic, global health has become a more prevalent topic in day-to-day life. And thanks to the presence of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, the city has gained traction as a center for public health.

CGHI and its affiliates will fuel this traction with the creation of a global health innovation district in midtown Atlanta. The facility will house offices, laboratories, meeting spaces and a crisis center to help align global health efforts led by nonprofits and corporations.

Through her work with CGHI, Forbes is committed to improving global health initiatives and engagement with community.

“To me, commitment is being engaged,” Forbes said. “I’m committed to creating better health outcomes for everybody.”


WHERE COMMITMENT MEETS COMMUNITY

Whether life takes them to new cities or to the neighborhoods where they grew up, Georgia Bulldogs do more than get jobs – they elevate their communities. Bulldogs lead nonprofits, effect change and create opportunities for others. Wherever people are suffering, wherever communities are looking for effective leaders and whenever the world cries out for better solutions, Bulldogs are there to answer the call to service. It’s more than our passion. It’s our commitment.

Caroline Odom, an intern with UGA’s Division of Development and Alumni Relations, brings you a spring blog series that celebrates Bulldogs who embrace that commitment to helping others in their communities thrive.

Want to read about other Bulldogs impacting their communities?