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The sweetest surprise on campus: the UGA Creamery

Do you remember visiting the Creamery on campus? Maybe you stopped in for a coffee before your plant biology lab, or for an ice cream cone to celebrate the end of the week. With its convenient location and variety of goodies, the Creamery remains a notable spot on the University of Georgia’s campus.

Since 1908, students and faculty alike have enjoyed the sweet treats of the UGA Creamery. Its original purpose was to serve as a resource for teaching dairy science students about production.

Once the Creamery started serving ice cream, customers couldn’t get enough. “I can remember walking to the creamery with my friends and getting an ice cream for 10 cents,” said Stephanie Dobbins (AB ’91).

Customers checking out at the Creamery

When the Creamery moved to Conner Hall in 1941, it became the main provider of dairy products for the entire Athens area. At the time, it was the only full dairy production plant in the entire state.

Mike Hobbs (AB ’72) recalls the Creamery having “both ice cream and cheese” while he was attending UGA.

Creamery price list

The Creamery has moved around quite a bit from its original location, first to the basement of Conner Hall and then to today’s location in the Environmental Health Science Building.

Creamery to-go bag

Due to budget cuts in the 1990s, the dairy production plant closed and the Creamery began serving Edy’s soft serve and Mayfield ice cream. However, the change hasn’t affected the abundance of customers who flock to the Creamery’s shady outdoor tables to study and enjoy some ice cream.

“When I went there, it wasn’t super hot outside, so I just sat at the bench outside with one of my friends and we got to enjoy the weather,” said Kate Coriell ’21.

UGA Students enjoy an ice cream from the Creamery

Julia Strother ’20, a fellow UGA intern, joined me on a trip to the Creamery to give our Instagram followers a sneak peek at what the Creamery is like today. Watch our Instagram story from Monday, July 22, or stop by the Creamery yourself during your next visit to the Classic City!

Location and Hours:

101 Dairy Science Building
Monday-Friday // 7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Click here for directions.

Top 10 picnic spots at UGA

June 18 is apparently International Picnic Day. If you’re like those of us at the UGA Alumni Association, you love a good reason to 1) get outside, 2) eat delicious food, and 3) spend time with fellow Bulldogs.

So today, we are proud to bring you our top 10 list of places to picnic on the University of Georgia campus.

1. Herty Field

Herty Field is home to Herty Fountain and is near the UGA Chapel Bell, so you’re likely to enjoy the sound of celebration as you picnic here. Lay out a blanket on the lawn in front of Moore College or snag a nearby solar-powered picnic table. And don’t forget a Frisbee or football!

2. With Bernard Ramsey

Enjoy your picnic on the bench alongside a statue of Bernard Ramsey, one of UGA’s most generous benefactors. Located on North Campus, just outside of Moore College, good ol’ Bernard is always willing to picnic with students, faculty, staff and visitors. Bonus: you can complete a tradition in the G Book, UGA’s official traditions guide, while you eat!

3. Lake Herrick

Lake Herrick is situated within Oconee Forest Park and adjacent to UGA’s Rec Sports Complex. It provides opportunities for recreation, research and experiential learning. Bring your picnic and afterward, consider taking a walk, trail running, fishing or birdwatching. You can even bring your own canoe, kayak or paddleboard to enjoy the lake. This is a true oasis within the Classic City.

4. State Botanical Garden of Georgia

The State Botanical Garden of Georgia is free to visit and there’s plenty of complimentary parking. UGA Public Service and Outreach oversees the garden, which seeks to inspire an appreciation of nature in visitors of all ages. Find your ideal picnic spot in the Flower Garden, Heritage Garden, greenhouses, Alice H. Richards Children’s Garden, Hummingbird Trail, International Garden, Shade and Native Flora Gardens, and Trails and Nature Areas. Prefer to be indoors, check out the Tropical Conservatory.

5. Memorial Garden or Head Terrace

The Memorial Garden is located in the geographic heart of UGA, just outside of the Miller Learning Center, along Sanford Drive. It is an oasis of trees and stone in remembrance of those from UGA who have given their lives in service to our country. Bring a picnic or pick up a bite from the Bulldog Café in the Tate Student Center, and enjoy it while watching students pass by en route to class. Just around the corner is the Jacqueline and John Head Terrace, an outdoor amphitheater-style space on the north side of the Miller Learning Center.

6. North Campus

North Campus, a U.S. National Register of Historic Places, graces the front of many UGA brochures and directly faces downtown Athens. This grassy expanse is our version of the stereotypical “college quad” and is surrounded by numerous historical buildings, including the UGA Chapel, Old College and the Main Library. Snag a spot under a large oak tree and watch as students, faculty, staff, and visitors pass by (or through) the iconic Arch as they enter and exit campus.

7. Latin American Ethnobotanical Garden

Snag a picnic table in this garden just south of Baldwin Hall. Opened in 1998, the garden is managed by UGA’s Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute and emphasizes the field of ethnobotany, the study of the relationship between people and plants. Word is that there is sometimes even live music taking place in the garden.

8. Founders Memorial Garden

Nestled between Lumpkin Street and North Campus, this garden was the brainchild of Hubert Owens, the founder and first dean of UGA’s landscape architecture program. It features a variety of plants and design styles for teaching, an arboretum in remembrance of those who died in WWII, Lumpkin House, the Boxwood Garden sundial, a time capsule that will be opened in 2091, and an arbor that shades a bench. Featured on p. 36 of the Summer 2018 issue of Georgia Magazine.

9. W. Brooks Mall

The D.W. Brooks Mall is located on South Campus, near the new Science Learning Center. The open green space is perfect for a picnic—followed by a cone from the UGA Creamery (another tradition in the UGA G Book).

10. Between the Hedges

Okay, trick answer. It’s not actually possible to picnic on the (soon to be Dooley) field in Sanford Stadium … but you have to admit, it would be pretty cool.

UGA named No. 13 Best Public University by U.S. News & World Report

As University of Georgia alumni and friends strengthen their commitment to UGA year over year, the world is taking notice—U.S. News & World Report named UGA No. 13 on its list of 2019 Best Public Universities.

This ranking (up three spots from last year’s ranking) represents the power of the ever-increasing support UGA has received in the last several years, particularly from alumni—in fact, a “loyal alumni participation number” factors into the U.S. News & World Report ranking.

Our alumni’s support is critical to UGA’s success, and the stronger UGA becomes, the more accomplished and engaged our alumni become. Yvette Dupree (BBA ’03, MAT ’07, PHD ’12), a member of the Young Alumni Council, is an example of our motivated alumni who understand this well.

“The Young Alumni Council wants alumni to realize that their gifts are vitally important to the university’s ranking and our reputation around the world,” said Yvette. “The better the ranking, the better it is for alumni. It’s a win-win.”

“The Young Alumni Council wants alumni to realize that their gifts are vitally important to the university’s ranking and our reputation around the world. The better the ranking, the better it is for alumni. It’s a win-win.”

Alumni organizations like these empower our alumni and, in turn, empower the university. Our alumni chapters are ready to welcome Georgia Bulldogs all over the world, help them stay connected to UGA, and make sure they never bark alone.

To those who have made a gift to UGA in the last year, thank you for your continued commitment to your alma mater. If you have not already made a gift, please learn more about the Commit to Georgia Campaign and consider making a gift today to count in upcoming rankings.

UGA gardens recognized as some of Georgia’s most charming landscapes

One of the finest things about UGA is its breathtaking landscapes. The book “Seeking Eden: A Collection of Georgia’s Historic Gardens” features three of UGA’s most recognized green spaces — the President’s House and Garden, the Founders Memorial Garden and North Campus.

Seeking Eden Authors

“Seeking Eden,” written by Staci L. Catron and Mary Ann Eaddy, takes readers through the rich history and current appearance of 30 Georgia gardens in detail and alongside beautiful imagery, photographed by James R. Lockhart. The highlighted landscapes were first recognized in the early 20th century publication, “Historic Gardens of Georgia, 1733-1933,” published by Peachtree Garden Club.

Seeking Eden book cover

The publishing of “Seeking Eden” was supported by a $75,000 gift from the Mildred Miller Fort Foundation in Columbus, Georgia. All proceeds from the book sales will benefit the Garden Club of Georgia’s Historic Landscape Preservation grants and scholarship program.

Order your copy of “Seeking Eden: A Collection of Georgia’s Historic Gardens” on UGA Press today.

UGA names building for Sanford and Barbara Orkin

This article was originally published on UGA Today on February 15, 2018.

Writer: David Dodson, Terry College of Business (ABJ ’89)

Third and final phase of the Business Learning Community will open in 2019

The next building to become part of the University of Georgia Terry College of Business will be named for Sanford and Barbara Orkin of Atlanta.

The University System of Georgia Board of Regents has approved naming one of the two buildings currently under construction in the third and final phase of the Business Learning Community for the Orkins in recognition of their longstanding support of UGA, including a $5 million gift to the Terry College of Business.

“Sanford and Barbara Orkin’s tremendous generosity will leave an enduring legacy at the University of Georgia,” said President Jere W. Morehead. “Their latest gift, which will further enhance the learning environment on our campus, demonstrates their unyielding commitment to supporting the endeavors of our students, faculty and staff.”

The building to be named Sanford and Barbara Orkin Hall—located at the corner of Baxter and Hull streets—will include a large auditorium, undergraduate classrooms, a behavioral lab, a computer lab for marketing research, interview suites and faculty and administrative offices.

“Throughout this building campaign and the construction that followed, creating a modern and vibrant learning community for the Terry College of Business has been our primary goal,” said Dean Benjamin C. Ayers. “We are so grateful to the Orkins for their philanthropic investment in the college’s future, and we look forward to opening and dedicating the final two buildings of the Business Learning Community next year.”

Sanford and Barbara Orkin both attended UGA. Drafted into military service while still a student, Sanford Orkin joined his family’s pest control business after returning from the Korean War and served as president. Following the sale of Orkin Pest Control to Rollins Inc. in 1964, he maintained real estate and business interests in Atlanta and volunteered his time and support to UGA in numerous ways, including as a trustee of the UGA Foundation and UGA Real Estate Foundation.

“Barbara and I love the University of Georgia and are so pleased to continue our support of its academic mission to educate future leaders for the state and nation,” Sanford Orkin said.

The Orkins’ most recent gift extends a remarkable legacy of giving to UGA. The couple has endowed a $1 million scholarship fund for low-income students, a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar position in the Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases and supported the School of Law, the College of Education, the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, the College of Public Health, UGA Athletics and other academic initiatives.

Phase III of the Business Learning Community is currently under construction. Phase II was completed in 2017.

The university broke ground on Phase III construction of the Business Learning Community in October 2017 after the dedication of Amos Hall, Benson Hall and Moore-Rooker Hall. Terry College faculty and staff moved into the Phase II buildings last summer, and classes began this past fall. Phase I (Correll Hall) was funded entirely by private contributions and opened in 2015. Phase II and III are the result of a public-private partnership between the state of Georgia and hundreds of donors. The Business Learning Community represents one of the largest capital projects in the University System’s history.

UGA reports 96 percent career outcomes rate for Class of 2017

This article was originally published on UGA Today on February 15, 2018.

Writer: Danielle Bezila

Results are 11 percent higher than the national average

University of Georgia research shows that 96 percent of recent graduates are employed or continuing their education within six months of graduating. UGA’s career outcomes rate for the Class of 2017 is 11 percent higher than the national average.

Of those students:
• 63 percent were employed full time;
• 20 percent were attending graduate school; and
• Approximately 12 percent were self-employed, interning full time or were employed part time.

“UGA’s high career outcomes rate demonstrates our university’s commitment to providing students with opportunities to learn in and beyond the classroom,” said Scott Williams, executive director of the Career Center. “Combined with our strong academics, the experiential learning requirement provides students with hands-on experiences, such as internships, equipping them with the skills and experiences that make them more competitive in the job market.”

The UGA Class of 2017 was hired by 2,925 unique employers, including Fortune 500 companies, across all 50 states and in 37 countries. Of the full-time employed graduates, 72 percent accepted employment within Georgia. Top employers for the Class of 2017 include AT&T, Chick-fil-A, IBM, Georgia-Pacific and UPS.

“Our state benefits from being home to so many successful companies—companies that want to hire our students,” said Jill Walton, UGA’s executive director of corporate and foundation relations. “UGA is committed to serving our state through educating tomorrow’s leaders.”

These graduates are working in all sectors of the economy—66 percent in business, 24 percent in education, 6 percent in government and 4 percent in nonprofits.

“UGA students are pursuing careers in diverse industries, career areas and geographic locations,” Williams said. “We are proud that our students continue to secure positions with top companies, as well as enter highly selective graduate and professional programs.”

The 20 percent of graduates who are continuing their education are attending top graduate schools such as Columbia University, Duke University, Emory University, Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

CareerOutcomes-Infographic-Classof2017_Page_2-1140x1440

UGA’s career outcomes rate for the Class of 2017 is 11 percent higher than the national average.

The career outcomes rate is the percentage of students who are employed, continuing their education or not seeking employment within six months after graduation. The UGA Career Center calculates the career outcomes rate each January by leveraging information from a variety of sources. This year, the Career Center was able to collect data on 88 percent of 2017 graduates, 26 percent higher than the national average, which helps provide a more accurate snapshot of UGA students’ employment status. Outcomes data was collected using the following sources: survey, phone calls, employer reporting, departmental collaboration, LinkedIn and the National Student Clearinghouse.

More details about UGA’s Class of 2017 career outcomes, is online.

More about hiring UGA graduates is online.

Do you want to help support student success at UGA and ensure students are prepared for professional interviews? Make a gift to the Dawgs Suit Up Scholarship, which allows students to attend the Dawgs Suit Up Event and receive professional interview attire free of charge from JCPenney.

UGA Career Center 
The University of Georgia Career Center provides a range of services, helping students identify potential careers, connecting them with employers for job interviews and internships and much more. The Career Center’s home, Clark Howell Hall, provides spaces for career advising, networking events and job interviews.

Bulldog Love Stories

Celebrate UGA’s 233rd anniversary

In recognition of the university’s anniversary as the birthplace of public higher education in America, the UGA Alumni Association and Student Alumni Association host a weeklong celebration. The highlight of the week is the annual Founders Day Lecture, which is sponsored by the Office of the President, Provost’s Office, UGA Alumni Association and the Emeriti Scholars, a group of retired faculty members known for their teaching abilities, who continue to be involved in the university’s academic life through part-time teaching, research and service assignments. Held in the UGA Chapel, this event has become a Founders Day tradition, drawing alumni, students, faculty, esteemed guests and members of the community.

The lecture is open to the public and free to attend. Marshall Shepherd, Georgia Athletic Association Distinguished Professor, associate head of the Department of Geography and director of programs in Atmospheric Sciences, will present the 2018 lecture.

In addition to the lecture, the UGA Student Alumni Association and Student Alumni Council host a variety of free Founders Week events and giveaways for students to celebrate the day UGA became the birthplace of public higher education in America.

Monday, January 22

  • Founders Week T-shirt giveaway* on Tate north lawn from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
  • Founders Day Lecture given by Marshall Shepherd, Georgia Athletic Association Distinguished Professor, associate head of the Department of Geography and director of programs in Atmospheric Sciences, at 1:30 p.m. in the UGA Chapel.

Tuesday, January 23

  • #TraditionTuesday at the Abraham Baldwin statue from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
  • 100 Days ‘Til Graduation in Memorial Hall from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Wednesday, January 24

  • President Morehead’s State of the University Address in the UGA Chapel at 3:30 p.m.
  • 100 Days ‘Til Graduation in Memorial Hall from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Thursday, January 25

  • Founders Week Banner Contest

Friday, January 26

  • Founders Day Celebration in Tate Plaza from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

*Students must be a member of the Student Alumni Association to receive a T-shirt

Five reasons the University of Georgia is an academic powerhouse

As the Bulldogs head into the SEC championship, see why UGA is winning both on the field and in the classroom.

This story was originally published by the Division of Marketing and Communications..

1. Our students love it here. Four students apply for every spot in our first-year class and 96 percent return for their second year, well above the 61 percent return national average rate. Oh, and for those four out of every 100 who don’t return, we wish them well because that’s the kind of place we are.

2. Our students love it even when they do leave. A whopping 95 percent of our graduates are either employed or attending graduate school within six months of graduation, well above the national average (that makes moms and dads happy, too!).

3.  We’re a trend-setter in higher education. We’re the largest public university nationwide to provide every undergraduate student a hands-on learning experience and we’ve launched more than 100 “Double Dawgs” degree programs where students earn undergraduate and graduate degrees in five years or less and save money.

4. Our students are smart and they thrive. This year, our enrolling first-year students averaged a straight “A” GPA (yes, that’s 4.0), a 1344 SAT score, and 30 ACT score (there’s really nothing average about any of that). In the past 20 years, we’ve been one of the top three public universities producing Rhodes Scholars because of our dogged focus on enhancing the learning environment — for all our talented students.

5. We’re strong academically and athletically. Forbes ranked us No. 17 in its 2017 list of top colleges that dominate academically and athletically.  We’re ranked as the 16th best national public research university by U.S. News & World Report. We are one of only 10 public universities ranked in the top 20 among Division I schools in both academics and athletics.

Five University of Georgia alumni to be recognized for civic service

WriterEmily Webb

This story was originally published by UGA Today on November 6, 2017.

Five University of Georgia alumni will be honored November 17 at the university’s Tucker Dorsey Blue Key Alumni Awards Banquet.

The event will take place at Mahler Hall in the UGA Center for Continuing Education and Hotel. The 6:30 p.m. reception will be followed by dinner at 7:30 p.m.

Attorney C. Randall Nuckolls, hospital association executive Susan C. Waltman and UGA administrator Victor K. Wilson will receive the Blue Key Service Award. Honors Program director David S. Williams will receive the Blue Key Faculty Service Award. Physician Matthew T. Crim, who also is a faculty member with the Augusta University/University of Georgia Medical Partnership, will be presented with the Blue Key Young Alumnus Award.

Recipients of the AT&T Student Leadership Award, the Richard B. Russell Student Leadership Award and the Tucker Dorsey Memorial Scholarship will be announced during the banquet. The 2017-2018 Blue Key initiates also will be recognized.

The Blue Key Honor Society is a national organization whose members are committed to leadership in student life, high scholastic achievement, service to others and citizenship. Established in 1924 at the University of Florida, the organization’s second chapter was established at UGA in 1926.

The award recipients are:

Randall Nuckolls

Nuckolls is a partner in the Washington, D.C., office of Dentons US LLP. He previously served as chief counsel and legislative director for U.S. Sens. Herman Talmadge and Sam Nunn. Since leaving Capitol Hill, Nuckolls has served as Washington counsel for the University of Georgia, assisting with federal government relations initiatives and building relationships with Congress and the executive branch.

Nuckolls has helped devise strategies to bring infrastructure dollars to UGA for buildings, secure research funding from various federal agencies and transfer federal properties. He also helped to advance President Jere W. Morehead’s priorities of establishing UGA’s Honors in Washington and Washington Semester programs, as well as UGA’s residential facility, Delta Hall.

Nuckolls is a member and past chair of the Society of International Business Fellows and a member of Leadership Georgia. He currently serves on the board of the Georgia Agribusiness Council, the Georgia 4-H Foundation, Wesley Theological Seminary and the Georgia State Society of Washington, D.C. The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities recently presented him its Outstanding Achievement Award for his contributions in counseling the higher education community on federal ethics law.

Nuckolls received his bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics from UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in 1974 and his Juris Doctor from the UGA School of Law in 1977. An active alumnus, he has served as president of the Law School Association and on the advisory board of the Honors Program. He currently is a member of the Board of Visitors for the School of Public and International Affairs. He is a past recipient of CAES’ Alumni Award of Excellence, the J.W. Fanning Distinguished Professional Award from the college’s agricultural economics department and the Georgia 4-H Green Jacket Award. In 1987, he received the Blue Key Young Alumnus Award.

Susan Waltman

Waltman is the executive vice president for legal, regulatory and professional affairs and general counsel for the Greater New York Hospital Association, which represents the interests of 150 hospitals and health care systems across the New York region. Prior to joining GNYHA in 1987, she was general counsel for the Medical College of Pennsylvania as well as an associate in the Philadelphia office of Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP.

Waltman serves on the boards of the UGA Foundation and the UGA Research Foundation. In addition, she is a committee member for the university’s Commit to Georgia Campaign to raise $1.2 billion.

A volunteer ambassador for UGA in the New York area, Waltman shares her insights about UGA’s commitment to excellence with fellow alumni. She also has served on the advisory boards of the university’s Honors Program and College of Public Health, where she has helped support internships, scholarships and public health outreach. She hosts UGA interns at GNYHA each summer.

Waltman graduated from the University of Georgia with a bachelor’s degree in sociology in 1973 and a master’s degree in social work in 1975. She earned her Juris Doctor from Columbia University Law School in 1977.

Victor Wilson

Prior to his appointment as vice president for student affairs at UGA in 2013, Wilson served for nine years as executive vice president for student affairs at the College of Charleston. He previously was assistant to the president and associate vice president for student affairs at UGA. In addition, he held student affairs leadership positions at Agnes Scott College and Northern Arizona University. He began his career in higher education at UGA in 1983 as director of orientation and assistant director of admissions.

Wilson has written numerous articles and given presentations on issues of race, ethics, crisis management, student life and staff development in higher education. He has held leadership roles in several national organizations, including the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, the National Orientation Directors Association and Student Affairs Professionals in Higher Education. He also serves on the national board of directors for Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity and the local board of directors for the St. Mary’s Healthcare System.

Wilson currently oversees a Student Affairs division of 18 departments and more than 600 staff members dedicated to enriching student learning and supporting student development and growth. He currently co-chairs the President’s Task Force on Student Learning and Success, which is charged with identifying opportunities to enhance the educational experience for UGA students, both inside and outside the classroom. Wilson earned his bachelor’s degree in social work and master’s degree in education from the University of Georgia in 1982 and 1987, respectively.

David Williams

Williams has served since 2004 as associate provost and director of the Honors Program, where he holds the Jere W. Morehead Distinguished Professorship. The first director also to be an alumnus of the UGA Honors Program, Williams earned an undergraduate degree as well as a master’s degree from the University of Georgia in 1979 and 1982, respectively. After receiving his doctorate and teaching at universities in Ohio, he returned to his alma mater as a faculty member in the religion department in 1989. He became department head in 2002.

Williams has published widely in the fields of biblical, Jewish and religious studies, including three books, numerous journal articles and other publications. He has received several awards and honors related to teaching at UGA, including the Richard B. Russell Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award, the Sandy Beaver Award for Excellence in Teaching and the Sandy Beaver Teaching Professorship. He also holds the Josiah Meigs Distinguished Teaching Professorship, UGA’s highest honor for teaching excellence.

Williams serves as UGA’s faculty representative for nationally competitive fellowships, such as the Rhodes, Marshall, Goldwater, Truman and Udall scholarships. He also oversees the student Fulbright scholarship process for UGA. Since he began serving in this capacity, nearly 250 students have been selected for these and other prestigious awards.

Matthew Crim

Crim is a cardiologist for the Piedmont Heart Institute and an assistant professor of medicine with the AU/UGA Medical Partnership. In addition to his clinical practice and teaching responsibilities, he is engaged with the development of health policy through research and administrative activities at the local and national levels, with a focus on value-based payment reforms and patient outcomes.

Crim earned a bachelor’s degree in cellular biology and a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Georgia in 2005. A Foundation Fellow, he became the first UGA student to win both a Truman Scholarship and Marshall Scholarship.

He used the Truman Scholarship to pursue his interest in health policy. Through the support of the Marshall Scholarship, he completed a master’s degree in health policy, planning and financing offered jointly by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the London School of Economics and Political Science, as well as a master’s degree in medical ethics and law from King’s College London.

He earned his medical degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 2011 and completed internal medicine residency training at Johns Hopkins Hospital followed by a cardiovascular disease fellowship at Emory University.