Leveling the playing field

In honor of Autism Acceptance Month, the UGA Mentor Program is focusing on what it means to be neurodivergent and is emphasizing how asking for accommodations is not seeking an unfair advantage—it is simply gaining equal footing.

Meet Scott Frasard (BBA ’03, MED ’06, PHD ’11)

Scott’s higher education journey was atypical, even before he realized he was neurodivergent. He didn’t enroll in college until 12 years after graduating from high school–first working as an EMT and then paramedic. Even then, he went to school part time while continuing to work full time, eventually becoming a member of the first graduating class from UGA’s Gwinnett Campus. His college experience piqued an interest in adult education, so he continued to commute to the Gwinnett campus in pursuit of a Master of Education. He then moved to Athens to take courses on UGA’s main campus, eventually earning a Ph.D. in adult education.

It wasn’t until two years ago that he learned of his autism. The formal identification sent him on a journey of discovery.

“It was definitely a learning curve for me,” said Scott. “I had to become comfortable with my autism first, before sharing with others.” Scott turned to the internet. Reframing Autism, a website for an Australian nonprofit organization, has proven helpful. So has the Autism Self Advocacy Network website.

Even though he comes from a medical background, Scott found he was more comfortable with the identity-first descriptors for his autism versus the traditional medical point of view, preferring a statement like “We are autistic” to “We have autism.”

Scott says, “Autism is my identity. You can’t separate me from my autism. Saying ‘We have autism’ implies illness and disability, and that there is something wrong with us. We are not less; we are simply wired differently.”

Leveling the playing field

Learning he was autistic after nearly 30 years of teaching prompted Scott to reevaluate his teaching practices and make changes to be inclusive of neurodivergent learners. This includes creating a safe space in his classroom—an environment that is welcoming to all. He encourages students to talk about what they need up front before it becomes a problem. He shares things about himself to make students more comfortable to talk about themselves.

“I prepare others to expect ‘stimming’ or self-soothing behaviors they might see me do to help regulate my emotions,” explains Scott. He alerts people to his bluntness and explains that they should not perceive it as rudeness; he is simply getting straight to the point. Scott notes that because he interprets language extremely literally, he has learned to ask lots of clarifying questions. These advanced explanations help stem frustration on both sides of his interactions with others. Scott has learned to have these conversations not only with his students, but with his co-workers as well.

“In the hiring process for my last job, I was up front with HR and the hiring managers,” said Scott. “It helped them understand why I asked for what I needed and why these were reasonable accommodations.”

Scott is extremely sensitive to external stimuli. Sounds and movements easily distract him. They grab attention away from what he wants to focus on and create anxiety. For instance, fluorescent lights that flicker and buzz—something neurotypical people ignore or don’t even notice—are quite disruptive. So, Scott works remotely from his home. Like many autistic people, Scott is an introvert. His co-workers understand his need to block out time in his calendar to prepare for and/or decompress from meetings.

Bringing his experience to the Mentor Program

As a mentor in the UGA Mentor Program, Scott uses his experience to help students navigate their UGA journeys. He wants to empower students to ask for what they need from the start.

“Professors understand that to truly measure what someone has learned, they have to remove the barriers that disrupt the measurement,” Scott said. “If students need more time to process test questions and need a quiet environment in which to concentrate, these are not bonuses. They are not asking for extra; they’re seeking equal opportunity to perform at their best.”


Your uniqueness is valuable.

Your experiences may help a student on their UGA journey. Discover how fulfilling being a mentor can be.


Learn more.

Find out what it means to be neurodivergent and how you can be an ally to the autistic community. UGA Mentor Program Ambassador Cassie Turner, Class of 2022, sat down for a discussion with Scott in an episode of RealTalk, the UGA Mentor Program’s podcast.


Know a student struggling at UGA?

Scott is just one amazing professional available to serve as a mentor. In fact, the Mentor Program platform makes it easy for students to search through thousands of experienced faculty, staff and alumni mentors to find someone who matches their interests and background and can relate to their strengths and challenges.

The Jerry Tanner Show – SEC Championship: Alabama

Repeat after me: it is not 2008, 2012, 2015, 2018, or 2020, and we are NOT going to freak out over a team that beat Auburn and Florida by 2.

These next games you’ll definitely want to watch with as many Bulldogs as possible. Find a game-watching party near you at alumni.uga.edu/football.

Jerry Tanner is everyone you’ve ever met at a UGA tailgate, everyone who’s ever talked about Georgia football by your cubicle, and every message board poster who claims to have a cousin who cut Vince Dooley’s grass. He’s a UGA alumnus, he’s a college football fanatic with a Twitter addiction, and he’s definitely a real person and not a character played by Clarke Schwabe.

January 2022: Job Search Week

With a new year comes the chance to realize your career goals. Let us help you move your career forward in 2022. During Job Search Week (January 24-28), UGA’s Alumni Career Services will host webinars with top career coaches, human resource professionals and certified resume writers. These job search strategy experts will demonstrate how to masterfully execute each step of your job search.

NOTE: All webinars are from 1 to 2 p.m. EST. You must register for each webinar individually.

Monday, Jan. 24

Mastering the Stages of Change-Mindsets for Career Changers

Wonder why change is so difficult? In this workshop, you’ll explore the change process, discover what stage you are at in your job search, and why you might feel stuck. You’ll become empowered in your job search by learning how to combat resistance to change and make the career move you need.

 

Tuesday, Jan. 25

Job Searching in 2022

Do you want a new job but you’re unsure how to proceed? Does a successful job search seem overwhelming? You’re not alone. We understand these difficulties and will help you put your best foot forward in your search during these unprecedented times.

 

Wednesday, Jan. 26

The Best Job Search and Networking Methods

This presentation will help you learn top job search strategies that will get you noticed. We’ll discuss how to conduct an industry-specific job search, which platforms to use, and why you need to move beyond online job boards to have a successful search.

 

Thursday, Jan. 27

Advanced Resumes and Cover Letters

You have probably heard that it’s essential to tailor your resume to match individual roles during your job search, but what does that look like? In this webinar, you’ll learn practical tips to craft a resume that can be easily tailored, and walk through the steps to tailor your resume to maximize your success rate.

 

Friday, Jan. 28

Job Search Interview Tips

Where you work can affect your happiness. Explore the 10 job search and interview tips to make your job search a strategic process. You will learn how to answer tough interview questions and ask the right questions during the interview to land your dream job!

 

Take advantage of UGA’s Alumni Career Services. Our goal is to provide alumni around the world with quality career coaching and management tools for each stage of their careers.

Mentorship smooths the path for a first-generation UGA student

The UGA Mentor Program is celebrating first-generation students during November. Here, in their own words, is the story of a first-generation student, Tatiana Anthony (BS ’20, MED ’23), and her mentor, alumna Shanelle Smith (BS ’16, MED ’18).

FORGING A CONNECTION

Shanelle: I have always valued mentorship. As a dual-enrollment student in high school, I received a mentor to help me navigate both the academic and personal challenges of being in the accelerated program. When I learned about the UGA Mentor Program, I knew it was my time to help others just as I had been helped.

Tatiana: When the UGA Mentor Program launched, I was extremely excited! I connected with my mentor, Shanelle, through the program during the first semester of my senior year in Fall 2020. As a first-generation college student that wanted to pursue mental health counseling, I have always valued representation and mentorship by other Black women in the field. The UGA Mentor Program was the perfect platform to find additional support during the graduate school admission process.

I was drawn to Shanelle’s profile because she was an alumna of the graduate program I wanted to pursue, and she has proven to be a great resource for me!

Shanelle: I had the pleasure of connecting with Tatiana at the beginning of her senior year. I was both shocked and honored to know that she had chosen me to be her mentor. Witnessing her journey to graduate school has been the most remarkable part of this mentorship.

A BUMP IN THE ROAD

Tatiana: When I was not accepted into the graduate program the first time I applied, I was devastated. During this time, Shanelle was very intentional about providing me with emotional support and encouraging me to apply again.

When I decided to move to St. Louis during my gap year to do service work as an AmeriCorps member, she was genuinely happy for me. We had dinner the day before I moved, and she got me housewarming gifts for my first apartment.

My entire gap year away from home, she called me regularly and helped me apply to graduate school again. The time difference between Georgia and Missouri did not stop us from connecting.

When it came time to interview for graduate programs, she and I interview-prepped in the evenings to make sure I was prepared. Once I was accepted into my graduate program and offered an assistantship, she was one of the first few people I called.

Shanelle: Many believe the idea of mentorship is to help the mentee grow both professionally and personally, but I can say Tatiana has pushed me to grow in many ways as well. Tatiana taught me that perseverance is always the answer, and to pursue my true wants in life. From getting to know each other, to processing all the nuances of a counseling grad program, this has been an exceptional journey.

The mental health field is forever growing, and it is an honor to work alongside such an inspiring Black woman—one who I know is going to do incredible things in this field. This is only the beginning for Tatiana.

WHY MENTOR?

Shanelle: Since 2020, it has been a pleasure getting to not only provide insight and knowledge to Tatiana, but also grow from the experience myself. I am grateful to the UGA Mentor Program for the connection to not only such a great mentee, but also with a lifelong friend.

I truly believe that in order to impact future generations, no matter what your academic field may be, becoming a part of the UGA Mentor Program is a meaningful way to not only give back to UGA, but also to grow personally as well. 

Tatiana: Shanelle has been through this journey with me every single step of the way. Even now, she continues to support me in my graduate program. I can confidently say that I would not be who and where I am today without her support. Thank you, Shanelle! And thank you, UGA Mentor Program.

Discover the joys of providing mentorship.

See other ways UGA is celebrating first-generation students, staff and faculty.

Travelin’ tips from UGA grads for World Tourism Day

The COVID-19 pandemic has assuredly thrown a wrench in–or entirely squashed–the travel plans of Bulldogs across the country. For those who work in the travel industry, it’s been an especially difficult year. So today, on World Tourism Day (Sept. 27), we checked in with a few travel-savvy alumni to see what tips they have for those looking to adventure beyond American borders. We also asked them where they hope to visit someday.

Europe Scene

Favorite Place to Visit Outside the U.S.

“I studied abroad in college–once in London and once in Verona. There’s a special place in my heart for both the UK and Italy, and I can’t wait to return!” –Jessica Drew (BSFCS ’09, MS ’12), travel advisor, SmartFlyer, Jessica Drew Travel

“Hippo Lakes African Safari Lodge outside of Johannesburg, South Africa. It’s a temperate climate year-round, beautiful, relaxing, and full of wildlife in their natural habitats.” –Stephanie Donlan (ABJ ’03), owner/travel planner, SJL Travel Co.

“Europe! I toured Germany, Austria, and Hungary with Adventures by Disney and Ama Waterways in 2018 and it was like sailing through a fairytale. It was a beautiful, educational and luxurious adventure.” –Christy Shadday (BSED ’93), co-owner and travel advisor, FTM Travel

“South Africa! I’ve been fortunate to visit twice and am so excited to visit again in the future.” –Lindsey Epperly (AB ’11), founder and ceo, Epperly Travel

“London is one of my favorite places. I was a history major at UGA and love how much history there is in London and that there are so many amazing things to experience!” –Elisabeth Alston (AB ’13), luxury travel advisor, Monarch Travel Team

“The Caribbean and its stunning sunrises and sunsets, fantastic weather, beautiful beaches, and great people. The list goes on!” –Eric Bowman (ABJ ’10), executive editor, TravelPulse.com

“Barcelona, Spain. The food and culture are amazing!” –Kim Hector (BBA ’06), owner and travel concierge, K. Hector Consulting LLC

Greece

Tips for Those Planning To Travel Abroad in 2021-2022

“Plan your trip at least six months in advance and remember to purchase travel insurance!” –Kim Hector (BBA ’06), owner and travel concierge, K. Hector Consulting LLC

“With recommendations and rules changing daily, it’s important to remain flexible and have the most up-to-date information.” –Jessica Drew (BSFCS ’09, MS ’12), travel advisor, SmartFlyer, Jessica Drew Travel

“Use a travel advisor. They can help plan, find amazing deals, and you’ll have someone in your corner should something happen on your trip.” –Eric Bowman (ABJ ’10), executive editor, TravelPulse.com

“Remaining flexible is key! When a travel expects the unexpected—whether a delayed flight or a change to COVID protocols—flexibility allows them to turn on a dime.” –Lindsey Epperly (AB ’11), founder and ceo, Epperly Travel

“Look into vendors with flexible date change policies.” –Stephanie Donlan (ABJ ’03), owner/travel planner, SJL Travel Co.

“Use a travel advisor! We are here to advise and guide clients so that costly and disappointing travel hiccups due to ever-changing travel protocols don’t happen.” –Christy Shadday (BSED ’93), co-owner and travel advisor, FTM Travel

“Check your passport expiration date! There is a backlog for renewals right now and we’ve had clients have to postpone or cancel trips because they didn’t get their passport back in time.” –Elisabeth Alston (AB ’13), luxury travel advisor, Monarch Travel Team

Africa

Where Would You Travel with an Unlimited Budget?

“I like to see new places, so right now, Italy is at the top of my bucket list. The food, the wine, the history … Venice, Rome, Florence, Lake Como, the Amalfi Coast, Tuscany … I’d love to spend an entire month exploring it all!” –Eric Bowman (ABJ ’10), executive editor, TravelPulse.com

“It would be a dream to hop on the Four Seasons private jet and hop around the globe at their hotels.” –Lindsey Epperly (AB ’11), founder and ceo, Epperly Travel

“I would love to visit Africa. There is such a stigma about this beautiful area and I would love to explore everything!” –Kim Hector (BBA ’06), owner and travel concierge, K. Hector Consulting LLC

“I would love to visit Greece for an extended vacation. The culture, landscape, and food seem like the perfect combination for an idyllic getaway.” –Jessica Drew (BSFCS ’09, MS ’12), travel advisor, SmartFlyer, Jessica Drew Travel

“Paris because it’s a magical city that has history, art, food, wine and Disney.” –Stephanie Donlan (ABJ ’03), owner/travel planner, SJL Travel Co.

“I would charter a luxury yacht and sail the Western Mediterranean with my family. I’m a fan of unpacking once and waking up in a new destination each day.” –Christy Shadday (BSED ’93), co-owner and travel advisor, FTM Travel

“Africa is at the top of my bucket list. I would love to start in Kenya or Tanzania and do a safari, and then end in the Seychelles for some island relaxation.” –Elisabeth Alston (AB ’13), luxury travel advisor, Monarch Travel Team

Thanks to these globe-trotting Bulldogs for their insights. Wherever you travel next, snap a photo in your UGA gear and tag @UGAAlumni and use #AlwaysADawg. If you’re looking to plan your next getaway, check out the incredible tours offered through the UGA Alumni Association’s official travel partners.

brian dill

Checking in with outgoing Alumni Board President Brian Dill

Brian Dill in front of Wray-Nicholson House

There’s a group of committed UGA alumni who dedicate their time, energy and financial resources to bringing Bulldogs together year-round, worldwide and lifelong. These spirited individuals represent the diverse and passionate UGA alumni family and strive to provide feedback, guidance and leadership as the University of Georgia seeks to ensure that its graduates Never Bark Alone. Throughout the year, we’ll get to know these individuals; they hail from various backgrounds and are involved in all corners of campus. Their ultimate goal: to empower the next breed of Bulldog to continue that tradition.

Name:

  • Brian Dill

I live in:

  • Carrollton, Georgia

Degrees:

  • 1994 – AB in Political Science (UGA)
  • 2019 – MBA (UGA)

I joined the board in:

  • 2007

What makes me most proud to be a Georgia Bulldog:

  • Being a part of a diverse and highly successful alumni family.
Brian Dill speaking at 40 Under 40

Brian speaking at UGA’s 40 Under 40 Awards Luncheon.

Ways I support UGA

If I had $1 million, I would support the ______ fund on campus.

My first job after graduation was

  • lobbying for the Atlanta Homebuilders Association

The UGA class I enjoyed most was

  • Southern Politics with Charles Bullock III
Brian Dill as Redcoat Band Member

Brian was a proud member of the Redcoat Band.

A moment that stood out as a UGA student was

  • My first game as a freshman in the Redcoat Band – the season opened with a night game in Baton Route against LSU.

My family includes:

  • Wife, Carmen (BSFCS ’95)
  • Son, Mason – attending Dean College in Massachusetts
  • Datson/Beagle, Jake
  • English Bulldog, Savannah
Carmen Brian and Mason Dill at the Arch

Brian (center) and his wife, Carmen, and son, Mason.

A special connection I have to UGA is:

  • My wife, Carmen, and I met on campus and later married in the UGA Chapel.
Carmen and Brian in Sky Suites

Carmen and Brian cheer for the Dawgs whenever they can!

As a student, I was involved in:

  • Redcoat Band
  • College Republicans
  • Job in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Crop and Soil Science department

My favorite place to study on campus was:

  • Main Library

My favorite place to dine on campus was:

  • Tate Center – quick and easy!

On a Friday night in college, you would have found me:

  • Studying? Oh yeah, downtown!
Brian Dill Delivering Commencement Address in 2019

Brian Dill delivering welcome remarks to the Class of 2019.

Graduation was:

  • On a very hot day, in the morning, and we sat in the stands at the time – not on the field.

When in college, I wish I had known that:

  • Just because they offer you credit card deals with free stuff doesn’t mean you should take them – not the best financial move back in the day!

A fellow grad who inspires me is:

  • Maria Taylor (ABJ ’09, MBA ’13), sportscaster for ESPN

A fellow student I knew who has since “made it big” is:

  • Brett Bawcum (BMUS ’97, MM ’00, DMA ’17), Redcoat Band director. It’s a pretty big deal to lead a band that you were a member of. Very proud of him!

Favorite UGA tradition:

  • Singing the Alma Mater in Sanford Stadium
Brian Dill and Hairy Dawg

While serving on the board, Brian has run into Hairy Dawg a few times!

When visiting Athens, I have to grab a bite at:

  • The Blind Pig Tavern

On gameday, you’ll find me:

  • Tailgating on North Campus

When this song comes on the radio, I think of UGA/college:

  • “Georgia On My Mind” by Ray Charles
Kevin Steele, Carmen and Brian Dill at 2015 Bulldog 100 Celebration

Carmen and Brian with Kevin Steele, a former UGA Student Alumni Council member, during the 2015 Bulldog 100 Celebration.

Most disliked athletic rival:

  • Georgia Tech

A few of my favorites:

  • Book: Decision Point by George W. Bush
  • Podcast: Andy Stanley
  • Band: Jimmy Buffett
  • TV/Streaming Show: Blue Bloods
  • Alumni-owned Business: Onward Reserve
  • Move: Smokey and the Bandit

Describe your dream weekend in Athens.

  • Friday night at Georgia Theatre with Kinchafoonee Cowboys, Saturday in Sanford Stadium watching the Dawgs beat the Nerds, and a Sunday brunch at Hilltop Grill listening to Jeff Dantzler (AB ’07) and Kevin Butler (AB ’18) break down another whupping from a Bulldog Saturday night!

No. 1 tip for a graduating Bulldog:

  • If you ever get an offer to work for a Georgia Tech grad … don’t!

No. 1 tip for a fellow Georgia grad who has lost touch with their alma mater:

  • We Never Bark Alone, so get re-engaged. You will never regret it. Go Dawgs!
Brian Dill speaking

Brian Dill speaking during a 2014 Alumni Board meeting in Athens.

Brian will remain on the Alumni Board of Directors as immediate past president, so we’ll still see him around – plus, as they say: Once a Dawg, Always a Dawg!

 

Who let the pets out: National Pet Day

We invited the Bulldog family to share pictures of their pets just in time for National Pet Day. Do you enjoy browsing pictures of adorable animals as much as we do? Paw through these pictures of furry (and feathered!) members of Bulldog Nation.

Wendy Hsiao's Dog

Wendy Hsiao: This little monster is named Georgia after her mom’s beloved football team. She was adopted 5 years ago – and it’s been the best years of my life!

Kathryn McHugh's Dog

Kathryn McHugh: Honey was rescued from the Athens-Area Humane Society in March 2019. She now lives with my husband and I, and her pup sister Annie, in Athens. Her favorite place to be is at the lake and she loves to snuggle. She is happy to be chewing on a bone, taking a nap, or sneaking an extra treat. Honey has a sweet personality and is so loved!

Mary Ann Hawthorne's Cats

Mary Ann Hawthorne: Smokey and Bandit are 8-month-old rescue kittens who are brothers. They are super adorable when they aren’t trying to kill each other.

Anna MacKenzie Clark's Dogs

Anna MacKenzie Clark: Kirby is my Dudley lab on the left, named after Kirby Smart. He loves chasing squirrels and sunbathing! Lutzenkirchen (Lutzie) is my dark Golden on the right, named after one of Auburn University’s tight ends. He loves snuggling his mama and his squeaky donut toy!

Grace Stewart's Dog

Grace Stewart: Star. Cheering on the 1980 Championship team.

Kristin Joyner's Dogs

Kristin Joyner: Bella and Rocky were surrendered. My neighbor adopted Rocky and we adopted Bella. Both are Boykin Spaniels and are inseparable. Go Dawgs!

Kim Wuenker Eilers's Parrot

Kim Wuenker Eilers: Ziggy is our 1-year-old pocket parrot. He’s an American Yellow Celestial Parrotlet. Ziggy loves to say “peekaboo” and “what are you doing?” We are trying to teach him to say “Go Dawgs!”

Denise Spangler's Dog

Denise Spangler (dean of UGA’s Mary Frances Early College of Education): Lucy is a 13-year-old Maltese who loves walks, treats, chasing squirrels, and sleeping on the couch while I watch Georgia football.

Stephanie Calhoun's Dog

Stephanie Calhoun: This is Oakley. She is the best ‘rufferee’ in Dawg Nation. Her speed and bark make her great on the field. She takes off every fall football Saturday, though, to watch the Dawgs between the hedges.

Diane Maddox's Cat

Diane Maddox: Bogo is a big hunk of snuggles!

Dr. Kristy McManus's Dog

Dr. Kristy McManus: Mr. Bigsby is a French Bulldog who was rescued from a horrible breeding situation in Tennessee in October 2015. This picture is of his first visit to the pet store to get his UGA jersey. Of course this made for a great Halloween picture, too! He had a rough first few years of life, but he is well-loved and living like a king now in Athens, Georgia. He is loving life as a member of the Bulldog Nation!

Ginny Henry's Dog

Ginny Henry: Gus is a sweetheart and in this pic was sporting a new ‘do. He was looking dandy with the tie that the groomer gave him. He loves long walks and playing catch and fetch.

Donna Nesmith's Dog

Donna Nesmith: We are a house divided. Meet Tebow Big Dawg Dooley and Georgia Natty Rose. Tebow and Georgia provide lots of entertainment around our house with their mischievous shenanigans. If you have never been around an English Bulldog, let me sum up their personality with a phrase, “I will only do it my way.” They take the word stubborn to a whole new level.

Mark Dzikowski's Dog

Mark Dzikowski: Daisy is a 16-year-old Georgia beagle by birth, but a Georgia Bulldog by the grace of God.

Patricia Dobbins Kirby's Dog

Patricia Dobbins Kirby: Dixie is a hard-playing farm dog! She loves going for rides, taunting her older siblings and running through as many mud puddles as she can find. But, she also loves quiet mornings snoozing between Mom and Dad. She is smart and beautiful!

Kelcie Willis's Dog

Kelcie Willis: Sasha is a beagle/Chow Chow (and more!) mix. She was adopted from DeKalb County Animal Services in 2019. On top of being extremely cute, she’s strong willed, food-motivated and eager to learn and play. She’s also quick to bow-wow-wow when she thinks something is amiss or wants a game of tug. She loves to get pets and likes other dogs, but she is very much a people lover. She’s never met a stranger!

Carolina Brown's Dog

Carolina Brown: Riley is a 2-year-old golden retriever who loves to play, sleep, and chase after golf balls in the yard! He is named after that Sanford Stadium favorite, “Baba O’Riley” since my husband and I met at a pre-game tailgate when I was a student.

Eight reasons why Uga is the best mascot

1. He’s a loyal family man

Uga has been owned by the same family since he arrived on the University of Georgia’s campus in 1956. Frank W. Seiler’s (BBA ’56, JD ’57) family of Savannah, Georgia, owns the English Bulldogs and is as much a part of their family as he is the UGA family.  

Uga in Sanford Stadium

2. He knows how to live in style

Sweating in the Georgia heat during a home game? What’s that? Uga’s on-field home is a permanent air-conditioned dog house located next to the cheerleaders’ platform. He gets to sit on a bag of ice to chill during the hot fall Saturdays in Athens. He also has his own room at UGA’s Center for Continuing Education & Hotel. 

Uga outside of his air-condition dog house

3. He’s graced the cover of Sports Illustrated Magazine

Uga is a model, plain and simple. Oh, and Sports Illustrated also named him the No. 1 mascot in all of college football. Nothing big.  

GIF of Uga

4. He has his own car

What’s that coming down the tracks? Uga in a Victory Red Suburban provided by Athens Chevrolet! Uga rides to Georgia games in style in an official vehicle that has a custom license plate detailing his name and roman numeral.  

Uga in the trunk of Victory Red Suburban car

5. He’s taken on a longhorn and survived the day

You might remember the 2019 All-State Sugar Bowl against the University of Texas Longhorns where their mascot, Bevo, charged Uga X and everyone went up in a frenzy. Good thing is that Uga came out unscathed. What other mascot has been targeted by an almost two-ton longhorn and survived?  

GIF of Kirby Smart

6. He’s a movie star

Petition to get Uga a movie franchise like Beethoven? Uga V made a cameo appearance in the 1997 film “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil” and had several scenes with John Cusack’s character walking through Forsyth Park. He had no bad sides, and the camera loved him. 

Uga with his tongue out

7. He knows how to work hard

The GIF speaks for itself. Good boy.  

8. He has the best squad

Name a better trio. We’ll wait.

Uga X with UGA mascot and Chip Chambers

Job Search Week (Jan. 25-29) will walk you through the full search process

With a new year comes the opportunity to realize your professional goals–and the UGA Career Center is here to help. From January 25-29, UGA’s Alumni Career Services office will host webinars with top career coaches, human resource professionals, and certified resume writers. Join in to hear from these job search strategy experts who will demonstrate how to masterfully execute your job search and stand out from other job seekers.

DAY 1

Mastering the Stages of Change: Mindsets for Career Changers 

Monday, January 25  |  1 p.m. EST

Ever wonder why change is so difficult? In this workshop we will share a six-stage model of change. Once you understand the change process, and what stage you are at in your job search, you’ll understand why you might feel stuck. Viewing your job search through the model, you’ll feel more empowered in your job search and how to combat resistance to change to make the career move you need.

DAY 2

Jumpstart Your Career in 2021

Tuesday, January 26  |  1 p.m. EST

Whether you are new to the workforce or are a seasoned professional, it can be easy to lose focus on opportunities to progress. We get busy, time flies, and the pandemic can make it feel impossible to pursue new career goals. Layer on working remotely, and you may lose sight of your dreams in the day-to-day balancing act. Or, maybe you find yourself in a temporary position that you want to take to the next level. This webinar will help you refocus on the big picture.

Day 3

Strategic Job Search and Networking Methods

Wednesday, January 27  |  1 p.m. EST

Do you know where to find the right roles? Are you tired of online job boards like Indeed.com? This presentation will help you learn the top job search strategies that will get you noticed. We will discuss how to conduct an industry-specific job search, which platforms to use, and why you need to move beyond online job boards to have a successful search.

DAY 4

Advanced Resumes and Cover Letters 

Thursday, January 28  |  1 p.m. EST

You have probably heard that it’s important to tailor your resume to match individual roles during your job search, but what does that look like? In this webinar, we will discuss practical tips for creating a resume that can be easily tailored. We’ll also walk through steps to tailor your resume to maximize your job search success rate.

DAY 5

Top 10 Job Search and Interview Tips

Friday, January 29  |  1 p.m. EST

Where you work can affect your happiness. Rose Opengart, career coach and former HR staffing manager, will share how to job search and interview to land the best job for you! Some takeaways from this webinar include:

  • The job search should be a strategic process; not a “spray and pray.”
  • The job interview is a two-way street!

You will learn how to answer tough interview questions and which interview questions to ask so you can find your dream job!

 

You do not want to miss these opportunities to build the career of your dreams. Register today! NOTE: You must register for each webinar individually. If you have any questions, contact Kali DeWald, Associate Director of Alumni Career Services. For information about other Alumni Career Services, visit the UGA Career Center.

International mentoring does a world of good

In honor of International Mentoring Day, a highlight of National Mentoring Month, the UGA Mentor Program is featuring a couple of our international mentors and mentees.

Finding common ground a world away

Matt Hodgson outside his work

After double majoring in criminal justice and psychology at UGA, Matt Hodgson (AB ’95) went on to earn a master’s degree in forensic science from George Washington University. He now lives in Brisbane, Australia, and works for the Queensland Police Service. He has always wanted to give back to UGA in some way, and the opportunity to mentor students was a perfect opportunity.

Hodgson says he was lucky to have a couple of great mentors in college, even though UGA didn’t have a campus-wide mentorship program at the time.

“You just had to find people who would take you under their wing,” he recalled. “I was lucky to strike up some friendships with faculty members. They gave me good advice—and not just about academics—also about career paths and just life itself. I’m hoping I can do the same for someone else.”

Hodgson has mentored two UGA students. One of those students, Gabrielle Fontaine (’22), explained that she chose to contact Hodgson through the UGA Mentor Program website because of her interest in forensic psychology and the fact that he was based internationally.

“The time difference and different seasons made for great conversation and broadened my knowledge of what life is like in Australia,” Gabrielle said. “Having him as a mentor allowed me to think about expanding my search to consider a career overseas.”

For Hodgson, mentoring is a way to stay involved with the Bulldog family.

“Mentoring brings together the perfect mix for me,” Hodgson said. “I am able, with experience and hindsight, to chat and help out students with career, study or other advice—plus I get to hear and share insights about UGA life and events.”

Gaining confidence one step at a time

Portrait of Kenny Lawal

As a UGA graduate student from Nigeria, Kehinde (Kenny) Lawal (’22) struggled to acclimate to the UGA system, which differed from her home country. She also felt inferior to others on campus. Joining the UGA Mentor Program inspired her.

“It has been rewarding for me to watch her confidence grow to match her abilities and qualifications,” said Lawal’s mentor, Alex Gomez (BSBCHE ’13). He goes on to sing her praises. “She is goal-oriented, proactive and extremely qualified to excel in whatever she does.”

In addition to looking to build her confidence, Lawal joined the UGA Mentor Program because she wanted to get a clear understanding of a career in the energy industry in the United States. “I was hoping I could get direction from someone with experience in that field,” she explained. “Alex has been so great in showing me where I was and where I needed to be by setting short- and long-term goals. He has also shown me opportunities available to me at UGA that I needed to take advantage of to build a brand for myself. My focus has shifted from just getting a degree to also leveraging relationships that matter. I am looking forward to being an impactful and friendly mentor, just as Alex Gomez has been to me.”

Creating a network for success

Portrait of Zada Smith

For Zada Smith (’21), who hails from the Bahamas, enrolling at UGA wasn’t her first experience living in Georgia, but she was still surprised by how much had changed since she was a child. She described the culture shock as immense.

“The hardest part about being at UGA was feeling socially disconnected,” said Smith. “It seemed as though everyone knew people from their high schools and had a success network surrounding them. Trying to find the courage to reach out to professors and make friends was tough.”

Smith found a safe haven in the UGA Mentor Program.

“I didn’t have the courage to reach out to someone and ask for mentoring,” she said, “but the UGA Mentor Program had a platform of mentors ready to help. It was a great way to learn about my field from someone established.”

Smith’s mentor Matthew Dials (BLA ’07) said, “Having an international mentee provided a unique perspective on the challenges some students face and how important the UGA network is for providing a support system to help them succeed.”

Connecting Bulldogs with Bulldogs

The UGA Mentor Program platform is well-suited to facilitating international connections. As communication takes place via text, email, phone or video conferencing, bridging distance is no problem.

“I suppose the biggest challenge has been trying to coordinate time zones and finding the right time to call for a chat,” Hodgson explained. “Australia is a day ahead of Georgia, so I’ll be calling in the morning and speaking to a mentee who is a day behind me in the afternoon.”

There are more than 2,600 mentors in the UGA Mentor Program. While the majority are located in the United States, there are mentors in 18 other countries. All program participants agree that preparation and planning are key to a successful mentoring relationship, whether international or not. The Mentor Program provides resources to help guide discussions, set goals, and get the best results from every interaction.