Alumni elected to UGA Foundation Board of Trustees

John H. Crawford IV (BBA '88) the newly elected chairman of the UGA Foundation.

John H. Crawford IV (BBA ’88) the newly elected chairman of the UGA Foundation.

The University of Georgia Foundation approved changes in leadership and board positions during its annual meeting June 13-14 at Lake Oconee.

The board voted unanimously to elect John H. Crawford IV (BBA ’88) as chairman effective July 1 for a term running through June 30, 2021. He succeeds William W. Douglas III (BBA ’83), whose term concludes June 30.

“I am grateful for my time on the board, and I am proud of all the University of Georgia – in partnership with the UGA Foundation – has achieved. I look forward to seeing what the UGA Foundation does under John Crawford’s leadership,” said Douglas.

The board also elected, by unanimous vote, trustees Neal J. Quirk (BBA ’82, JD ’87) as executive vice chairman, Bonney Stamper Shuman (BBA ’80) as treasurer and Stephen M. “Steve” Joiner (BBA ’86) as secretary.

The University of Georgia Foundation elected ten new trustees and accorded seven trustees emeritus status during the winter meeting.

The board voted unanimously to elect Leah C. Brown (BS ’98), Betsy Cox (JD ’80), Elisha W. Finney (BBA ’83), Elizabeth Correll Richards, Bonney Stamper Shuman and Delos H. “Dee” Yancey III to the board. The new members will join current trustees to make a 34-member board.

Four advisory trustees, James L. “Jim” Dinkins (BBA ’84), J. Keith Kelly (BSA ’80), Jodi Holtzman Selvey (BSA ’84) and E. Howard Young (BBA ’82) were also elected to assist foundation committees in defining and achieving their strategic goals.

“It’s with our deepest gratitude that we thank our outgoing trustees, all of whom have given generously of their time and energy,” said Crawford. “I am excited as we begin this new chapter in the UGA Foundation’s history, and I believe we have a tremendous opportunity ahead of us to not only serve our students, but our state and the world.”

Officers:

John H. Crawford IV, of Atlanta, chairman, is the managing director of equity investments of Crawford Investment Counsel, Inc.  He earned a bachelor’s degree in finance from UGA in 1988.  He has served as the chair of the investment committee and as executive vice-chairman for the last two years.

Neal J. Quirk, of Atlanta, executive vice-chairman, is an attorney with Quirk & Quirk, LLC.  He attended UGA and earned a bachelor’s degree in finance in 1982 and law degree in 1987.  He has served as the chairs of the strategic planning, development and nominating, and trusteeship committees.

Bonney Stamper Shuman, of St. Simons, treasurer, was the co-founder of Stratix Corporation in 1983 and served as president of the board and chief executive officer. She earned her bachelor’s degree in finance from UGA in 1980. Shuman previously served as an UGA Foundation ex-officio, voting trustee and as the UGA Alumni Association President.

Stephen M. “Steve” Joiner, of Atlanta, Georgia, secretary, is retired as partner from Deloitte and Touche LLP, one of the nation’s leading professional services firms.  He earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from UGA in 1986.  He has served as chairs of the finance and audit committees as well as treasurer.

Elected Trustees:

Betsy C. Cox, of Jacksonville, Florida, is a shareholder with Rogers Towers, P.A. concentrating in the areas of complex commercial, bankruptcy and estate litigation. She earned her law degree from UGA in 1980.

Elisha W. Finney, of San Francisco, retired as the chief financial officer of Varian Medical Systems Inc. in 2017. She earned her bachelor’s degree in risk management and insurance from UGA in 1983.

Delos H. “Dee” Yancey III, of Rome, serves as the chairman, chief executive officer and president of State Mutual Insurance Company.

Elected Trustees, unexpired terms:

Leah C. Brown, of Phoenix, is a board-certified orthopaedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine and treatment of the knee, shoulder and elbow. She was a 14-time NCAA All-American and a two-time NCAA National Gymnastics Champion and was inducted into UGA’s Circle of Honor in 2016 for these accomplishments. She earned her bachelor’s degree in genetics from UGA in 1998.

Elizabeth Correll Richards, of Atlanta, is chairman and chief executive officer of Quality Staffing of America, Inc. She earned her bachelor’s degree in early childhood education and child psychology from The Ohio State University in 1992. She serves as the co-chair of the UGA Parent’s Leadership Council.

Advisory Trustees:

James L. “Jim” Dinkins, of Atlanta, is the president of Coca-Cola North America. Prior to his appointment he was President of the Minute Maid Business Unit. He earned his bachelor’s degree in management from UGA in 1984.

J. Keith Kelly, of Newborn, is the president and chief executive officer of Kelly products, which is one of the premier agribusiness companies in the U.S. He earned his bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics from UGA in 1980.

Jodi Holtzman Selvey, of Atlanta, is the senior vice president for Colliers International and specializes in Office Tenant Representation. Jodi recently served as the Chair of the Parents Leadership Council at UGA. She earned her bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics from UGA in 1984.

E. Howard Young, of Atlanta, is the president of General Wholesale Beer Company, a multi-generational family business. He is a member of the Terry Dean’s Advisory Council and chairs the Destroy Pancreatic Cancer nonprofit organization. He earned his bachelor’s degree in marketing from UGA in 1982.

Ex-Officio, voting trustees:

Brian C. Dill, alumni association president succeeding Bonney Stamper Shuman.

David E. Shipley, chair of the university council, executive committee succeeding Andrew P. “Andy” Owsiak.

Ex-Officio, non-voting trustees:

Rachel Byers, is the UGA Student Government Association president succeeding Ammishaddai Grand-Jean.

S. Jack Hu, senior vice president for academic affairs and provost for the University of Georgia. He begins on July 1 after previously serving as the vice president for research at the University of Michigan.

The UGA Foundation Board of Trustees also accorded emeritus status during their June meeting to seven trustees whose terms conclude on June 30: Daniel P. “Dan” Amos, Alston D. “Pete” Correll, Kenneth G. “Ken” Jackson, Emily D. “Sissy” Lawson, C. Read Morton, Jr., Stanley W. “Stan” Shelton, Susan C. Waltman.

Congratulations, 2019 40 Under 40!

40 Under 40 Logo

We’re proud to announce the 40 Under 40 Class of 2019 today! This program, in its ninth year, celebrates the achievements of successful UGA graduates under the age of 40–a set of alumni who are leading the pack in their industries and communities. These young leaders will be recognized during the ninth annual 40 Under 40 Awards Luncheon Sept. 13 in the Tate Student Center on campus. If you’re interested, please join us for this special event.

Each Honoree Stands Out

The 2019 class includes a few names you might recognize:

  • Allison R. Schmitt, a gold medal-winning Olympic swimmer
  • Malcolm Mitchell, Super Bowl champion and children’s author
  • Will Carr, a correspondent for ABC News on a national level

But even if you don’t know the names of everyone on the list, you’ll still be impressed at the caliber of these graduates working in everything from law and politics, to health care, nonprofit and food and beverage. For example, Tim Fleming is Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp’s chief of staff and Catherine Marti is a cardiologist at Piedmont Heart Institute focused on heart failure and transplant cardiology.

“We are excited to unveil this year’s class of 40 Under 40 and welcome them back home to Athens for the awards luncheon in September,” said Meredith Gurley Johnson, executive director of alumni relations. “I am always amazed by the excellence of our young alumni. These outstanding individuals exemplify leadership in their industries and communities.”

The Competition

Talk about a competitive selection process: nominations for 40 Under 40 were open from February to April, and more than 400 alumni were nominated for this year’s class. Honorees, of course, must have attended UGA and they have to uphold the Pillars of the Arch: wisdom, justice and moderation. Additional criteria are available on the 40 Under 40 webpage.

“The achievements of our nominated alumni each year make it hard to narrow down the list to just 40 honorees, and this year was no exception,” said Johnson. “We are proud of all of these outstanding young graduates. Their drive and focus inspires the UGA community.”

Ok, Ok, Show Me the List!

This year’s 40 Under 40 honorees, including their city, title and employer, are listed below in alphabetical order:

The Event

As we said earlier, if you’re interested in attending the 2019 40 Under 40 Awards Luncheon in Athens on Friday, September 13, please register today! *If you’re an honoree, please use the registration link provided to you by the Alumni Relations team.

Why give to UGA?

At the University of Georgia, giving is a treasured tradition. Since 2014, donors have given over $18 million each year through regular annual giving.

Greater financial support from alumni affects national recognition and college rankings. By giving to your alma mater, you’re investing in the value of your degree.

Be part of the legacy. Each year, more than 50,000 alumni and friends give to increase access for students, enhance the learning environment and fund world-changing research and service. No matter the amount, every gift matters.

Give by June 30 to ensure you are a 2019 donor. Donors will receive a 2019 UGA Donor window decal and a subscription to Georgia Magazine.

UGA in Washington reception reunites alumni, friends

UGA alumni at DC event

Hundreds of alumni were in attendance at the UGA in Washington reception on June 19.

The University of Georgia brought a little bit of Athens to D.C. during its annual UGA in Washington reception on June 19 at Union Station.

The event was an occasion for UGA alumni and friends in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area to connect with one another as well as with UGA President Jere W. Morehead, UGA Vice President for Government Relations Toby Carr, and special guest UGA head football coach Kirby Smart.

More than 140 UGA alumni work on Capitol Hill. Among those in attendance at the reception were Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue (DVM ’71) and Congressmen Buddy Carter (BSPH ’80), Rick Allen and Jody Hice.

In attendance at the UGA in Washington event were, from left, UGA Vice President for Government Relations Toby Carr, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, U.S. Rep. Buddy Carter and UGA President Jere W. Morehead.

“UGA in Washington is always a wonderful opportunity to meet with our remarkable D.C. alumni,” said Meredith Gurley Johnson, executive director of alumni relations. “We are proud to have such a significant presence in the capital with over 5,000 alumni living in the area and our Washington Semester Program students living and learning in Delta Hall.”

Since Delta Hall’s opening in 2015, more than 250 UGA students have taken classes, participated in internships and immersed themselves in D.C.’s vibrant culture. More than 150 of those students have remained in the area after graduation and have stayed involved with the university through the D.C. Dawgs alumni chapter.

The D.C. alumni chapter is one of the most active in the country and hosts dozens of professional development and cultural events every year, in addition to game watching parties during football season. All UGA supporters are invited to participate in events and programs hosted by local alumni chapters.

Five punny reasons you don’t want to miss UGA Young Alumni Night at SweetWater

We know you don’t really need an excuse to go to SweetWaterit kind of sells itself. But indulge us anyway. Here are five reasons missing this annual event would be un-beer-able:    

  1. Don’t worry, beer hoppy. What better way to spend a summer Friday than surrounded by fellow Bulldogs? Reminisce about sunny afternoons on north campus, be grateful you’re not spending your evening cramming in the MLC and count down the days until football season returns ( … it’ll be 64 from Young Alumni Night).

    UGA Young Alumni Night at SweetWater
  2. New taproom? Ale yeah! Did you know that SweetWater recently renovated and reopened its much-anticipated taproom? The new space allows for 24 different beers to be available on tap. Yeah, you read that right. 
  3. Hip hops. A local Atlanta band will be performing some of your favorite songs all night long. Pretend you’re back in Athens at the 40 Watt, Georgia Theatre or Hendershots.

    UGA Young Alumni Night at SweetWater
  4. Pitcher perfect. Take a selfie, pose with friends and make the perfect boomerang glass clink. Your Instagram feed will thank you.

    UGA Young Alumni Night at SweetWater
  5. You’re supporting students – thank brew very much! A portion of your ticket price will help fund UGA student scholarships.  

Bonus reason: FOOD.  

Let’s be honest – you don’t have anything planned for next Friday anyway. Grab a friend (or five), request an Uber/Lyft/Bird/Lime and we’ll see you there. Cheers! 

 June 28
9 p.m. to midnight 

AthFest through the years

With year 23 of AthFest taking place this weekend, we asked for your favorite memories from years past. Check out the post below to reminisce on some #TBT pics! We’ve included important details for the weekend at the end of this post.

AthFest 2009:

“My high school’s ET club ran second stage every year – I fell in love with Athens my first trip.” – Virginia Luke (AB ’17)

Photo from Virginia Luke

 

AthFest 2012:

“Seeing Emily Hearn perform! Crazy to see a fellow Bulldog and friend on the Pulaski Stage. Her songs are just so fresh and fun to sing and dance to!” – Laura Bayne (AB ’11, MPA ’19)

Photo from Red and Black

 

AthFest 2016:

“Seeing Family and Friends and Kishi Bashi up close was a dream come true” – Ally Hellenga (ABJ ’16)

Photo from Kishi Bashi’s Facebook page

 

AthFest 2018:

“The music is awesome, but my favorite part was the open-air Artist Market. They have booths up and down Washington Street with a ton of cool vendors, and you could buy unique, local items.” – Caitlyn Richtman (ABJ ’19, AB ’19)

Photo from AthFest Educates

Additional Information:

Cost:

All of the outdoor stages are free! If you want to purchase a Club Crawl wristband, it’s $25. Be sure to check each club’s age restrictions.

Schedule:

This weekend’s schedule is jam-packed.

Parking and Stage Map:

This post was written by Communications Intern Bailey Carreker

Top 10 picnic spots at UGA

June 18 is apparently International Picnic Day. If you’re like those of us at the UGA Alumni Association, you love a good reason to 1) get outside, 2) eat delicious food, and 3) spend time with fellow Bulldogs.

So today, we are proud to bring you our top 10 list of places to picnic on the University of Georgia campus.

1. Herty Field

Herty Field is home to Herty Fountain and is near the UGA Chapel Bell, so you’re likely to enjoy the sound of celebration as you picnic here. Lay out a blanket on the lawn in front of Moore College or snag a nearby solar-powered picnic table. And don’t forget a Frisbee or football!

2. With Bernard Ramsey

Enjoy your picnic on the bench alongside a statue of Bernard Ramsey, one of UGA’s most generous benefactors. Located on North Campus, just outside of Moore College, good ol’ Bernard is always willing to picnic with students, faculty, staff and visitors. Bonus: you can complete a tradition in the G Book, UGA’s official traditions guide, while you eat!

3. Lake Herrick

Lake Herrick is situated within Oconee Forest Park and adjacent to UGA’s Rec Sports Complex. It provides opportunities for recreation, research and experiential learning. Bring your picnic and afterward, consider taking a walk, trail running, fishing or birdwatching. You can even bring your own canoe, kayak or paddleboard to enjoy the lake. This is a true oasis within the Classic City.

4. State Botanical Garden of Georgia

The State Botanical Garden of Georgia is free to visit and there’s plenty of complimentary parking. UGA Public Service and Outreach oversees the garden, which seeks to inspire an appreciation of nature in visitors of all ages. Find your ideal picnic spot in the Flower Garden, Heritage Garden, greenhouses, Alice H. Richards Children’s Garden, Hummingbird Trail, International Garden, Shade and Native Flora Gardens, and Trails and Nature Areas. Prefer to be indoors, check out the Tropical Conservatory.

5. Memorial Garden or Head Terrace

The Memorial Garden is located in the geographic heart of UGA, just outside of the Miller Learning Center, along Sanford Drive. It is an oasis of trees and stone in remembrance of those from UGA who have given their lives in service to our country. Bring a picnic or pick up a bite from the Bulldog Café in the Tate Student Center, and enjoy it while watching students pass by en route to class. Just around the corner is the Jacqueline and John Head Terrace, an outdoor amphitheater-style space on the north side of the Miller Learning Center.

6. North Campus

North Campus, a U.S. National Register of Historic Places, graces the front of many UGA brochures and directly faces downtown Athens. This grassy expanse is our version of the stereotypical “college quad” and is surrounded by numerous historical buildings, including the UGA Chapel, Old College and the Main Library. Snag a spot under a large oak tree and watch as students, faculty, staff, and visitors pass by (or through) the iconic Arch as they enter and exit campus.

7. Latin American Ethnobotanical Garden

Snag a picnic table in this garden just south of Baldwin Hall. Opened in 1998, the garden is managed by UGA’s Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute and emphasizes the field of ethnobotany, the study of the relationship between people and plants. Word is that there is sometimes even live music taking place in the garden.

8. Founders Memorial Garden

Nestled between Lumpkin Street and North Campus, this garden was the brainchild of Hubert Owens, the founder and first dean of UGA’s landscape architecture program. It features a variety of plants and design styles for teaching, an arboretum in remembrance of those who died in WWII, Lumpkin House, the Boxwood Garden sundial, a time capsule that will be opened in 2091, and an arbor that shades a bench. Featured on p. 36 of the Summer 2018 issue of Georgia Magazine.

9. W. Brooks Mall

The D.W. Brooks Mall is located on South Campus, near the new Science Learning Center. The open green space is perfect for a picnic—followed by a cone from the UGA Creamery (another tradition in the UGA G Book).

10. Between the Hedges

Okay, trick answer. It’s not actually possible to picnic on the (soon to be Dooley) field in Sanford Stadium … but you have to admit, it would be pretty cool.

First Father’s Day: sharing UGA and Athens with my son

Dear Son,

As Father’s Day approaches, and the reality sets in that I will get to celebrate this year with you, my son, I can’t help but think about how much I’m looking forward to introducing you to everything I love about UGA and Athens. Like…

Walking past the Arch and playing frisbee in the shady grass of North Campus.


Taking you to Sanford Stadium and putting you on my shoulders to see over the crowd to watch the Dawgs run out of the tunnel for the first time.


Tailgating with our family and friends all season long.

Smelling the nutty aroma of coffee and splitting Fruity Pebbles donuts at Ike and Jane.


Playing Connect Four and eating (too many) hot dogs at HiLo.


Ordering the Hermit Crab sandwich at Seabear. Because it’s on the secret menu and that makes me seem like a cool Dad.


Taking you downtown during Twilight to watch the bikes speed by.


Walking fairways at the UGA Golf Course, and teaching you how to stick an iron close.


Taking you to the Farmers Market on Saturday mornings to stand in the Farm Cart line to wait for the best biscuits in town.


Climbing the hill on Baxter to show you Russell Hall – where Dad lived his freshman year. Then over to Gran Ellen where I lived as a junior and senior, just down the street from our favorite spot, Memorial Park and Bear Hollow Zoo.

 

Thanks for making me a father, buddy. You’re a Damn Good Dawg (and son).

 

 

Love, Dad

Alex Bezila (BBA ’10)

Talking Nature Photography Day with Eric Bowles (BBA ’79)

UGA alumni can be found doing amazing things all over the world, so we were delighted to find Eric Bowles (BBA ’79) on the board of directors for the North American Nature Photography Association (NANPA), which established Nature Photography Day (June 15)A professional photographer specializing in the Southeast United States, Eric’s work has been published in magazines, newspapers, and commercial publications.  

Why did NANPA create Nature Photography Day?  

Nature Photography Day was created by NANPA to enhance awareness of the power of nature photography in telling important stories. June 15 would be a time to invite family and friends outside and to learn about the natural sights and places in their neighborhoods. Why not look to local scenes, where you can see and appreciate nature even in your own backyard? 

What are some of your favorite places to photograph nature? 

The diversity of nature in the United States is quite amazing. We’re very lucky to have so many places to go to see and photograph nature. One of the best known parks is Yellowstone National Park. The geysers are the icons of the area – and Old Faithful is the most famous.  

Yellowstone National Park

Photo by Eric Bowles (BBA ’79) | www.bowlesimages.com

Closer to home, the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge is one of my favorite places to visit. Wildlife thrives in the Okefenokee – alligators, snakes, and a tremendous variety of birds. But what people don’t think about are all the beautiful wildflowers that are found in the Okefenokee. 

Alligator in the Okefenokee Swamp

Photo by Eric Bowles (BBA ’79) | www.bowlesimages.com

How has being a UGA graduate influenced your career? 

My undergraduate degree is in finance, and I spent more than 20 years in banking with what is now Bank of America. The foundation I received in business and finance has helped me with roles on boards and leadership roles throughout my career.  

UGA also has a tremendous research program, and photographs are part of many research initiatives. I’ve photographed several research projects through UGA.  One project involved counting and photographing birds at the edge of the Gulf stream to document migration. Sometime you get the unexpected – such as a sea turtle that decided a scientific instrument was a toy – resulting in the measuring equipment being many miles off course. 

What’s the story behind one of your photos? 

One of my favorite photos was made in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. This particular photo idea started with just a small plant on a mossy rock. I returned to the area at least a half dozen times over the next four weeks working on compositions and watching the plant begin to bloom. We had just enough rain for the stream to rise and create just the shot I wanted, but it continued to rain every day over the next week and the water continued to rise.  By the end of the week, a torrent of water was flowing rapidly through the quiet stream and the blossoms were gone.  

Waterfall in the Smokies

Photo by Eric Bowles (BBA ’79) | www.bowlesimages.com

What’s your best tip for a Bulldog looking to get into nature photography?

Photography in general requires some degree of specialization. If you choose what you love and are truly passionate about your photography, you can build a successful career. It’s not just about making good photographs–that’s a given. It’s about spending the time and effort to find projects and work that you truly enjoyYou may not be ready to specialize right away, so it’s fine to explore different areas. Take a look at all the places you see still photography and short videos to get an idea of the opportunities available.  

 

College of Pharmacy dean, alumna is committed to success of others

The UGA Alumni Association is proud to spotlight Kelly Smith (BSPH ’92, PHARMD ’93), dean of the UGA College of Pharmacy, who returned to her alma mater in late 2018.