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Across the decades: UGA’s 60th anniversary of desegregation

On January 9, 1961, Hamilton Holmes (BS ’63) and Charlayne Hunter-Gault (ABJ ’63) enrolled as the first Black students at the University of Georgia. 2021 marks the 60th anniversary of UGA’s desegregation.

The legacies of Holmes, Hunter-Gault and Mary Frances Early (MMED ’62, EDS ’67), UGA’s first Black graduate, sparked 60 years of growth at UGA. Because of these students, UGA now boasts a diverse campus made of numerous nationalities, races and ethnicities. The university is commemorating the anniversary and Black History Month by hosting a series of events this spring. And this week, we’re sharing Pandora photos of Black students on campus since the 1960s. Check them out …

The 1960s

From the classroom and lab to campus organizations, these snapshots recognize Black students who joined the Bulldog family in the 1960s.

The 1970s

Continue to stroll with us down ‘Memory Lane’ to the 1970s and check out these students’ campus moments.

The 1980s

Ah, the 1980s! What a time for fashion, pop culture and continuing to build on a legacy that was established just 20 years earlier when UGA was desegregated in 1961. Black students were continuing to make history on campus as orientation leaders, drum majors and in Greek life. Recognize any of these Bulldogs?

The 1990s

These ’90s throwback photos are definitely giving off Tony! Toni! Tone’! “It Feels Good” vibes. Some of your favorite Bulldogs’, favorite Bulldogs were UGA-made in the 1990s.

The 2000s

Let’s swing back through the early 2000s to see a few Black students sharing the first few “side eyes” and “hard” looks caught on camera … and some fun, too!

 

National Entrepreneurship Week: Q&A with Jasmyn Reddicks (BSA ’18)

Jasmyn Reddicks (BSA ’18) is the owner and founder of VTasteCakes, an Atlanta-based vegan bakery. While studying food industry marketing and administration at the University of Georgia, Jasmyn won the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ 2018 Food and AgriBusiness Entrepreneurial Initiative (FABricate). After graduating, Jasmyn launched her business and has been baking made-to-order cakes, cookies, cupcakes and muffins ever since.

In commemoration of National Entrepreneurship Week (Feb. 13-20), Jasmyn shares how her passion for baking with her family led her to launch a business that has a dessert for every Bulldog.

Before entering the FABricate Entrepreneurship Initiative, did you plan to launch a business after graduation?

Not exactly. I always knew I wanted to start a bakery one day, but I never thought it would be so early in life. I didn’t realize that I was limiting my own abilities by thinking too small until the opportunity to start a bakery presented itself. After my mentor, family and friends convinced me that I had a good enough idea to participate in the FABricate project, I decided to go for it. It ended up being one of the best decisions of my life.

What led you to combine your passion for baking with a vegan diet?

I was inspired by my friends who have food allergies. I grew up baking, but the older I got, the more I realized that many people have allergies to baked goods. After learning about the limited options that existed and consuming a few, I realized there was a big opportunity for improvement. I wanted to create a dessert that is delicious, beautiful and that anyone can eat!

 

Jasmyn Reddicks in front of a VTasteCakes banner

How did FABricate and other UGA programs prepare you to start and operate VTasteCakes?

The FABricate competition sparked my motivation that anything is possible no matter who you are. I transferred to UGA, and FABricate helped me find purpose at a large school. It also gave me many resources that I still use today. The UGA Small Business Development Center has helped me with funding and growing a small business. I also received funding from UGA’s Next Top Entrepreneur competition in 2019.

You often cite the influence of your grandma on your passion for baking. Do you consider your business a way of honoring her?

In many ways, I do. I am thankful for my upbringing. Baking was always a way to bond with my family and build community, which are two things I value. This has helped cultivate my view on life and inspired me to bring people together, one dessert at a time.

Have you encountered any challenges as a Black woman owning a business?

I think the biggest challenge is being respected and taken seriously. I don’t get automatic validation without having to prove it. But I have learned to overcome these challenges with grace. When people go low, I do the opposite and go high!

 

Jasmyn Reddicks holds a cake

 

Since graduating, leaving Athens and launching your business, what have you learned?

The biggest lesson I have learned is to enjoy every moment, even the tough ones. As an entrepreneur, there are highs and lows, but it is a beautiful thing to look back on how far you have come and how much you have grown as an individual. It still amazes me all the support I received over the years.

Do you have a preference for baking cakes or cupcakes?

Surprisingly, I am learning that I love to do cakes more. I feel like I am able to express my creative edge in my designs.

Can you share advice for Bulldogs who want to start their own businesses?

My advice would be to go for it and to choose passion over money. This is the perfect time to research an idea, test it out and not be afraid to ask for help. If you put in the hard work, avoid shortcuts and be consistent, it will pay off.

Your support today will help prepare tomorrow’s entrepreneurs and innovators.


DONATE TO THE FABRICATE ENTREPRENEURSHIP FUND

LEARN MORE ABOUT UGA’S INNOVATION DISTRICT


SUPPORT THE SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER

National Weatherperson’s Day: Q&A with Alex Wallace (ABJ ’04)

Alex Wallace (ABJ ’04) is an on-camera meteorologist with The Weather Channel. After earning a degree in broadcast news from the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication, Alex earned a master’s degree in geosciences with an emphasis in broadcast meteorology from Mississippi State University. Since joining The Weather Channel on-camera in 2006, Alex has worked in both the studio and the field. He earned the 2012 John Drewry Award for Young Alumni Achievement from the Grady College.

In recognition of National Weatherperson’s Day (February 5), this weather-loving Bulldog shares what it’s like being an on-camera meteorologist and reflects on his time at the University of Georgia.

After studying broadcast news at UGA, what led you to pursue a career in meteorology?

I had a fascination with weather going back to when I was a little kid. Along with cartoons, I made sure to catch the local news and tune into the Weather Channel every day. So, I always knew I wanted to do something in broadcasting but wasn’t exactly sure what. Would it be behind the scenes or in front of the camera? At UGA, I combined my interest in broadcasting and weather to pursue a career in meteorology.

What lessons did the Grady College teach you that you still use today?

At Grady, I learned the different parts that come together to make a news broadcast. Before I did anything in front of the camera, I gained experience with everything from operating a teleprompter to directing. This was a great help for when I finally stepped in front of the camera. It allowed me to understand each person’s contribution to the show and how important they were. That understanding continues to this day. I appreciate all the people that come together to produce TV.

 

headshot of Alex

What is the most interesting weather event you have reported on?

Hurricane Florence in 2018. I was positioned in Fayetteville, North Carolina. It came in and decided it didn’t want to leave. It dumped a ton of rain on the region. I was out covering the storm for more than a week. It ended up knocking out power for several days so it was “fun” being in the dark and taking cold showers for a few days. The moment power came back was one of the greatest moments of my life. It was fascinating to see one of the rivers that flows through the city slowly rise while we were there. I’m talking about a 40-foot rise in a few days. Of course, that led to flooding, which made getting around impossible because so many roads were closed. More importantly, people’s homes were inundated and this was the sad part about the whole experience: knowing we are at the mercy of Mother Nature.

What is a part of your job that many people may not know about?

I think people might be surprised to know that 90% of everything I say on-air is ad-libbed. Sure, there are a few things that are scripted like introducing an interview or weather story, but otherwise it is mostly ad-libbed.

 

Alex Wallace and friend pose with Harry Dawg on a game day

Alex Wallace (ABJ ’04) and Thomas Goodhew (ABJ ’05) pose with Harry Dawg on a Saturday game day in Athens.

What is your favorite UGA tradition and why?

G-Day! Being out of school, Georgia football is a great excuse to get back to Athens and enjoy some time in the Classic City. I’m looking forward to when I can bring my son out to enjoy some time in Sanford Stadium.

Do you have any advice for students seeking a career in meteorology?

The best advice I have is to make sure you truly love it. That advice can be applied to any career choice. The No. 1 reason you should choose your career is because you have a passion for it. It’ll make going to work so much more enjoyable and engaging. This is especially true when it comes to being an on-camera meteorologist. You can’t fake it. People watching can tell if your heart is in it. When they see that it is, they feel they can trust you. Trust is super important when it comes to weather forecasting.

Your support today will help prepare tomorrow’s trustworthy news broadcasters and meteorologists.

Ten tips to ensure an at-home tailgate win

By Shontel Cargill (BS ’10), secretary of the UGA Black Alumni Leadership Council, and David White (ABJ ’10), member of the UGA Black Alumni Leadership Council.

Tailgating looks different this year. We’re not on campus, we’re social distancing from many friends and family members and honestly, we’re just grateful to have a football season. Still, Bulldogs have never been ones to give up—especially when it comes to spending time with fellow alumni and fans. With Homecoming approaching, it’s time to once again rally our enduring spirit of camaraderie and pride. And there’s one event that is sure to do this …

All Bulldogs are invited to UGA’s annual Black Alumni Homecoming Tailgate. This year, we’re taking the reunion virtual. If you haven’t registered yet, it’s not too late. Be sure to order an official Homecoming box (you can always use it for future games if it doesn’t arrive in time) and tune in to our pregame show at 4:30 p.m. on Nov. 21.

No matter who you’re with or how you’re celebrating Homecoming this year, you can still plan a winning tailgate with these top ten tips:

  1. Never Bark Alone, but get that mask on!

You want everyone to have a fun and safe time at your tailgate despite the pandemic. So, make sure to limit the number of guests you invite and have your favorite Bulldog masks handy (check these out from the UGA Bookstore—which also support UGA students!). If you’re not eating or drinking, keep that mask on! Alternatively, you can host a virtual tailgate to cheer on the Dawgs with friends all over the country.

  1. Make a grocery list and plan ahead.

You can’t wait until Saturday morning to start planning—and don’t forget the essentials: food, beverages, water, plates, and don’t forget the ‘Ice, Ice, Baby!’ Now, it’s a lot more complicated than just “food” so be sure you …

  1. Create a menu.

Expert tailgaters know that the food can make or break a tailgate. Put in the work on Pinterest ahead of time to create a menu that tastes good and can be enjoyed throughout the game. And remember your vegetarian/vegan friends and others with dietary restrictions. Share your menu on social media and tag us @ugaalumni ahead of the game.

  1. Prep food in advance.

Make sure your food is well-seasoned! Consider marinating your meats (or jackfruit, tofu, etc.) the night before. And hey—go ahead and set up as much as possible on Friday night.

  1. Remember the coolers.

Some Bulldogs focus on the food and drink, but completely forget one essential item: ice! That little cooler that holds three drinks is not going to cut it if you’re hosting 2+ people. Consider ordering a larger one from the UGA Bookstore or your local sporting goods store ahead of time.

  1. Hydrate and hydrate some more!

You can never have too much water. Fill one of your coolers with bottles of water and leave some out for the end of the game. If a guest hasn’t had a sip of water by the second quarter, you might need to throw a flag and call for a water break.

  1. A sensational setup!

Ensure that your TV and speakers are setup for a front-row experience. Provide comfortable seating options with a good view of the game for each guest. Don’t forget the decorations and your best Georgia gear. Bonus points for setting up games like cornhole to enjoy before kickoff and during halftime.

  1. The perfect pregame playlist! 

Make sure to swag when you surf, tote that Georgia-Florida Line and get ready to Hail to Georgia before kickoff. You are welcome to listen to the playlist we created just for this occasion. Maybe even assign someone the role of drum major—it’s their job to queue up Krypton Fanfare at the beginning of the fourth quarter.

  1. Don’t forget to show off your hard work! #UGAHomecoming 

If we didn’t see it on social, did it happen? Share your tailgating talents on social media with #UGAHomecoming and tag @ugaalumni!

  1. Bring your best Bulldog touchdown celebrations!

What is a Bulldog tailgate without celebrations? We expect Bulldog fans of all ages to come ready with a touchdown dance. Need an easy one? Just channel your inner Sony Michel. 🤗

 

We wish you a happy Homecoming and hope to see you for the virtual Black Alumni Homecoming Tailgate on Nov. 21. As always, Go Dawgs!

UGA Alumni Association welcomes new volunteers to board of directors and leadership councils

The University of Georgia Alumni Association Board of Directors recently welcomed Kevin Abernathy, Elliot Marsh, and Charlita Stephens-Walker as new board members. In addition, 16 new alumni volunteers have joined the Black Alumni Leadership Council, Women of UGA Leadership Council, and the Young Alumni Leadership Council. 

“These graduates reflect the characteristics of a true Bulldog: committed, caring and spirited,” said Meredith Gurley Johnson, executive director of alumni relations. “They are leaders in their communities, and they will bring an important voice to these leadership groups as we seek to foster a supportive and inclusive community for the more than 332,000 living alumni around the world. I’m looking forward to working with each of them.” 

Kevin Abernethy served as president of the Student Government Association before graduating from UGA in 1999. Today, he is an assistant U.S. attorney with the Middle District of Georgia, defending federal agencies and recovering assets for the U.S. Treasury. Abernethy participates in the UGA Mentor Program, was named to UGA’s 40 Under 40 Class of 2013, completed the Harvard Kennedy School’s Emerging Leaders program, is on the School of Public and International Affairs Alumni Board of Directors, and serves on the advisory board for UGA’s vice president of student affairs. 


A Statesboro, Georgia, native, Elliott Marsh earned a bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics and a master’s degree in agricultural leadership from UGA. Today, Marsh is a financial advisor with Edward Jones. He has earned several honors, including the J.W. Fanning Distinguished Young Professional Award from the Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia, and was named to the 40 Under 40 lists for both UGA and Georgia Trend Magazine. Marsh is a past president of UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Alumni Association. 



Charlita Stephens-Walker earned an undergraduate degree in public relations from UGA and is now the national director of corporate and cause partnerships for Boys & Girls Clubs of America. She is an Alliance Theatre trustee and is on the board of Women in Film and Television Atlanta. She guides students through the UGA Mentor Program and is a charter member of The 1961 Club, a giving society established by the UGA Black Alumni Leadership Council. She resides in Decatur, Georgia. 


The following alumni will join the leadership councils for the UGA Alumni Association’s three affinity groups that seek to build relationships with specific alumni populations in the metro Atlanta area:   

Black Alumni Leadership Council  


Ashley Noel Carter (BSA ’10), Army National Guard military officer and contractor, U.S. Army, McDonough, Georgia.  


Stacey Chavis (MSL ’19), managing director, Campaign Academy, Brookhaven, Georgia.  


Corinna Ellis (AB ’92), senior mortgage loan officer in the financial services industry, Sandy Springs, Georgia.  


Extriara Gates (MSW ’11), behavioral health and family support manager, Bobby Dodd Institute; owner, Lavender Grove Psychotherapy, Atlanta, Georgia.  


Sara Hall (BSW ’09, MSW ’11), clinical social worker, hematology and bone marrow transplantation, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.  


Shayla Hill (BBA ’08), assistant director of digital strategy, Georgia Institute of Technology, Tucker, Georgia.

Women of UGA Leadership Council  


Kim Eilers (BSED ’95, MED ’97), real estate agent, Atlanta Fine Homes Sotheby’s International Realty, Smyrna, Georgia.  


Cecilia Epps (BS ’08), freelance sign language interpreter, Lithonia, Georgia.


Christy Hulsey (ABJ ’97), creative director, Colonial House of Flowers, Marietta, Georgia.  


Crystal Ivey (MBA ’14), brand manager for Diet Coke, The Coca-Cola Company, Conyers, Georgia.  


Stephanie Jackson (BBA ’13, MACC ’14), land finance analyst, Ashton Woods Homes, Brookhaven, Georgia.  

Young Alumni Leadership Council  


John Bowden (BBA ’13, BBA ’13), associate broker, Harry Norman Realtors, Atlanta, Georgia. 


Maranie Brown (BSFCS ’12), digital program manager, You Are Here, Smyrna, Georgia. 


Morgan Cook (BBA ’15, MBA ’19), senior risk analyst, Beecher Carlson, Atlanta, Georgia.   


Maxwell Mitchell (BBA ’12, MACC ’13), mergers and acquisitions manager, Deloitte, Atlanta, Georgia.  


Pierce Persons (ABJ ’14), director of operations, Room 422, Atlanta, Georgia.  


To view the full list of UGA Alumni Association board members visit alumni.uga.edu/board-of-directors and alumni.uga.edu/networks for the complete list of leadership council members.

Georgia Law’s first Black graduate, Chester C. Davenport, passes away

Chester C. Davenport and UGA Law students

Davenport, center, with law students during a visit to the UGA School of Law in 2016.

The following message was shared by Georgia Law Dean Rutledge. We join Dean Rutledge in expressing our condolences to the friends and family of Chester Davenport, and are proud of the legacy he leaves on campus–and beyond.

It is with profound sadness that I share that Mr. Chester C. Davenport (LLB ’66), the University of Georgia School of Law’s first African-American graduate, passed away this past Friday, August 7.

Mr. Davenport was an incredibly important figure in our school’s history. He was a leader. He graduated in the top five percent of the Class of 1966 and served as a founding member and Executive Editor of the Georgia Law Review. He was a successful attorney, public servant and businessman. Mr. Davenport was also a regular supporter of the School of Law and the university throughout his life. The UGA chapter of the Black Law Students Association bears his name, and he received the law school alumni association’s highest honor — the Distinguished Service Scroll Award — in 2016. These are only a few highlights of his life.

We are in communication with Mr. Davenport’s family and will share information about memorial services as it becomes available. In the meantime, please keep his family in your prayers and thoughts during this time of mourning.

Peter B. “Bo” Rutledge
Dean & Herman E. Talmadge Chair of Law

Chloe Washington (BS ’07) is here to help

Chloe Washington (BS ’07) is a woman filled with passion. She is passionate about her work, passionate about helping children and passionate about the University of Georgia.

As a senior program manager in marketing operations at Mailchimp in Atlanta, she loves working for an organization focuses on helping small businesses be successful, and she enjoys mentoring those early in their career to help them acquire the skills to succeed and find their career passion.

Washington is equally passionate about the University of Georgia. In high school, she wanted to attend a good school with lots of team spirit, and UGA fit the bill. She still gets chills when she heads to Athens because it feels like coming home; she met some of her closest friends at UGA, and she stays in touch with former professors. She graduated in 2007 with a fashion merchandising degree from the College of Family and Consumer Sciences and then found her way into project management. There’s been no stopping her since.

She makes it a habit to attend events with several alumni groups, including Women of UGA, UGA Black Alumni and UGA Young Alumni. She participates in UGA’s “Give That Dawg a Bone,” by writing letters to incoming freshmen. She finds it fulfilling to share tips and advice with these new students. She always includes her email address and some of the students keep in touch with her throughout their college career.

Washington’s best advice to college students is to find a balance between freedom and discipline, and to leave space to explore new options.

“There’s nothing wrong with changing course, and being willing to pivot can lead to new opportunities,” Washington says.

In addition to helping college students, Washington is passionate about helping children. She has spent a lot of time volunteering with a nonprofit organization whose mission is to bring joy to children experiencing homelessness through the magic of birthdays. Although the organization is headquartered in Dallas, Washington saw a great need for it in Atlanta, and she was instrumental in helping to get it started there. It is now a regular program at three different shelters in Atlanta.

Washington also has had the opportunity to share her love of the Bulldogs with her cousin and uncle, who also attended UGA.

“Football season is really an exciting time for my family because red and black runs deep in our blood,” Washington says.

At home with the kids this summer?

By Frances Beusse and Jennifer Johnson, UGA Alumni Association

Summer is officially here, but it looks a little different than those past. If your traditional summer plans have been canceled, we’ve put together a few UGA-themed activities to enjoy with your kids instead.

Scroll through each section below (swipe on mobile) and have a wonderful summer, Dawgs!

Head Outdoors

State Botanical Garden of Georgia

Scavenger Hunt

Explore the great outdoors by participating in one of the many scavenger hunts available at the Botanical Gardens of Georgia.

Green Thumb

Plant a garden with tips from UGA Extension Office and 4-H.

Concrete Canvas

Grab some chalk and create your best “Go Dawgs,” Super G or Bulldog driveway art.

Get Active

UGA Cross Country Student Athlete Morgan Green Training

Dancing Shoes

Candace Haynes is teaching virtual dance classes presented by the Black Alumni Leadership Council. Check the alumni events calendar to attend the next one!

Football Ready

Get in football shape! UGA Football Director of Strength and Conditioning Scott Sinclair has posted several workouts on Twitter so you can follow along at home.

Read Together

UGA Alumni Author Books for Kids

Young Adults

Is your older child into the Young Adult Fantasy genre? Check out Rebecca Ross (AB ’12) and Jackson Pearce (AB ’07), authors who both graduated from Franklin College with degrees in English.

The Magician’s Hat

For younger readers, check out “The Magician’s Hat” by former UGA football player and Super Bowl champion, Malcolm Mitchell (AB ’15).

Virtual Camp

In addition to writing children’s books, Malcolm also provides a free summer READCamp for K-12 students through his Share the Magic Foundation.

Be A Star

Rennie Curran (BBA ’17) is a former UGA Football player and Class of 2020 40 Under 40 Honoree. He wrote the children’s book, “What Does It Take To Be A Star?” with his daughter Eleana.

Enjoy the Arts

UGA Student Playing the Trumpet

At Home Museum

Explore the Georgia Museum of Art at Home. Learn more about glass art and oil abstractions—or find toddler activities like swipe art and more.

Concerts

Watch Hodgson at Home presented by the UGA School of Music.

Coloring Time

Uga X Coloring PageGrab your crayons, markers or colored pencils and enjoy these coloring pages from the UGA Alumni Association and UGA Athletic Association—no need to stay in the lines!

Take a Virtual Trip

UGA Sanford Stadium Aerial

Alaska

Learn about Alaskan native culture and traditions by watching 2019 Peabody Nominee Molly of Denali on PBS Kids.

Sanford Stadium

Do your kids like Minecraft? Take a Minecraft virtual tour of Sanford Stadium or check out the 2020 virtual Commencement created by UGA students.

Camp

Virtually visit 4-H summer camps supported by UGA and participate in daily activities ranging from environmental education to livestock judging!

For more information and resources, please visit the State Botanical Garden of Georgia, 4-H or Georgia Public Broadcasting.

A message on recent events

From the desk of Alumni Relations Executive Director Meredith Gurley Johnson:

Fellow Bulldogs,

I write today to share in the grief and frustration of continued racial discrimination and injustice in our country. My heart aches for the countless African American victims of violence and for their loved ones. The UGA Alumni Association exists to bring together Bulldogs–from all walks of life, cultures and beliefs–year-round, worldwide and lifelong. This moment calls for us to come together. We are taking this week to pause, listen and reflect on ways we can strengthen the bonds between our alumni. The Bulldog spirit is stronger because of our diversity and as one powerful voice, we can overcome today’s circumstances. Together, we can build a better world and move forward. We are UGA Alumni, and we Never Bark Alone.

Our Black Alumni Leadership Council president, Ericka Davis, shared a heartfelt message earlier this week, and it eloquently expresses what we’re feeling.

Meredith Gurley Johnson (BSFCS ’00, MED ’16)
Executive Director, Alumni Relations
University of Georgia

From the desk of Black Alumni Leadership Council President Ericka Davis:

UGA Community,

These are unprecedented times in our country right now. The recent tragic, violent and inhumane deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor has shocked, angered and hurt us to our core. It has left many of us feeling helpless and powerless as we cry out and steadily wait for the wheels of justice to turn. But that doesn’t mean that we are helpless or powerless.

As protests take place around the country, this is an opportunity to stand in solidarity with those who peacefully advocate for justice, one of the pillars of the Arch. We can support programs and initiatives that uphold the tenets of our best and defining historical legacy of nonviolent social change exhibited by Charlayne Hunter-Gault, Hamilton Holmes and Mary Frances Early. We can advocate for public policies that will truly create that “more perfect union” we all strive for.

Part of our motto is to serve and inquire into the nature of things so it is incumbent upon us to take that charge and find better solutions to address equity and inclusion for current and future generations to come both on and off campus. Never has there been a more critical time than this to affirm and support each other, students and alumni alike through both words and actions that express our humanity, compassion, understanding and empathy.

You are not alone. You do matter. Your value is immeasurable and your contribution can never be diminished.

Stay safe, stand for what is right and never lose hope.

Ericka Davis (AB ’93)
President, Black Alumni Leadership Council
University of Georgia

Finding humor in the little things during shelter-in-place

By Ericka Davis (AB ’93), president of the UGA Black Alumni Leadership Council

This pandemic took us all by surprise.

One minute, I was celebrating the naming of the Mary Frances Early College of Education and returning from a great weekend at the Alumni Leadership Assembly. It seems like the next minute, I was back on campus in a mask moving my daughter out of her dorm two months early.

These are unprecedented times and they can easily be overwhelming. The good news is that there is a light at the end of this tunnel and it burns in our hearts as bright as Sanford Stadium at the start of the fourth quarter. The light inspires us to persevere, never lose hope, stay strong and be encouraged. I have found that light shining in the most unexpected places like Zoom meet-ups, FaceTime conversations and GroupMe chats. I have found that light within the Bulldog Nation where, even in a pandemic, we Never Bark Alone.

I have especially found it in daily adventures with my favorite Bulldog as we shelter-in-place together. I’m hoping that wherever you are as you read this and watch our vlog (below), you’re finding that light as well and that you never lose sight of it.

Events

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