Alumni Association events and other events involving UGA

Don’t miss Peabody’s ‘Stories of the Year’

What are the Peabody Awards?

The Peabody Awards are a true gem in the University of Georgia’s crown. For those who don’t know what the Peabody Awards are, let me get you up to speed:

The National Association of Broadcasters formed a committee in the 1930s to establish a prestigious award similar to the Pulitzer Prize for excellence in broadcasting. Lambdin Kay, manager of WSB Radio in Atlanta, asked John Drewry, dean of the Grady School of Journalism, to sponsor the award, upon the recommendation of Lessie Smithgall, a graduate who worked at the station.

The committee named the award posthumously for George Foster Peabody, a Georgia native and successful investment banker whose philanthropic interests included the university. The first awards were issued in 1941. The Peabody Awards now include a wide range of broadcasting—from TV and blogs to cable to streaming network programs and websites. As the platforms for storytelling multiply, the Peabody Awards will continue to evolve, highlighting Stories That Matter across media.

So now you know and can share that with your friends and family when you’re enjoying programs like

Or when you’re adding any of Zach Armstrong’s watch list recommendations from this past May.

Peabody Awards App for iOS

The Peabody Awards App for iOS is available. It was developed in collaboration with the New Media Institute in UGA’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication. In addition to feature articles and videos from the Peabody Digital Network, users can explore recent winners and pick favorite programs to watch now or later.

 

“Peabody Presents: Stories of the Year” on FX

If you weren’t able to attend the 78th Annual Peabody Awards Ceremony in New York City (don’t worry, I didn’t make the invite list, either), you can still get a closer look at recent winners and how they are address pressing social issues and share Stories That Matter.

That’s because Peabody and FX have partnered to create a documentary-style TV special, Peabody Presents: Stories of the Year, which will air at 10:30 p.m. on Sunday, July 7.

It will showcase award-winning programming that features diverse narratives tackling important issues. The program will intertwine conversations about race, the LGBTQ experience, the impact of the #MeToo movement and journalistic integrity with footage from this year’s awards ceremony that was held in May.

Hasan Minhaj, a two-time Peabody Award-winner, will moderate an intimate discussion among fellow storytellers representing programs released in 2018 to receive a Peabody Award:

  • Steven Canals, co-creator, executive producer and writer of the FX series Pose;
  • Paula Lavigne, ESPN investigative reporter for “Spartan Silence: Crisis at Michigan State”;
  • Terence Nance, filmmaker and creator of Random Acts of Flyness on HBO; and
  • Tracy Heather Strain, director/writer of the PBS/WNET documentary Lorraine Hansberry: Sighted Eyes/Feeling Heart.

We hope you’ll tune in and join us in celebrating UGA’s role in this important awards program.

UGA Young Alumni Night at SweetWater: A timeline

There was excitement in the air. A sea of red and black. Loud voices Calling the Dawgs.

No, it wasn’t a fall Saturday in Athens. It was a hot summer evening in Atlanta. I was at my (ashamedly) very first UGA Young Alumni event. Three years post-graduation and I finally made it!

Here’s my night in review: 

5:05 p.m. Hit the road to Atlanta from Athens where I sing karaoke all the way down 316.

6:30 p.m. Take a power nap because I can’t hang like a college kid any more.

7:00 p.m. Put on my best red and black outfit.

7:30 p.m. Meet up with friends and fellow Dawgs — some of whom I hadn’t seen since English 1001.

8:30 p.m. Request my Uber to SweetWater.

8:31 p.m. Take an Uber selfie.

Uber Selfie
8:55 p.m. Arrive at SweetWater and stop by the registration table to check in. I pat myself on the back for registering early since tickets at the door were more expensive ;)

UGA Young Alumni Night at SweetWater

9:00 p.m. (okay, it was more like 8:56 p.m.) Grab my first beer. Cheers!

9:15 p.m. Catch up with a college friend who recently accepted a new job at Cox Enterprises.

9:30 p.m. Tour SweetWater’s newly renovated taproom and learn that there’s 24 (!) beers on tap. Time to try another!

9:45 p.m. The bartender pours my second local brew.

10:00 p.m. The band starts playing Backstreet Boys so I obviously hit the dance floor.

Atlanta Wedding Band

10:15 p.m. Indulge in some barbecue from SweetWater’s new in-house catering kitchen. It was delicious!

10:30 p.m. Lead a group in Calling the Dawgs! My bark still needs some work before football season begins.

10:45 p.m. Pose with friends and UGA props at the photobooth — no, I’m not sharing those photos.

11:00 p.m. I have another beer … or two.

12:00 p.m. Close down the joint and request another Uber because #responsible.

The Young Alumni Leadership Council meets regularly in Atlanta and hosts events and programs  like this throughout the year. Learn more about getting involved. 

And, be sure to mark your calendar for next year’s UGA Alumni Night at SweetWater. Not only is it an awesome night of reminiscing, drinks and dancing, but a portion of my ticket supported UGA scholarships so I also felt good about giving back to my favorite university.

Congratulations, 2019 40 Under 40!

40 Under 40 Logo

We’re proud to announce the 40 Under 40 Class of 2019 today! This program, in its ninth year, celebrates the achievements of successful UGA graduates under the age of 40–a set of alumni who are leading the pack in their industries and communities. These young leaders will be recognized during the ninth annual 40 Under 40 Awards Luncheon Sept. 13 in the Tate Student Center on campus. If you’re interested, please join us for this special event.

Each Honoree Stands Out

The 2019 class includes a few names you might recognize:

  • Allison R. Schmitt, a gold medal-winning Olympic swimmer
  • Malcolm Mitchell, Super Bowl champion and children’s author
  • Will Carr, a correspondent for ABC News on a national level

But even if you don’t know the names of everyone on the list, you’ll still be impressed at the caliber of these graduates working in everything from law and politics, to health care, nonprofit and food and beverage. For example, Tim Fleming is Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp’s chief of staff and Catherine Marti is a cardiologist at Piedmont Heart Institute focused on heart failure and transplant cardiology.

“We are excited to unveil this year’s class of 40 Under 40 and welcome them back home to Athens for the awards luncheon in September,” said Meredith Gurley Johnson, executive director of alumni relations. “I am always amazed by the excellence of our young alumni. These outstanding individuals exemplify leadership in their industries and communities.”

The Competition

Talk about a competitive selection process: nominations for 40 Under 40 were open from February to April, and more than 400 alumni were nominated for this year’s class. Honorees, of course, must have attended UGA and they have to uphold the Pillars of the Arch: wisdom, justice and moderation. Additional criteria are available on the 40 Under 40 webpage.

“The achievements of our nominated alumni each year make it hard to narrow down the list to just 40 honorees, and this year was no exception,” said Johnson. “We are proud of all of these outstanding young graduates. Their drive and focus inspires the UGA community.”

Ok, Ok, Show Me the List!

This year’s 40 Under 40 honorees, including their city, title and employer, are listed below in alphabetical order:

The Event

As we said earlier, if you’re interested in attending the 2019 40 Under 40 Awards Luncheon in Athens on Friday, September 13, please register today! *If you’re an honoree, please use the registration link provided to you by the Alumni Relations team.

UGA in Washington reception reunites alumni, friends

UGA alumni at DC event

Hundreds of alumni were in attendance at the UGA in Washington reception on June 19.

The University of Georgia brought a little bit of Athens to D.C. during its annual UGA in Washington reception on June 19 at Union Station.

The event was an occasion for UGA alumni and friends in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area to connect with one another as well as with UGA President Jere W. Morehead, UGA Vice President for Government Relations Toby Carr, and special guest UGA head football coach Kirby Smart.

More than 140 UGA alumni work on Capitol Hill. Among those in attendance at the reception were Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue (DVM ’71) and Congressmen Buddy Carter (BSPH ’80), Rick Allen and Jody Hice.

In attendance at the UGA in Washington event were, from left, UGA Vice President for Government Relations Toby Carr, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, U.S. Rep. Buddy Carter and UGA President Jere W. Morehead.

“UGA in Washington is always a wonderful opportunity to meet with our remarkable D.C. alumni,” said Meredith Gurley Johnson, executive director of alumni relations. “We are proud to have such a significant presence in the capital with over 5,000 alumni living in the area and our Washington Semester Program students living and learning in Delta Hall.”

Since Delta Hall’s opening in 2015, more than 250 UGA students have taken classes, participated in internships and immersed themselves in D.C.’s vibrant culture. More than 150 of those students have remained in the area after graduation and have stayed involved with the university through the D.C. Dawgs alumni chapter.

The D.C. alumni chapter is one of the most active in the country and hosts dozens of professional development and cultural events every year, in addition to game watching parties during football season. All UGA supporters are invited to participate in events and programs hosted by local alumni chapters.

Five punny reasons you don’t want to miss UGA Young Alumni Night at SweetWater

We know you don’t really need an excuse to go to SweetWaterit kind of sells itself. But indulge us anyway. Here are five reasons missing this annual event would be un-beer-able:    

  1. Don’t worry, beer hoppy. What better way to spend a summer Friday than surrounded by fellow Bulldogs? Reminisce about sunny afternoons on north campus, be grateful you’re not spending your evening cramming in the MLC and count down the days until football season returns ( … it’ll be 64 from Young Alumni Night).

    UGA Young Alumni Night at SweetWater
  2. New taproom? Ale yeah! Did you know that SweetWater recently renovated and reopened its much-anticipated taproom? The new space allows for 24 different beers to be available on tap. Yeah, you read that right. 
  3. Hip hops. A local Atlanta band will be performing some of your favorite songs all night long. Pretend you’re back in Athens at the 40 Watt, Georgia Theatre or Hendershots.

    UGA Young Alumni Night at SweetWater
  4. Pitcher perfect. Take a selfie, pose with friends and make the perfect boomerang glass clink. Your Instagram feed will thank you.

    UGA Young Alumni Night at SweetWater
  5. You’re supporting students – thank brew very much! A portion of your ticket price will help fund UGA student scholarships.  

Bonus reason: FOOD.  

Let’s be honest – you don’t have anything planned for next Friday anyway. Grab a friend (or five), request an Uber/Lyft/Bird/Lime and we’ll see you there. Cheers! 

 June 28
9 p.m. to midnight 

UGA Mentor Program – LeBria Casher

Photo of student typing on computer with mentor.

Mentors and mentees communicate via email, text messages, phone calls and in-person meetings.

The UGA Mentor Program is the first comprehensive mentorship initiative at the University of Georgia. It will launch publicly on Wednesday, June 12. Alumni, including staff and faculty, are invited to create a profile at mentor.uga.edu if they are interested in mentoring a student. When students return to campus in August, they will begin pairing with alumni so that mentoring can begin this fall.

LeBria Casher

A successful pilot of the program was executed this spring with over 115 mentor pairs, including LeBria Casher, a rising senior majoring in English and comparative literature. LeBria’s mentor was Allison Ausband (ABJ ’83), who graduated with a journalism degree, serves on the UGA Board of Trustees and is the senior vice president of in-flight service at Delta Air Lines. LeBria shared a little about her experience piloting the new UGA Mentor Program…

What made you want to be a mentee?

When I heard about the UGA Mentor Program, I knew without a doubt what a wonderful opportunity it was and that I should apply immediately. Various organizations at UGA have shown me what it’s like to be a student mentor or mentee, but the UGA Mentor Program offered me a chance to connect with an alumnus on a personal level. I was able to choose a mentor that would share my major, interests, or experience at UGA. Also, I wanted to have a mentor who would support my goals and help me develop them.

What was your biggest fear?

I was scared that I would have a mentor who didn’t care, but I was quickly put at ease. My mentor, Allison, genuinely supported my ambitions and talked me through my goals. Also, I’ve seen and heard how the alumni who participate in the UGA Mentor Program want to see students succeed.

What has been the biggest surprise?

The biggest surprise was the flexibility of the UGA Mentor Program. It wasn’t time-consuming. It didn’t interfere with my class schedule, work, or any other obligations. I got to establish how frequently I wanted to communicate with my mentor, and we communicated monthly via email, telephone, and in-person.

Why has this been so meaningful for you?

I enjoyed having someone in my corner who wants the best for me. Despite the official mentoring relationship ending, I feel comfortable contacting my mentor and knowing she is still willing to offer me advice.

Describe the UGA Mentor Program in three words.

Investment. Significant. Worthwhile.

What would you tell someone considering UGA Mentor Program?

Don’t hesitate to apply! It really is a great program because there’s a mentor and commitment that’s right for everybody. Having a mentor is a great chance to look at someone else’s journey from UGA to where they are now — especially if it aligns with your interests. Mentors are a valuable source of information, and you get out of the mentoring relationship what you put into it. You never know what good will come from the relationship. Everyone should take the time to look at the website, the FAQs, and contact the UGA Mentor Program team if they are unsure of anything.

 

Interested in learning more about the UGA Mentor Program?

2019 Alumni Weekend earned an A+

The 2019 Alumni Weekend earned an A+ in my book. I might be slightly biased since I helped plan the event, but I think this video will prove my point:

If you weren’t able to attend, I’m happy to provide you with a quick “report” on how things went … ultimately to create a little FOMO so you’ll be sure to mark your calendar for next year (hint-hint: March 26-28, 2020).

THURSDAY

100+ alumni and friends gathered in the Stelling Family Study in Moore-Rooker Hall, one of the newest buildings in the Terry College Business Learning Community. It’s a beautiful space, made even lovelier by the UGA Alumni Association events team (and yes, the tables were named for places on campus):

Kessel-Family-Study

Orientation-Dinner-Table

Folks grabbed their swag backpacks and a T-shirt (shown here on a few of the staffers who made Alumni Weekend come to life):

Alumni-Weekend-Staff

Look at all those goodies packed inside that backpack!

Backpack-Swag

During dinner, we heard from UGA President Jere W. Morehead (JD ’80):

Jere-Morehead-Orientation-Dinner

We had the opportunity to ask him a few questions, like “What are you most proud of since you became president?” and “What is your favorite movie?” I think he enjoyed that last one:

Jere-Morehead-Orientation-Dinner-2

People were enthralled and impressed by how much is happening at UGA these days …

Orientation-Dinner-Attendee

Orientation-Dinner-Attendee-2

Including Matthew Auer, dean of the School of Public and International Affairs:

Dean-Auer

Yes, even yours truly:

Elizabeth-Elmore-Orientation-Dinner

Then, we closed out the evening and headed home to get a good night’s rest before class the next morning …… PSYCH.

What’s a trip back to Athens without seeing a little music in the best college music town in America?

GATH-Marquee

Yacht-Rock-on-Stage

Group-at-Yacht-Rock

FRIDAY

On Friday, we greeted the day at Bolton Dining Commons. This isn’t the Bolton of yesteryear; this is a new space that is straight out of a Harry Potter movie. Seriously:

Bolton-Dining-Commons

Credit: Bruner/Cott Architects

And yes, students can have Super G waffles at the 24-hour breakfast station. #jealousy

G-Waffle-Bolton-Dining-Commons

Lots of attendees met their Alumni Weekend “classmates” during these meals. Just imagine the memories they are exchanging from their time on campus:

Bolton-Dining-Commons-Chat

Then it was off to first period – we served up classes taught by three incredible faculty members.

Gary T. Green, assistant dean of academic affairs and professor in the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, who taught “Challenges Facing Resource Management: Implications from a Changing Society.”

Gary-Green-Teaching

Maria Navarro, professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, who taught “Hunger Who? An Introduction to Global Food Insecurity.”

Maria-Navarro-Teaching

Jenna R. Jambeck, associate professor in the College of Engineering, who taught “Marine Debris from Land to Sea.”

Jenna-Jambeck-Teaching

During second period, classes included: “Fairy Tales: An Examination of Hidden and Gendered Messages” by Juanita Johnson-Bailey, director of the Institute for Women’s Studies.

Juanita-Johnson-Bailey-Teaching

“Bombs, Bugs, Drugs and Thugs: The United States in a Hostile World” by Loch K. Johnson, Regents Professor of Public and International Affairs.

Loch-Johnson-Teaching

… and an encore of “Challenges Facing Resources Management – Implications for a Changing Society” by Gary Green.

With all that learning, it was time for another meal break at Bolton:

Realenn-Watters-Bolton-Dining-Commons-Lunch

Gentleman-at-Bolton-Lunch

Pair-at-Bolton-for-LunchAnd then one more class period for the day that featured:

  • “From Babe Ruth to LeBron James: How Changes in Media Shape Perspectives on Sports Heroes” by Vicki Michaelis, the John Huland Carmical Chair in Sports Journalism & Society
  • “What About Small Town? Solving Rural Housing Problems When Everyone is Thinking About Cities” with Kim Skobba, the director of UGA’s Housing and Demographics Research Center.
  • and an encore of Maria Navarro’s “Hunger Who? An Introduction into Global Food Insecurity.”

Then, just like any Friday for a student – classes ended and we left the Miller Learning Center to begin our weekend. After a little free time, we reconvened at Wall & Broad in downtown Athens. This event space is run by UGA alumni and the food is catered by LRG Provisions, the sister restaurant of Last Resort Grill, another mainstay on the Athens food scene. It was a beautiful space:

Wall-Broad-Decor

And the mixing and mingling was in full swing:

Wall-Broad-Mingling

Wall-Broad-Mingling-3

Wall-Broad-Mingling-2

Look – even Professor Skobba joined in the fun!

Kim-Skobba-Wall-and-Broad

At 6:30, the reception concluded and folks headed to the Classic Center just a few blocks away for the TEDxUGA, a celebration of “ideas worth spreading.” This event is spearheaded by UGA’s New Media Institute and features student, alumni and faculty speakers. Interested in who was in the lineup this year – check it out.

TEDxUGA-Decor

I was inspired by all of the speakers, but particularly enjoyed hearing from Ansley Booker (MS ’13), the interim director for Mercer University’s Educational Opportunity Center (and a member of the UGA Alumni Association’s Black Alumni Leadership Council). Her TED Talk made me want to go out and recruit every young girl in America to enter a STEM field.

Malcolm Mitchell (AB ’15), is a former UGA football standout who went on to be a Super Bowl Champion as a wide receiver for the New England Patriots. He also is the author of a children’s book, The Magician’s Hat, and is passionate about youth literacy. His TED Talk emphasized the power of overcoming obstacles and while he announced his official retirement from professional football during his talk, he cited that he’s ready for what’s next.

TEDxUGA-Malcolm-Mitchell

And I also was inspired by A.C. Williams, a third-year student studying management information systems and international business. As an experienced event director in the Esports world, he opened my eyes to the community that is thriving around gaming.

And after a long day of class and TEDxUGA inspiration, Alumni Weekend participants headed back to their hotels and homes for the night.

SATURDAY

On Saturday, we enjoyed a brunch in the Sanford Stadium SkyClub. The weather was beautiful and everyone was in high spirits!

Brunch-Group-Mingling

Brunch-Pair

Look! Even Professor Navarro joined us:

Maria-Navarro-Brunch

Student Alumni Council President Nash Davis ’19 welcomed attendees to the “Commencement Brunch” and everyone laughed when he officially conferred their Alumni Weekend degrees on them.

Nash-Davis-Brunch

Brunch-Group-Stands

Then it was off to grab some grub and take pictures in the photo booth:

Brunch-Line

Brunch-PhotoBooth

A special guest even joined us for this special occasion:

Brunch-PhotoBooth-Glory-Glory

Brunch-PhotoBooth-Hairy-Dawg

Brunch-with-Hairy-Dawg

Brunch-with-Hairy-Dawg-Pal

And then Meredith Gurley Johnson (BSFCS ’00, MED ’16), executive director of the UGA Alumni Association, closed out the brunch with a few remarks and a toast to a great weekend:

Brunch-Meredith-and-Hairy

Brunch-Group-Toast

While this was technically the “end” of Alumni Weekend, we lined up a few optional activities that everyone could attend on their own. Those events included a UGA baseball game vs. LSU, a “One Man Star Wars Trilogy” performance, an exhibit at the UGA Special Collections Libraries, and a private tour of the Georgia Museum of Art with GMOA Director Bill Eiland.

Baseball-Game-Hairy-Dawg

Some attendees participated in a tour of the newly renovated West End Zone of Sanford Stadium led by Colby DeCesare, a graduate assistant with the UGA Athletic Association:

West-End-Zone-Tour

West-End-Zone-Tour-Locker-Room

Savage-Pads-Pose

Sanford-Stadium-Group-Pic-on-Field

IN SUMMARY

It was truly a great weekend that made me proud of my alma mater and reminded me why I love this place so much.

My key takeaways include:

  • Our president LOVES this place – he attended school here, has been on the faculty since 1986, is passionate about changing lives through education, and is dreaming big about the impact UGA can have on the state and beyond.
  • I miss the dining halls – adult life has its pros, but cooking all your own meals is not one of them.
  • Our faculty are ROCKSTARS – why did I not go to every single office hour that was offered by my professors? They are inspiring, committed and are changing the world!
  • Nothing beats a Saturday between the hedges – whether it’s during football season or during a special event like Alumni Weekend, there’s just a good feeling emanating from that field.
  • OUR ALUMNI ARE THE BEST IN THE WORLD – I enjoyed meeting new alumni throughout the weekend (and reconnecting with old friends, too). We’re so diverse, passionate and very much in love with this school. It makes me proud to call myself a Georgia Bulldog.

As we learned in college, every good “report” closes with a summary statement. I’d have to say that my summary is simple: The 2019 Alumni Weekend was one of the best alumni events I have been able to help plan and I can’t wait for our alumni to see what we have in store for March 26-28, 2020. See you then! GO DAWGS.

What is Georgia Giving Week? And Why Does It Matter?

Georgia Giving Week is a week to rally Bulldog Nation in the spirit of philanthropy. It’s just one week to help our beloved alma mater! You may be thinking that the birthplace of public higher education doesn’t need an extra $10 from you – what will that do for a huge, enduring institution like UGA? Well, it can do more than you’d think!

As alumni, we always love to see Georgia thrive. Remember the pride you felt when Sony Michel raced across the goal line in double overtime at the Rose Bowl in 2018? It’s easy to cheer on our team during a football game. But let’s celebrate our school on and off the field – making a gift is a tangible way of cheering Georgia on.

We can change lives by helping a worthy student earn a college education. Even with competitive tuition rates, the Zell Miller and HOPE scholarships, and federal Pell Grants, many students still face financial obstacles in attending UGA. With scholarship support, we can help students take advantage of everything UGA has to offer without worrying about significant debt weighing them down as they launch their careers. Today, 100 percent of gifts to the Georgia Fund support scholarships.
Giving Week

Did you know that the percentage of alumni participation is a factor in the U.S. News & World Report college rankings? We’ve already reached No. 13 in the list of best public universities, the highest ranking in UGA’s history. But how high can we climb with your help? Our reputation affects how employers, graduate schools and others perceive UGA. The further we reach, the greater the value your college degree.

If that’s not enough reason to make a gift, can I entice you with a discount at the Bookstore?! Stock up on a tailgate tent, new jersey, a Kirby visor and more. With a gift of any size this week, you will get 20% off valid in store and online through April 27*. AND you’ll get a Georgia pennant magnet exclusive to Georgia Giving Week donors.

Last but not least – I hear we have some notable alumni giving personal shoutouts on social media. Make your gift and it could be you …

Give now at givingweek.uga.edu

 

*Technology and textbooks excluded.  

Get Ready for G-Day 2019

football

Mark your calendars! G-Day 2019 is less than a week away. As you prepare to come back to campus for another exciting spring game in Sanford Stadium, here are some fun-filled activities happening before the big game.

Friday, April 19 

5 p.m. – 7 p.m: Jonathan Ledbetter and Isaac Nauta Bookstore Signings

Come to the UGA bookstore to meet and get autographs from some of your favorite UGA greats and NFL prospects! Call or stop by the bookstore to purchase your tickets today!

*Make a gift during the first ever Georgia Giving Week and get 20% off your bookstore purchase! Visit givingweek.uga.edu for more information.

Price: $15 per ticket/signature

 

Saturday, April 20

8:00 a.m. Athens Farmers Market

The Athens Farmers Market at Bishop Park hosts around 45 vendors a weekend, live music, children’s activities and cooking demos.

Location: 705 Sunset Dr., Athens, GA 30606

Price: FREE

 

10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Elijah Holyfield and Mecole Hardman Bookstore Signings

Come to the UGA bookstore to meet and get autographs from some of your favorite UGA greats and NFL prospects! Call or stop by the bookstore to purchase your tickets today!

*Make a gift during the first ever Georgia Giving Week and get 20% off your bookstore purchase! Visit givingweek.uga.edu for more information.

Price: $25 per ticket/signature

 

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. ARTini’s Paint Fundraiser for ESP

Come have some fun with paint with us & help raise some funds for one of our amazing local organizations, Extra Special People!

Location: 337 Prince Ave, Athens, GA 30601

Price: $24, 50% donated to ESP

 

G-Day game information

11 a.m. Gates open

11:15 a.m. Alumni Football game

2 p.m. G-Day game

SEC Clear bag policy will be in effect. Parking is free and open to the public. G-Day game can be viewed on the SEC Network.

 

Chapter Game Watching Parties

Unable to make it to Athens for G-Day? Don’t worry, Bulldawgs never bark alone. Check out the Alumni Event Calendar to see if there is a game watching party near you!

 

Tailgates

MBA Alumni Tailgate: 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Location: Davis Courtyard of Correll Hall on Lumpkin Street

Price: $20 per person, children under 12 free

Register here

MPA GSPA Tailgate: 10:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Location: front lawn Baldwin Hall

Price: FREE

Doc & Roc Henderson Barbeque Tailgate Party: 11 a.m.

Location: Myers Quad

Prices vary based on plate orders. Order plates here.

For more information, visit their Facebook page.

 

Giving Week Starts Now!

G-Day marks the beginning of the first ever Georgia Giving Week, and we’re calling all Dawgs to show their loyalty. Gifts from alumni and friends can help ensure that every deserving student has an opportunity to earn a UGA education regardless of their financial background. Every gift counts. All Giving Week donors will get 20% off at the UGA Bookstore and an exclusive Georgia pennant magnet. Give now at givingweek.uga.edu.

UGA at Oxford event celebrates unique study abroad experience

On Sept. 12, friends of the University of Georgia will convene in London to welcome the newest participants of the UGA at Oxford program and celebrate one of the most unique study abroad experiences UGA has to offer.

For 30 years, UGA students have made their home in the stunning environs of the University of Oxford, enjoying the connection between one of the oldest universities in the United States and one of the oldest universities on the planet.

UGA at Oxford offers a vast array of courses in a wide range of disciplines—humanities, sciences, international affairs, business, communications, law and more—with sessions held throughout the year.

Despite being immersed in the Oxford student experience, UGA study abroad students still pay regular in-state tuition, covered by any existing financial aid—as if they were in Athens taking classes. The courses offer UGA credit towards each student’s major pathway, but they are taught by Oxford faculty in the distinctive Oxford style of undergraduate education.

That distinctive style is characterized by two key features: the “collegiate system” and the “tutorial model.” The collegiate system sees each student taught within the colleges—Oxford has 38 constituent colleges—but completing their education with six, three-hour exams set by the university, encouraging competition among the colleges. The core of a student’s education is made up of weekly, one-on-one, hour-long meetings with one of the college’s fellows, who is often a full professor and world-leading academic.

The tutorial model eschews the type of education that points students to specific lessons and textbook chapters, opting instead for a comprehensive approach in which a student is introduced to all available literature on a subject and must chart their own course. Each week, they create work examining the subject, discuss it with their tutor and defend the work from their tutor’s critiques.

Students who take part in UGA at Oxford are granted access to truly one-of-a-kind facilities. Depending on the focus and/or semester of their program, students live, work and play in the centuries-old halls of Keble College or Trinity College or UGA’s own UGA at Oxford Centre, a renovated nineteenth-century Victorian mansion in north Oxford.

UGA at Oxford alumni leave the program having enjoyed an unparalleled learning experience and embraced a different culture, two things that can have a profound impact on the student experience and, ultimately, our students’ lives.

If you will be in London on Tuesday, Sept. 12, we invite you to join us in welcoming the newest UGA at Oxford students and celebrating the program and people who make this singular learning experience possible.