10 tips for getting your house ready for the spring market

With spring just around the corner, the real estate experts from Bulldog 100 have generously offered some advice if you’re looking to put your house up for sale after the long winter season. From inspections to pricing, here are 10 tips for successfully springing into the housing market.


1. Get a pre-inspection done

Check the attic and crawl space for any issues with water intrusion or rodent activity. If you don’t want to do this yourself, we have home inspector partners who can do a quick four-point inspection of your home just to check for major issues like this.

— Joe Cozart (BSED ’03, MED ’06, PHD ’11 ), Cozart Realty

In this process, they will point out many of the same items a potential buyer’s inspector would discover that might possibly scare off an otherwise great buyer.

— Bob Allen (BBA ’81), Greater Athens Properties


2. Take care of any repairs

Take care of the minor repairs before going to market. If you know something needs to be fixed, get it done before any buyers enter your home. If repairs aren’t addressed in the initial offers, they will still come up during the inspection.

— Scott Talley (AB ’04), 5Market Realty

If you want top dollar, make sure your home does not look like a renovation project to a homebuyer. Check your home for rotten wood on the exterior.

— Blake Underwood (BBA ’04), Athens Real Estate Group

Have a handyman do a lap around the outside of the home to replace any rotten boards. This includes rotten soffit, facia or window trim.

— Joe Cozart


3. Have a purposeful design

Make sure every room in your home has a purpose. Turn a bonus room into a playroom or office space. Defining a use for all parts of your home can help buyers see more value.

— Scott Talley


4. Clean and declutter

Move your boxes to the garage or a pod in the yard. Empty those closets and storage areas to the bare minimum items needed to live a normal, comfortable lifestyle. You probably have not opened some boxes in years, so eliminate them so your space looks larger and inviting.

— Bob Allen

Declutter your home and then get the smaller spaces well-organized. Closets, bathrooms and laundry rooms show much better and appear larger when they are efficiently organized.

— Scott Talley

Deep clean the entire house so that it smells fresh and tidy as potentially buyers tour the property… Too much clutter makes the home feel smaller than it really is.

— Blake Underwood


5. Paint … and repaint

If you need some cosmetic upgrades inside or outside, please consider making the changes needed. If the paint is showing signs of wear and tear, have it painted; maybe it is just the trim outside or old wallpaper that dates the home on the inside. You do not have to completely renovate your home. You just need to make it show as move-in ready for most consumers.

— Bob Allen

Get a fresh coat of paint.  This could be inside or out, especially if it has been more than seven years.

— Joe Cozart

Spend the extra time and money to make sure your home is SHOW READY. Pressure wash, fresh pine straw, declutter closets / garage, clean gutters and please paint that wild color in the dining room to a more neutral color.

— Bonneau Ansley (BBA ’99), Ansley Real Estate


6. Make sure there’s curb appeal

Give your home an exterior face lift. Take a look at your home from the street and examine what could be done to brighten up the front of your house. Landscaping, flowers, mulch, pressure washing or just painting the front door can go a long way.

— Scott Talley

Be sure to dress up the landscaping with fresh pine straw or mulch, trim the shrubs and keep the grass cut.

— Blake Underwood

Curb appeal is very important. The home needs to look its best from the road. If you have to hire a landscaper to get the front of the home looking its best, now is the time to invest in the yard.

— Bob Allen


7. Figure out the best timing

I like to list on a Wednesday night and call for highest and best offers by Sunday evening.

— Bonneau Ansley


8. Price accordingly

Make sure you price the home correctly — use an appraisal or a pricing evaluation.

— Bonneau Ansley

Be sure to price your property at market value. If you price your home correctly, you will see maximum exposure and possibly multiple offers. On the other hand, if you price it too high, the home could sit on the market and ultimately cost you more money.

— Scott Talley


9. Check over your buyer

Make sure you choose a buyer who is pre-qualified to purchase your home.

— Bonneau Ansley


10. Talk to a realtor

Hire an agent that you are comfortable with and is an expert in your market.

— Bonneau Ansley

Call your favorite realtor — or several — to walk through and give opinions on things to do to help the sale and suggested pricing. Realtors do this every day and know the local market better than any website like Zillow.

— Bob Allen

 


The annual Bulldog 100 Celebration takes place on February 5. There, the UGA Alumni Association will reveal the No. 1 fasting-growing business for 2022.

Family ties lead to lesson in giving

Parents’ philanthropy inspires new generation of Bulldogs

Jeff and Allison Mitchell live on a steady diet of maroon and orange in the college town of Blacksburg, Virginia, where both Jeff and Allison are Virginia Tech alumni, regularly attending football games to cheer on the Hokies. Despite this familiar connection with Virginia Tech, their daughter Elizabeth Grace (ABJ ’21) elected to forge her own path at the University of Georgia.

Elizabeth Grace’s time in Athens offered her an education needed to succeed beyond graduation and it provided valuable lessons around the importance of giving and service. So, while Jeff and Allison may have earned their degrees elsewhere, they’re now building a legacy of giving alongside their daughter at UGA.

New Colors, Same Focus

When Elizabeth Grace arrived on campus, Jeff and Allison instantly joined the Bulldog family, swapping out their Hokies’ attire for red and black. They regularly visited the Classic City during Elizabeth Grace’s four years in Athens, engaging, giving and serving, primarily through service on UGA’s Parents Leadership Council, to demonstrate what a legacy of giving looks like.

“We wanted Elizabeth Grace to understand that supporting her university is something she needed to take the long-term view on,” Jeff said. “Don’t put it off and think ‘I’ll start giving later;’ get started now.”

Giving back is as natural for Jeff and Allison as breathing; they provide ample philanthropic support to a host of institutions and organizations, including their alma mater. They lead by example to ensure those lessons of generous giving are passed on to Elizabeth Grace.

Creating a New Legacy

As graduation neared, Jeff and Allison wanted to honor their daughter’s time at UGA and illustrate why giving is important. The Mitchells decided to recognize her with a legacy gift — a philanthropic gift made in honor of her time at UGA — establishing the Elizabeth Grace Mitchell Student Support Fund.

They sought her involvement, working with her to identify what she wanted the fund to address on campus. Elizabeth Grace recommended that the fund provide financial support to students in the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication who are majoring in her field of study, entertainment and media studies (EMST).

“The Mitchell family’s support of student projects will help us fuel EMST film projects – the very heart of the department’s experiential learning efforts,” said Charles Davis (MA ’92) the dean of the Grady College. “This sort of support takes on increasing importance the more hands-on work we do as a college, so we deeply appreciate the fund and what it signifies.”

photo of the Mitchell family with Grady College Dean Charles Davis

Jeff and Allison Mitchell (far left and right) with their daughter, Elizabeth Grace Mitchell (AB ’21) and Grady College Dean Charles Davis (MA ’92) in December 2021.

The fund also gives the opportunity for Elizabeth Grace to engage philanthropically with UGA right after graduation. She’ll contribute directly to it, allowing her to start her own journey of giving while building a legacy that endures long after she’s graduated.

More Opportunities with PLC

In addition to the legacy gift, the Mitchells joined the Parents Leadership Council (PLC) during Elizabeth Grace’s freshman year. Ultimately, this decision launched the couple’s philanthropic journey at UGA.

The PLC offered the chance for their family to build a meaningful connection with the university, including a social network that Jeff and Allison could trust would support Elizabeth Grace during her time in Athens. The service-oriented group provides funding through parents’ annual gifts to various student programs and initiatives on campus.

In the last decade, the group has awarded more than $3.8 million to undergraduate student organizations and is the top supporter of the President’s Venture Fund. The response to these types of needs, as well as the opportunity to help prioritize what needs should be addressed, resonated with Jeff and Allison. It allowed them to proactively help determine how their contributions improved campus—something they offered their daughter when setting up the Elizabeth Grace Mitchell Student Support Fund.

Forever Connected to the Bulldog Family

For Jeff and Allison, establishing the legacy gift for Elizabeth Grace is the culmination of a series of relationships, experiences and opportunities that ultimately will connect them to UGA for the rest of their lives.

“Everybody knows the University of Georgia, but to have your daughter attend from out-of-state and understand the brand and the legacy here, it’s just special,” Jeff said. “We’ve met many, many passionate UGA alumni, and their joy and passion are infectious. You spend any time here, and you just get it. So, we’re happy to celebrate Elizabeth Grace and support the University of Georgia.”

Jeff and Allison hope their philanthropy will inspire other Bulldog parents to establish their own legacies in honor of their students’ UGA experiences. Doing so enables the next generation to strengthen UGA by creating new avenues to success for future Bulldogs.

Want to know more? Consider being a part of parent philanthropy at UGA and establishing your own legacy gift to benefit future generations of Bulldogs! Learn more about UGA’s Parent Fund and Parent Leadership Council.

Learn More About the Parent Fund Learn More About the PLC

Written by Johnathan McGinty (ABJ ’00)

A UGA parent paints the town red (and black)

When the Georgia Bulldogs secured their first national title in 41 years, the outpouring of emotion from University of Georgia alumni and fans was so intense, so widespread, it could’ve painted the sky red and black.

And in New York City, thanks to a UGA student’s parent, it did.

Shortly after the 2022 CFP National Championship finished, the iconic Empire State Building traded its usual illumination for red and black hues, and the world took notice.

But it wasn’t just the Empire State Building. The Helmsley Building at 230 Park Avenue also lit up the night red and black—not just on Monday night, but Sunday and Tuesday, too.

230 Park Avenue in New York City on Tuesday, Jan. 12

Timelapse of 230 Park Avenue the night of Jan. 11

Timelapse of 230 Park Avenue the night of Jan. 11

It all began with Bill Elder, managing director and executive vice president at RXR Realty. Elder, whose youngest daughter, Eliza, is a third-year studying real estate at UGA, had already started planning the lighting of 230 Park Avenue, a building in RXR’s portfolio, when he realized he had an opportunity to go even bigger.

“I had a call scheduled with Tony Malkin [chairman, president and CEO of Empire State Realty Trust, Inc., which owns the Empire State Building], so I thought I’d see if he would do a favor for me,” said Bill. “So, I reached out to him on the Saturday before the game, and I said, ‘My daughter goes to Georgia, and we’re lighting 230 in red and black in honor of the game—do you think you could light up the Empire State Building? And he said ‘Absolutely, done.'”

The following Monday night, Bill was—like the rest of us—consumed by the drama of the national championship’s final minutes and the elation of the celebration that followed, so he didn’t know that Tony Malkin came through on his promise a little bit early: “The World’s Most Famous Building” wore red and black from the moment the Dawgs claimed victory until 2 a.m. Tuesday.

Bill’s role in amplifying the joy of Bulldog Nation is spectacular enough on its own, but it becomes even more so in light of the journey he and his wife Katie took to become UGA fans. Just a few short years ago, the Elders had just a passing familiarity with the university, but once their youngest daughter, Eliza, began to take an interest in attending, things started to change.

“I’ll admit, my first reaction was ‘not a great idea, too big, she’ll get lost,’ but then I went down there, took a tour, and within about 20 or 30 minutes of being on campus, I got immediately comfortable with the place and thought UGA was a great decision,” said Bill.

Katie and Bill Elder at Sanford Stadium

Katie and Bill Elder at Sanford Stadium

Once Eliza became a student, Bill and Katie were approached by members of the Parents Leadership Council (PLC), a group of highly engaged parents who support student-focused organizations and efforts on campus.

“I didn’t realize how much need there was among UGA students,” said Bill. “So, when I heard about the outreach and the kind of need fulfillment that the PLC was doing for these great kids, I was in. How could you not want to help somebody who might be the first person in their whole family to go to college? How could you not want to give students a better chance?”

Bill and Katie have been members of the PLC ever since. Beginning this August, they will serve as chairs of the PLC’s Grants Committee, which administers grants that provide funding to a variety of organizations across UGA’s campus. Last year, the PLC Grants Program awarded 69 grants totaling over $625,000, and the program has awarded more than $3.8 million over its lifetime to groups like Designated Dawgs, the Outreach and Financial Assistance Fund at the UGA Speech and Hearing Clinic, the Student Government Association’s Clothing Closet and the University Health Center’s Counseling and Psychiatric Services Program.

So, when some of Manhattan’s most iconic structures took on the colors of the national champion Georgia Bulldogs, it was an expression of the unbounded joy of alumni and fans who had waited nearly a half-century for a championship, but it was also a culmination of the Elders’ journey.

They are not a family with generations of Bulldogs, they didn’t grow up dreaming of Broad Street or Milledge Avenue, but they believe in the university and its mission just as strongly as a third-generation Dawg from Marietta.

“We went from knowing very little to humbly hoping that we can make a difference at the university,” said Bill. “UGA has embraced us, and we embrace them. We’re really happy to be a part of it, and we’re really proud to be a part of it.”

The Jerry Tanner Show – Jerry Watches the National Championship

Relive the before, during and after of the greatest football game ever played with your good friend Jerry, who—like you—spent his entire paycheck on championship merch.

Athens will be rocking on Saturday, Jan. 15, as Bulldog Nation celebrates the 2021 NATIONAL CHAMPION Georgia Bulldogs! Find out more about the parade and celebration on alumni.uga.edu/football.

Jerry Tanner is everyone you’ve ever met at a UGA tailgate, everyone who’s ever talked about Georgia football by your cubicle, and every message board poster who claims to have a cousin who cut Vince Dooley’s grass. He’s a UGA alumnus, he’s a college football fanatic with a Twitter addiction, and he’s definitely a real person and not a character played by Clarke Schwabe.

Full-circle moments: The UGA Mentor Program at its finest

[Image above (L-R) – Christina Carrere (BS ’11) and Kelly Strachan (AB ’21) on a balcony overlooking the West Wing of the White House, Spring 2021.]

In a perfect world, participation in the University of Georgia Mentor Program begins as a student in Athens and continues for a lifetime—once a Dawg, always a Dawg—once a UGA Mentee, forever a UGA Mentor. That’s what’s shaping up for Kelly Strachan (AB ’21).

Finding her footing as a first-gen student

The first in her family to attend college, Kelly Strachan realized how overwhelming navigating life at UGA could be when she moved into Creswell Hall her freshman year. Finding mentorship within the UGA alumni base helped her grow confidence and find direction. Kelly took the initiative to find three different mentors during her time at UGA. She first connected with Brian Dill (AB ’94, MBA ’19). Kelly credits Brian, VP of External Affairs for Tanner Health Systems, with helping her find her passion for health administration and policy. Later, Marylen Rimando (PHD ’19), who represents strong women in the field as a health scientist with bioinformatics firm IHRC, Inc., became Kelly’s mentor. Kelly has stayed in touch with both her earlier mentors, but it was her mentorship with Senior Medicare Program Examiner with the White House Office of Management and Budget, Health Division, Christina Carrere (BS ’11), that has proven to be truly life-changing.

From SPIA to the White House

Kelly was a student in UGA’s School of Public and International Affairs when she first reached out to Christina through the UGA Mentor Program. Christina says a part of her heart will always be in Athens, but since her work largely keeps her confined to Washington, DC, she looked for more consistent and meaningful ways to stay engaged with UGA and its students. The UGA Mentor Program fit the bill. What started as a general informational interview with Kelly, quickly grew into deeper discussions about graduate school, career paths, personal challenges each have faced, diversity in the workplace, resulting in a connection that has long outlasted the formal mentor-mentee cycle in the UGA mentor program (typically 16 weeks).

“Kelly and I initiated our mentor-mentee relationship during the COVID-19 pandemic, which was important given my work in health policy and her interest in the field. The timeliness of the pandemic gave us opportunities to discuss the different roles individuals play in responding to something of this magnitude as well as the good, bad and ugly of how policy is formed and shaped using real-world examples in real time,” said Christina.

Several months into their connection, Christina wrote a letter of recommendation for Kelly to Christina’s graduate school alma mater (John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where Kelly is now a graduate student and a graduate teaching assistant). Later, Kelly spotted a posting on Christina’s LinkedIn page about an internship on Christina’s team at the White House. Kelly applied and got the position all on her own. It just so happened that Christina was on a leave of absence throughout the application and interview process. Back in time for Kelly’s first day, Christina counts taking Kelly on her first tour of the White House complex and grabbing a picture with her outside the West Wing (see photo above) as a cherished memory.

Christina says, “Seeing a relationship that started as a virtual connection grow into all of this is a testament to the power of the UGA Mentor Program and its ability to connect students and alumni across the world in meaningful ways.”

Paying it forward

Even while still a student at UGA, Kelly wanted to make certain that every student experienced how giving and supportive the UGA community can be. “One of my proudest roles was being an ambassador for the Mentor Program,” Kelly says. Ambassadors of the UGA Mentor Program work with other students and UGA Career Center staff to foster a culture of mentorship at UGA by developing programming, partnerships and marketing strategies that bring heightened awareness to the UGA Mentor Program.

Recently, Kelly heard from previous mentor Marylen about her current mentee, a UGA student who wants to follow a path similar to Kelly’s. Kelly was all too happy to connect with her and plans to stay in touch. Kelly described it as a full-circle moment. “I truly hope every student at UGA, who may be feeling a little lost or overwhelmed like I was, finds the support they deserve.”

January is National Mentor Month, and January 17 is International Day of Mentoring. To learn how you can become involved with the UGA Mentor Program, visit mentor.uga.edu.

Three days in the frozen tundra (AKA what to do in Indianapolis)

As the clock ran down in the Orange Bowl and the Bulldogs heading to the Natty became a reality, thousands across the country began booking plane tickets and rental cars, purchasing game tickets, finding accommodations, and answering the question: “What does a Southerner wear to a January football game in the Midwest, when the temperatures are in the teens?” *don’t worry, I’m clueless as well.

As we are just a few days away from the big game, traveling fans may find themselves wondering how to spend a day (or three) in Indy. As a UGA staff member making the trek to assist with communications and hosting alumni on site, I found myself wondering what Indianapolis holds for fans during the frigid days and hours before the big game.

So, I gathered a few ideas from those in the know, Dawg fans. If you visit any of them, take a pic and tag us in social using #AlwaysADawg.

INDIANAPOLIS ALUMNI CHAPTER

Indianapolis Alumni Chapter President Liz Smith (AB ’82) suggested a few places to eat:

ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution knows that Indianapolis is “more than fast cars.” Here are a few highlights from its story:

VISIT INDY

The official welcome wagon for the city of Indianapolis, VisitIndy.com features hordes of ideas to curate a fun weekend in this Midwest town. Here are a few highlights I spotted on both their “things to do” list and their “where to eat” list:

HOMEFIELD APPARAL

Indianapolis-based Homefield Apparal offers licensed college apparel (including UGA). Their team posted a series of Tweets highlighting things to do and see in town. A few highlights for each of their categories are below; the full list is far more extensive:

INDIANAPOLIS HOST COMMITTEE

The group responsible for hosting the CFP National Championship has curated resources for travelers visiting the city for the big game.

DOWNTOWN INDY

This nonprofit organization focuses on developing and promoting downtown Indianapolis. Here’s its events calendar and lists of what to explore while in the area.

A FEW ADDITIONS

  • The Indiana Pacers host the Utah Jazz on Saturday night at 7 p.m. if you’re looking to makae it a two-sport kind of weekend.
  • Did you know there is a Georgia Street in Indy? The three, pedestrian-friendly blocks of this street connects the Indiana Convention Center with Bankers Life Fieldhouse and features food and beverage stations, concert stages, street performers and more.
  • Don’t forget there are several official events hosted by the CFP National Championship and you can find those on our football landing page.

I hope these resources help you enjoy a fun weekend in Indianapolis (capped off with a win for the Dawgs on Monday). Whether or not you’re heading to the game, be sure to tag @UGAAlumni on social so we can share photos and videos from Bulldogs around the world. Sic ‘em!

Turn up the volume and jam your way to Indianapolis

The Bulldogs are heading to Indianapolis, vying for a National Championship victory over Alabama on January 10. Whether you’re enduring the 9-hour drive to Lucas Oil Stadium or cheering on the Dawgs from Athens, a good old-fashioned playlist will help you prepare for an epic showdown in Indy.

From “Glory” and “Baba O’Riley” to “Dooley’s Junkyard Dogs” and “In the Air Tonight,” we’ve got you covered with over 140 songs in our Road to Indianapolis: National Championship Edition playlist.

Watch out, Bama. “The Boys are Back in Town” and are looking to rise up “Against the Tide.” “I Gotta Feeling” that our Dawgs are going to “Rock You Like a Hurricane” come January 10. “Don’t Stop Believin’,” Bulldog Nation!

The Jerry Tanner Show – 2022 National Championship: Alabama

We may win, we may lose, but above all else, I just want to dedicate this national championship game to all the Auburn fans out there.

The UGA Mentor Program is celebrating Mentor Month throughout January, and you can join the celebration by becoming a mentor. Invest in the next generation of Bulldogs by sharing your experience and helping a UGA student find their way in the world. Learn more at mentor.uga.edu.

Jerry Tanner is everyone you’ve ever met at a UGA tailgate, everyone who’s ever talked about Georgia football by your cubicle, and every message board poster who claims to have a cousin who cut Vince Dooley’s grass. He’s a UGA alumnus, he’s a college football fanatic with a Twitter addiction, and he’s definitely a real person and not a character played by Clarke Schwabe.

You are the company you keep

Today, as part of the UGA Mentor Program‘s observance of National Mentoring Month, we’re celebrating “I am a UGA Mentor Day.” If you’re a mentor (or a mentee), you’re in fine company! Consider some famous mentorship pairings through time:

Henry David Thoreau was mentored by Ralph Waldo Emerson.

This happened back in the day when, apparently, everyone used three names.

Aretha Franklin mentored Mariah Carey.

The Queen of Soul taught the Songbird Supreme a few things about R-E-S-P-E-C-T in the music industry. In 1998, the two powerhouses joined forces to sing “Chain of Fools.”

Professor Albus Dumbledore mentored Harry Potter.

Potter’s guide at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry shared whimsy, humor and sage advice: “We must all face the choice between what is right and what is easy.”

Mahatma Gandhi mentored beyond limits.

Neither time nor geography stopped the influence of Gandhi. Even though Gandhi never met these leaders, Nelson Mandela, Barack Obama and the Dalai Lama cited Gandhi as an influential mentor.

Obi-Wan Kenobi mentored Luke Skywalker.

Examples of mentoring relationships are found throughout Star Wars storylines. You can’t talk about mentorship without mentioning Obi-Wan and Luke’s Jedi relationship.

With members like these, who wouldn’t want to be part of this club?

Not every famous person is mentored by a celebrity. Sure, Oprah was mentored by Maya Angelou, but she also counts Mrs. Duncan, her 4th grade teacher, as a mentor whose influence was vital to her development. Neither woman was famous at the time.

Socrates mentored Plato … and Plato mentored Aristotle.

Don’t get too philosophical about it, but these Greeks made it clear that the gift of mentorship keeps giving.

Mentorship has its privileges.

Mentorship is a two-way street. There are benefits to both sides of the relationship. Check out a few of the UGA Mentor Program’s successful pairings.

As the saying goes: “You are the company you keep.” Make sure it’s Dawg-gone good company. Join the UGA Mentor Program.

Happy New Year + Happy Mentor Month

Happy New Year

As we celebrate the arrival of a new year, January marks the beginning of a new semester on campus. This means that UGA students will be looking for new mentors. Now is the perfect time to log in to the platform and update your UGA Mentor profile.

January is National Mentoring Month, an opportunity to recognize the power of helping young people identify and follow their passions. At the University of Georgia, we are celebrating all month with special emphasis on these dates:

I am a UGA Mentor Day – January 6

This is your day to celebrate your role in empowering the leaders of tomorrow. Use these social media graphics to highlight your participation in the UGA Mentor Program. There is a Zoom/video conference background you can use to show others how much the program means to you.

International Day of Mentoring – January 17

Internationally, this day recognizes Muhammad Ali’s birthday and his six core principles: confidence, conviction, dedication, respect, giving and spirituality. Those principles apply to mentoring relationships, too! It just so happens that this year, the date falls on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service – January 17

Today is a day to honor the memory of Dr. MLK Jr. and elevate the spirit of service through volunteerism. If you are paired with a mentee, this is a good day to reach out and share your experiences giving back to your community. You might find that you share common interests! Explore volunteer opportunities through Engage GA.

I am a UGA Mentee Day – January 25

Today, we celebrate the mentees. Take a moment to acknowledge the student you’re mentoring by posting a social graphic and/or photos of your current and/or former mentees.

Follow along with our National Mentoring Month celebrations by following the UGA Mentor Program LinkedIn page anad the UGA Mentor Program Instagram account @ump_ambassadors.

Interested in becoming a UGA Mentor? Learn more at mentor.uga.edu!