Pumpkin Carving for the Dawgs

There’s nothing like fall in Athens. The leaves turn red and orange, Saturdays are spent cheering for our team in red and black, and the weather (finally) cools. As the year winds down, how can a Bulldog fan make the most of it?

With themed pumpkin carving, of course. If you’re looking to create a spirited jack-o-lantern, an anti-Gator warning for your neighbors, or simply want to show off those two simple words (Go Dawgs!), your UGA Alumni Association has you covered!

We’ve created a stencil set so you can go full Athens Picasso on your pumpkin this year.

georgia-themed pumpkins

A plethora of Bulldog pumpkins.

Remember, it’s not about having the prettiest pumpkin. All that matters is that you display your love for the Georgia Bulldogs.

Don’t forget to tag us on social media (Instagram, Twitter) to share your pumpkin creations!

Below are examples of the stencils you can download by clicking on the button below!

The Jerry Tanner Show, Episode 8 – Florida

Jerry lets the hate flow through him as he previews the Dawgs’ trip to Jacksonville to renew the rivalry with the vile and untrustworthy Gators.

Find a game watching party near you at alumni.uga.edu/gamewatching and Never Bark Alone.

Jerry Tanner is everyone you’ve ever met at a UGA tailgate, everyone who’s ever talked about Georgia football by your cubicle, and every message board poster who claims to have a cousin who cut Vince Dooley’s grass. He’s a UGA alumnus, he’s a college football fanatic with a Twitter addiction, and he’s definitely a real person and not a character played by Clarke Schwabe.

What do you really know about bats?

Duh nuh nuh nuh nuh nuh nuh BAT … WEEK! Not what you were expecting? Neither was I until the Odum School of Ecology launched their Bulldogs for Bats campaign. Since then, I’ve learned a lot about bats that has completely reshaped my opinion. Much like the beloved DC Comics superhero who saves Gotham, bats are saving local ecosystems in the night and are often misunderstood. From Australia to right here in Athens, Georgia, bats serve as natural pest control and are essential pollinators of many plants.

So what’s Bat Week, you ask? It’s an international, annual celebration designed to raise awareness about the need for bat conservation. And it starts today! Did you know bats face risk of disease, habitat loss, pesticide use and wind energy, just to name a few? Diminishing numbers of bats pose a threat not only to the functioning of healthy ecosystems, but also to human well-being. Insect-eating bats, including the 16 species found in Georgia, save the U.S. agricultural industry at least $3 billion a year in pest control costs and crop damage. Bats also help control mosquito populations and may reduce the risk of emerging diseases, such as West Nile Virus, in the Southeast. This week, we’re spreading awareness about the vital role bats play, and how you can help save them.

Bulldogs for Bats is a campaign that’s been running the entire month of October to raise support for bat conservation efforts. All funds donated will provide local bats with a safe, sustainable environment while enhancing student learning and research opportunities. While many of our graduate students have conducted fieldwork research abroad, building bat houses in the community will provide students more chances for experiential learning and hands-on research right in our backyard.

So when you see some of these so-called “spooky” creatures on Halloween, think of the difference they’re making in our environment. And please consider saving the bats—what better time than during Bat Week?

UGA hosts ‘An Evening with Pat Mitchell’ on Nov. 4

Pat Mitchell HeadshotPat Mitchell (AB ’65, MA ’67), a renowned journalist who broke barriers as the first female president of PBS and the first president of CNN Productions, will discuss her career at an event launching her new book, hosted by the UGA Libraries.

The UGA alumna, who is originally from South Georgia, has earned 37 Emmy Awards and five Peabody Awards. Her book, Becoming a Dangerous Woman: Embracing Risk to Change the World, explores what it means to be a “dangerous woman” today and offers insight from her life and career.

During the event, scheduled for 6 p.m., Monday, Nov. 4 at the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries auditorium, Mitchell will read from her book and then be in conversation with fellow Bulldog Tom Johnson (ABJ ’63), former president of CNN and chairman emeritus of the Lyndon B. Johnson Foundation Board of Trustees. Tickets are $25 and will include a signed copy of Mitchell’s new book.

 

During a reception following the discussion, attendees can view an exhibition of Mitchell’s memorabilia, including several of her Peabody Awards, her first Emmy Award and selected documents and photos from her career in media as well as from her time as a student at UGA. The exhibit, A Dangerous Woman: The Life and Career of Pat Mitchell, will remain on display in the Brown Media Archive and Peabody Awards Gallery marquee until May 10, 2020.

For more information, contact Leandra Nessel at lnessel@uga.edu or 706-542-3879.

The Jerry Tanner Show, Episode 7 – Kentucky

Welp.

Jerry looks at last weekend’s debacle, then previews this Saturday, when the Dawgs will try to pick up the pieces against Kentucky.

Register for Cookies & Cocoa with Hairy Dawg by going to alumni.uga.edu/women and clicking on the event link.

Jerry Tanner is everyone you’ve ever met at a UGA tailgate, everyone who’s ever talked about Georgia football by your cubicle, and every message board poster who claims to have a cousin who cut Vince Dooley’s grass. He’s a UGA alumnus, he’s a college football fanatic with a Twitter addiction, and he’s definitely a real person and not a character played by Clarke Schwabe.

90 years of UGA football tickets

Times have certainly changed since the Bulldogs first kicked off on Herty Field in 1892. From the initial two-game season to game venues to the uniforms, we’ve seen drastic transformations⁠—and tickets are no exception. With Homecoming week upon us, we thought it would be fun to look back at how tickets have evolved over the years … starting in 1929.

Which one is your favorite? I’m partial to the nostalgic illustrations (and $3 price tag) of yesteryear. Unfortunately, the only similarity seems to be that they still don’t grow on trees. But I imagine the feeling you get between the hedges is about the same.

Happy Homecoming, Georgia family, and as we’ve been saying for a century: Go Dawgs!

1. 1929: Yale vs Georgia


Date: October 12, 1929
Price: $3
Score: 0-15 (W)

 

2. 1931: Georgia Tech vs Georgia

University of Georgia vs Georgia Tech ticket from 1931
Date: November 28, 1931
Price: $3
Score: 6-35 (W)

 

3. 1942 National Championship: UCLA vs Georgia


Date: January 1, 1943
Price: $4.40
Score: 0-9 (W)

 

4. 1963: Alabama vs Georgia


Date: September 21, 1963
Price: $5
Score: 32-7  (L)

 

5. 1966: Ole Miss vs Georgia


Date: October 8, 1966
Price: $5
Score: 3-9 (W)

 

6. 1971: Oregon State vs Georgia


Date: September 11, 1971
Price: $7
Score: 25-56 (W)

 

7. 1980: Vanderbilt vs Georgia


Date: October 18, 1980
Price: $10
Score: 0-41 (W)

 

8. 1980 National Championship: Notre Dame vs Georgia


Date: January 1, 1981
Price: $17
Score: 10-17 (W)

 

9. 1997: Mississippi State vs Georgia


Date: October 4, 1997
Price: Unknown
Score: 0-47 (W)

 

10. 2008: Georgia Tech vs Georgia


Date: November 29, 2008
Price: Unknown
Score: 45-42 (L)

 

11. 2019: Notre Dame vs Georgia


Date: September 21, 2019
Price: $75
Score: 17-23 (W)

 

Special thanks to the Hargrett Rare Book & Manuscript Library for helping us track down many of these ticket images. Be sure to check out “Beautiful and Brutal: Georgia Football, 2017” on display each Friday before home football games at the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries.

We hope to see you in Athens for Homecoming 2019. Learn more about school/college events, including the annual Black Alumni Homecoming Tailgate, at alumni.uga.edu/athletics.

From one boss to another

The value of a high-quality boss can’t be overstated. From advocate, counselor, teacher and friend–a great boss wears many hats!  

In honor of National Boss’s Day today, we asked some of our young alumni volunteers to share memories and lessons learned from their favorite bosses. Take a peek at their answers below … and remember to thank your boss(es) today!

Raj Shah (BSA ’06, MPA ’06, JD ’10)

UGA Alumni Board of Directors

Title: Senior Regulatory Attorney, MagMutual

Favorite Boss: Jon Rue, Parker Hudson Rainer & Dobbs

“Jon is the consummate professional and is extremely well-respected for both his professional achievements and community involvement. He taught me the importance of always finding time to listen, how to be actively present, and that humor is key to succeeding in the workplace.”

Jasmin N. Severino Hernandez (AB ’13, AB ’13)

Outreach Chair, UGA Young Alumni Leadership Council

Title: Associate Attorney, Davis, Matthews & Quigley, P.C.

Favorite Boss: Kevin Bowen, American Campus Communities

“Kevin took a chance on me when I was a new student at UGA who needed a job to make ends meet. Some of my favorite memories of Kevin include: tailgating for UGA games; when he made me work the leasing office during the ‘snowpocalypse’ of 2011 because I was the only employee snowed in on the property; and grabbing Firehouse Subs with him and his son Tyler. Kevin was a great friend and he taught me to be bold and stand for truth.”

[Jasmin and Kevin at one of their UGA tailgates, pictured top of page]

Hunter Knowles (JD ’12)

UGA Young Alumni Leadership Council

Title: Corporate Counsel and Assistant Secretary, Oxford Industries

Favorite Boss: Anonymous Law Firm Partner

“When asked if a more casual dress code could be implemented to match the attire of our clients, the partner responded ‘If our clients were the circus, would we dress like clowns?’”

Collier Hatchett Collier (BSED ’10, AB ’10)

UGA Young Alumni Leadership Council

Title: Director of State Board Operations, Technical College System of Georgia

Favorite Boss: Matt Arthur (BSED ’83, MED ’91), Technical College System of Georgia

“Matt and I are both graduates of the UGA College of Education and my favorite memory together is attending the 2018 awards ceremony where he received the COE Lifetime Achievement Award. Matt has taught me that it is never too late to show someone kindness and that becoming a good listener will allow you to understand others and help you become better at what you do. Plus, Matt also played on the 1980 National Championship football team (I have a pretty cool boss).”

Noel Hardin (BBA ’15, MACC ’16)

UGA Young Alumni Leadership Council

Title: Mergers and Acquisitions Senior Consultant, Deloitte

Favorite Boss: Travis Grody, Deloitte

“Travis and I started our careers in Audit at Deloitte. The most important thing he taught me was to take ownership of the quality of my work. Your brand is based on the quality of whatever you deliver. My favorite memory of Travis actually happened out of the office. A common trend for auditors during ‘busy season’ is to fall out of their exercise routines and gain 10-20 pounds (very similar to the ‘Freshman 15’). We spent a month traveling for a project in Toccoa, Georgia. Travis was getting married soon after our time in Toccoa, so he couldn’t afford to gain busy season weight right before his wedding. Toccoa is a very small town, but we found a gym online. We went the first morning before work, and the two of us worked out in the sketchiest old warehouse/gym you can imagine, with the sketchiest trainer you can imagine … and never went back. We found a different gym, had a great month in Toccoa, and Travis stayed in shape for his wedding!”

Even if you aren’t a boss, you can still help guide a fellow Bulldog’s professional journey – become a UGA Mentor today! You’ll be able to connect with a student who is seeking career advice on your time, on your schedule.

50 years of the Zeta Psi Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta

Members of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. who were initiated through the Zeta Psi chapter at the University of Georgia will be celebrating 50 years of sisterhood, scholarship and service the weekend of October 25–27, 2019, in Athens. To commemorate the anniversary, members have established a scholarship fund and will hold a community run/walk and health fair.

“We’re extremely excited about this historic milestone, not only for our organization, but for the University of Georgia and Athens community,” said L.D. Wells (AB ’96), president of the Anniversary Committee. “Through the Fortitude 1969 Fund, we have a unique opportunity to lead the campus toward funding need-based scholarships for students and faculty who meet the appropriate criteria. It’s a win-win for all involved because we get to celebrate our wonderful sisterhood by paying it forward and helping UGA students.”

Sorority members are inviting the UGA and Athens community to their “iRun & Walk for the Health of It” 6.9K race and health fair on Saturday, October 26 at 8:30 a.m. at Trail Creek Park. The health fair will be held in conjunction with the race, and proceeds will benefit the Fortitude 1969 Fund.

“Not only has this chapter made an impact at UGA, but we’ve been serving the Athens community for 50 years as well,” said Jennifer W. Richardson (BSHE ’88), president of the Delta Sigma Theta Athens Alumnae Chapter and member of the Anniversary Steering Committee.

The Zeta Psi Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. was chartered at the University of Georgia on November 11, 1969. Eight courageous women worked diligently to establish what would be the first Black Greek Letter Organization for females on campus, paving the way for more than 600 minority women to serve the university and Athens community: Carolyn Baylor Reed, Helen Butler (BBA ’72), Carrie Gantt (BSED ’71, MED ’78), Beverly Johnson Hood (BBA ’72), Cheryl Walton Jordan (BBA ’73), Barbara Atkinson Moss (BSED ’71), Debra Bailey Poole and Bendel Love Rucker (BS ’72).

“We’re definitely looking forward to reconnecting with everyone back in Athens where it all began,” said Francene Breakfield (BS ’95), vice president of the Anniversary Committee. “We’ve planned a full weekend of events, and we’re very fortunate that all of our living charter members are expected to celebrate our anniversary with us this year.”

$1.5 million gift to Odum School of Ecology honors legacy of ecology student John Spencer

Article written by Beth Gavrilles (MFA ’89)

John Spencer, a master’s student in ecology at the University of Georgia, was passionate about freshwater ecology, conservation and ecological restoration. A graduate fellowship established through a $1.5 million commitment from John’s mother and stepfather, Kathelen (JD ’82) and Dan Amos (BBA ’73), is ensuring that his legacy will reach far into the future.

“Kathelen and Dan Amos are two of the most generous and devoted alumni of the University,” said President Jere W. Morehead. “Their establishment of the John K. Spencer Fellowship is a meaningful tribute to John that will help advance the important work he intended to carry out.”

John Spencer arrived at UGA in the fall of 2014 and immediately distinguished himself at the Odum School of Ecology for his hard work, ready laugh, enthusiasm and, most of all, his thoughtfulness. He cared deeply about people and the natural world. His untimely death in 2016 left his family, friends and colleagues devastated.

“John’s memory is with us every day—his smile, his optimism and passion for life,” said John L. Gittleman, dean of the Odum School and UGA Foundation Professor in Ecology. “John wanted us all to enjoy and conserve the natural world around us. This gracious and kind gift will ensure that future generations will have the chance to fulfill John’s passion.”

John’s research focused on the health of urban streams.

“John wanted to study—and positively affect—how stream ecosystems respond to stressors associated with watershed land-use change, particularly urbanization,” said professor Amy Rosemond, who co-advised John with assistant professor Seth Wenger.

John studied the effects of elevated conductivity—the amount of dissolved ions, or pollutants, in water—on invertebrate communities in urban streams as a way to measure stream health. In December 2016, the University of Georgia awarded him a posthumous master’s degree in recognition of the work he had completed toward the requirements of his degree.

The John K. Spencer Fellowship was established that year with an initial gift from John’s family and contributions from more than 370 friends, classmates and colleagues. The two-year fellowship provides a research assistantship to students in the master’s in ecology or conservation ecology and sustainable development degree programs who are interested in pursuing careers in management and conservation of aquatic ecosystems.

To date, three students have received Spencer Fellowships, and their work is already having an impact. Inaugural Spencer Fellow Emily Johnson built upon the foundation of John’s research to identify particular disturbances impacting water quality in Athens-area streams and create a real-time monitoring system that makes it easy for municipal water managers to respond to issues quickly.

Zach Butler is studying the impacts of an invasive species, the nine-banded armadillo, on the ecosystems and native wildlife of the Georgia barrier islands. Zach’s research has upturned the conventional wisdom about this species, finding that they are helping to fill part of the ecological role of the gopher tortoise, a native species in decline across the Southeast. His findings are now informing coastal ecological management plans.

Talia Levine is studying contaminant levels in fish found in the Turtle Brunswick River Estuary near a Superfund site on the Georgia coast. She is measuring PCB and mercury concentrations in whole fish because, while fish consumption guidelines for the area exist, they are based on filleted samples only, and there is evidence suggesting community residents use more of the fish than just the fillets. Talia is sharing what she learns with government agencies and nonprofit organizations in the Brunswick area to support them as they work to ensure safe consumption of seafood resources by community residents.

“The John K. Spencer Graduate Fellowship honors John by providing our outstanding graduate students the opportunity to pursue careers in aquatic conservation and management and make a positive difference, as John intended to do,” said Gittleman. “This gift ensures the continuation of John’s legacy, for which we are immensely grateful.”