University of Georgia crossword puzzle

The first crossword puzzle ran in New York World on December 21, 1913, and was created by Arthur Wynne. Other newspapers began to run crossword puzzles shortly after, and the rest is history. Crossword puzzles now test our minds in newspapers, books, and more.

The University of Georgia’s independent newspaper, The Red & Black, publishes daily crossword puzzles online and in print on Thursdays, much to the delight of students seeking a distraction from their homework.

For many alumni, the R&B crossword was a daily endeavor on the bus and in (-between) classes. In honor of this little piece of UGA nostalgia, we designed a special UGA-themed crossword puzzle for you, our alumni and friends, to enjoy–after your homework is done, of course. See if you and your friends can get the answers correctly without peeking at the answers! Pro tip: we hope you remember the names of bus routes, dorms and dining halls.

The Jerry Tanner Show, Episode 13 – LSU/SEC Championship

Unstoppable force vs. immovable object. LSU vs. Georgia. Time to get revenge for 2018. Maybe. Hopefully. Please.

Feel like a student again at Alumni Weekend. Sign up at alumni.uga.edu/weekend and come home for the weekend.

Jerry Tanner is everyone you’ve ever met at a UGA tailgate, everyone who’s ever talked about Georgia football by your cubicle, and every message board poster who claims to have a cousin who cut Vince Dooley’s grass. He’s a UGA alumnus, he’s a college football fanatic with a Twitter addiction, and he’s definitely a real person and not a character played by Clarke Schwabe.

Happy Thanksgiving, Bulldogs!

At this time of Thanksgiving, we pause to reflect on the support of our friends and the impact it has made on the University of Georgia.

Because of this generosity, we overcome obstacles, join together as one, and rise to the top. It allows our students, faculty, and staff to experience opportunities that would have been impossible without your it.

We proudly present the 2019 Thanksgiving video, which tells a story of community and gratitude in the UGA family. Please share the video with your family and friends!

*A special thanks to our cast, staff, student workers, and many campus partners who came together to produce this video.

Finding a home as a first-generation student

Written by Jasmin Severino Hernandez (AB ’13, AB ’13), UGA Young Alumni Leadership Council Outreach Chair

I transferred to the University of Georgia in 2010, with no idea how the transition would work. I came from a small liberal arts college, where I felt like I was a big fish in a little pond. At UGA, I felt quite the opposite. I felt like the world was my oyster, but I also felt lost in the sea of people. As a first-generation student, it felt lonely because I was immersed in a new experience with no idea how to navigate it all. I graduated from UGA in 2013, with a degree in political science from SPIA & another in Spanish from Franklin.

I have amazing memories from UGA.

The first was when my roommate convinced me that pageants could teach me how to be confident in myself. With her help, I competed in various pageants throughout undergrad. My greatest memories are from competing in Miss UGA in 2012 and 2013. I was a runner-up in the 2013 competition and it is a moment I will never forget. My mic went out during my talent routine and the audience only heard the last 30 seconds of my song … ironically where I had to sing the highest note. I received a standing ovation before the judges made me do it all over again!

“Some of our greatest memories involve our similar journeys as first-generation students trying to find a home, a voice, and ourselves in a new and unfamiliar place.”

In 2013, I also found my home away from home. I became a sister of Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority, Incorporated, which is an academic sorority. The Delta Alpha Chapter of LTA helped me grow into the professional I am today. The sisters embraced me at a time when I needed support. They taught me the value of hard work and inspired me to always believe in myself and to embrace life’s unexpected twists and turns. I am still very involved with my sorority and I enjoy seeing how our sorority changes the lives of other first-generation Latinas at universities across the country.

Lastly, UGA introduced me to the love of my life. While at UGA, I met a boy who I am lucky enough to now call my husband. For an entire semester, we would casually run into each other on North Campus. One day, we finally spoke, and the rest is history. We took our engagement photos on North Campus, as a sweet nod to the place that sealed our fate. We were married on homecoming day this year, October 19, 2019, and we still enjoy calling the Dawgs on Saturdays. Some of our greatest memories involve UGA and our similar journeys as first-generation students trying to find a home, a voice, and ourselves in a new and unfamiliar place.

Today, I serve as the Outreach Committee Chair for the UGA Young Alumni Leadership Council because I truly believe that although my time at UGA was challenging in many ways, it also helped me grow immensely. I am very thankful for it all.

Somewhere along the way, UGA gave me everything I needed. Somewhere along the way, I found a home.

Featured image above by Claire Diana Photography

Robbie York (ABJ ’05) talks NYC, American Whiskey, and UGA

Robbie York, 40 Under 40

Robbie York is presented with a UGA 40 Under 40 award alongside UGA President Jere W. Morehead (JD ’80) (left) and Brian Dill (AB ’94, MBA ’19), president of the UGA Alumni Association.

Robbie York (ABJ ’05) is a Grady College of Journalism & Mass Communication graduate who lives in New York City and owns the official UGA venue in the Big Apple, American Whiskey. American Whiskey is the “home” of the NYC alumni chapter’s game-watching parties. In September, Robbie was recognized as a 40 Under 40 honoree by the UGA Alumni Association. We caught up with Robbie to learn more about how he’s helping foster a spirit of camaraderie and Bulldog spirit in the city that never sleeps.

How long have you lived in NYC?

Almost 14 years.

When did you open American Whiskey?

We are in the middle of our seventh year.

How long have the NYC Dawgs hosted game-watching parties at American Whiskey?

All 7 years. We hosted at another location for 6 years before that.

Did you open American Whiskey with the hope it would become NYC’s top UGA venue?

We definitely courted NYC Dawgs to come with us from a previous location. This was not only due to my affiliation and passion for the University of Georgia, but we (my partners and I) have always enjoyed the crowd and spirit of the game-watching parties. The answer is that we were hoping that the NYC Dawgs would want to be our one and only game-watching crowd, and we are proud to say they are.

How have game-watching parties grown since you started hosting them?

They have definitely grown over the years, I would say that this was due to many factors. Winning seasons help. Social media is a lot more prevalent than it used to be. We like to think that we make the party better every year. Improvements include menu changes, drink special updates, and little details (playlists, decor, etc) that add extra touches for everyone who visits.

What makes Saturdays in NYC special?

New York City is a difficult place to make it. So when you’ve had a hard week of work and the stress that goes along with it, Saturdays at American Whiskey become a place to cheer with your friends, meet other folks trying to survive in NYC, and find a common bond–which in this case is Georgia Football.

American Whiskey

A photo of American Whiskey, courtesy of Moreen Construction.

How does being a UGA alumnus impact the relationship between American Whiskey and the NYC alumni chapter?

I try my best to allow NYC Dawgs the accessibility of AW as much as possible. We offer our space for all events with no minimum, so it allows the chapter to have flexibility that very few volunteer organizations enjoy. I also work hard at using my status as an owner to leverage food and beverage brands to donate and help sponsor other events.

What’s the best part of hosting game-watching parties?

The excitement and joy that people share with each other. I love seeing people who get as excited for a touchdown as they do seeing someone in AW that they haven’t seen since college. Helping people make connections is the most special part of being there.

What’s something people might not know about NYC’s game-watching parties at American Whiskey?

We play Aerosmith’s “I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing” and Mariah Carey’s “All I Want For Christmas is You” when we win, immediately after the 4th quarter. Lots of people who are here know that, however, it came about from the happy accident of the music getting stuck in our internal system, and those songs being next in line.

Pumpkin carving for the Dawgs

There’s nothing like fall in Athens. The leaves turn red and orange, Saturdays are spent cheering for our team in red and black, and the weather (finally) cools. As the year winds down, how can a Bulldog fan make the most of it?

With themed pumpkin carving, of course. If you’re looking to create a spirited jack-o-lantern, an anti-Gator warning for your neighbors, or simply want to show off those two simple words (Go Dawgs!), your UGA Alumni Association has you covered!

We’ve created a stencil set so you can go full Athens Picasso on your pumpkin this year.

georgia-themed pumpkins

A plethora of Bulldog pumpkins.

Remember, it’s not about having the prettiest pumpkin. All that matters is that you display your love for the Georgia Bulldogs.

Don’t forget to tag us on social media (Instagram, Twitter) to share your pumpkin creations!

Below are examples of the stencils you can download by clicking on the button below!

UGA hosts ‘An Evening with Pat Mitchell’ on Nov. 4

Pat Mitchell HeadshotPat Mitchell (AB ’65, MA ’67), a renowned journalist who broke barriers as the first female president of PBS and the first president of CNN Productions, will discuss her career at an event launching her new book, hosted by the UGA Libraries.

The UGA alumna, who is originally from South Georgia, has earned 37 Emmy Awards and five Peabody Awards. Her book, Becoming a Dangerous Woman: Embracing Risk to Change the World, explores what it means to be a “dangerous woman” today and offers insight from her life and career.

During the event, scheduled for 6 p.m., Monday, Nov. 4 at the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries auditorium, Mitchell will read from her book and then be in conversation with fellow Bulldog Tom Johnson (ABJ ’63), former president of CNN and chairman emeritus of the Lyndon B. Johnson Foundation Board of Trustees. Tickets are $25 and will include a signed copy of Mitchell’s new book.

 

During a reception following the discussion, attendees can view an exhibition of Mitchell’s memorabilia, including several of her Peabody Awards, her first Emmy Award and selected documents and photos from her career in media as well as from her time as a student at UGA. The exhibit, A Dangerous Woman: The Life and Career of Pat Mitchell, will remain on display in the Brown Media Archive and Peabody Awards Gallery marquee until May 10, 2020.

For more information, contact Leandra Nessel at lnessel@uga.edu or 706-542-3879.

The Jerry Tanner Show, Episode 7 – Kentucky

Welp.

Jerry looks at last weekend’s debacle, then previews this Saturday, when the Dawgs will try to pick up the pieces against Kentucky.

Register for Cookies & Cocoa with Hairy Dawg by going to alumni.uga.edu/women and clicking on the event link.

Jerry Tanner is everyone you’ve ever met at a UGA tailgate, everyone who’s ever talked about Georgia football by your cubicle, and every message board poster who claims to have a cousin who cut Vince Dooley’s grass. He’s a UGA alumnus, he’s a college football fanatic with a Twitter addiction, and he’s definitely a real person and not a character played by Clarke Schwabe.

90 years of UGA football tickets

Times have certainly changed since the Bulldogs first kicked off on Herty Field in 1892. From the initial two-game season to game venues to the uniforms, we’ve seen drastic transformations⁠—and tickets are no exception. With Homecoming week upon us, we thought it would be fun to look back at how tickets have evolved over the years … starting in 1929.

Which one is your favorite? I’m partial to the nostalgic illustrations (and $3 price tag) of yesteryear. Unfortunately, the only similarity seems to be that they still don’t grow on trees. But I imagine the feeling you get between the hedges is about the same.

Happy Homecoming, Georgia family, and as we’ve been saying for a century: Go Dawgs!

1. 1929: Yale vs Georgia


Date: October 12, 1929
Price: $3
Score: 0-15 (W)

 

2. 1931: Georgia Tech vs Georgia

University of Georgia vs Georgia Tech ticket from 1931
Date: November 28, 1931
Price: $3
Score: 6-35 (W)

 

3. 1942 National Championship: UCLA vs Georgia


Date: January 1, 1943
Price: $4.40
Score: 0-9 (W)

 

4. 1963: Alabama vs Georgia


Date: September 21, 1963
Price: $5
Score: 32-7  (L)

 

5. 1966: Ole Miss vs Georgia


Date: October 8, 1966
Price: $5
Score: 3-9 (W)

 

6. 1971: Oregon State vs Georgia


Date: September 11, 1971
Price: $7
Score: 25-56 (W)

 

7. 1980: Vanderbilt vs Georgia


Date: October 18, 1980
Price: $10
Score: 0-41 (W)

 

8. 1980 National Championship: Notre Dame vs Georgia


Date: January 1, 1981
Price: $17
Score: 10-17 (W)

 

9. 1997: Mississippi State vs Georgia


Date: October 4, 1997
Price: Unknown
Score: 0-47 (W)

 

10. 2008: Georgia Tech vs Georgia


Date: November 29, 2008
Price: Unknown
Score: 45-42 (L)

 

11. 2019: Notre Dame vs Georgia


Date: September 21, 2019
Price: $75
Score: 17-23 (W)

 

Special thanks to the Hargrett Rare Book & Manuscript Library for helping us track down many of these ticket images. Be sure to check out “Beautiful and Brutal: Georgia Football, 2017” on display each Friday before home football games at the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries.

We hope to see you in Athens for Homecoming 2019. Learn more about school/college events, including the annual Black Alumni Homecoming Tailgate, at alumni.uga.edu/athletics.